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    Fallen-Champ's Avatar Senior Member
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    Prayer Flags


    In Tibet, the tradition of hanging flags began more than 2,000 years ago.

    At that time the country was ruled by war lords who carried their banners into battles. The native people, however, made their own flags to honor the nature gods of Bon, their shamanistic religion. They used colors of the five elements: blue for sky or space; white for air or clouds; red for fire; green for water and yellow for earth. They hung the flags over mountain passes and rivers to benefit all who would pass underneath.



    When Buddhism was introduced to Tibet in the 7th century, it brought the ideals of peace and compassion Within the next century Buddhism largely took the place of Bon, while absorbing many of its characteristics including the flags The early flags contained both Buddhist prayers and pictures of the fierce Bon gods who they believed protected Buddha.. Over the next 200 years Buddhist monks began to print mantras and symbols on the flags as blessings to be sent out to the world with each breeze. Thus they became known Prayer Flags.


    In the ensuing years, Tibet was ruled peacefully by a succession of spiritual leaders, the Dalai Lamas. Millions of men and women entered the thousands of monasteries to dedicate their lives to the practice of Buddhism, and the people of Tibet were thoughtful, daily practitioners of this compassionate, loving religion.

    All this came to an abrupt halt when the Chinese invaded Tibet in 1959.

    Tibetan prayer flags are traditionally used to promote peace, wisdom, compassion, and strength


    It is believed the energy of the prayers and sacred mantras on the flags are blown in the wind and will bring Joy , Happiness and good health to all who see them as well as their families, loved ones, neighbors, and all people throughout the world.

    As Buddhism grew the flags where adapted to contain Buddhist symbols and mantras, and are hence known as prayer flags.
    It is natural that prayer flags fade and fray, indeed they are intentionally left unhemmed for this to happen. This is symbolic of the inevitable passing of all things. New prayer flags can either be hung over the old ones, or the old ones can be taken down an burnt releasing the last of the blessings.


    At the centre of a prayer flag there is an image of the Wind Horse. On the Four corners of each of the prayer flags are images of a Garuda, Dragon, Tiger and Snow Lion which are the four sacred animals representing the four virtues of Wisdom, Strength, Confidence and Joy.




    Tradition tells us the Wind Horse in center of each flag will carry the blessings of love and compassion to all sentient beings through out the universe. As wind passes over the surface of the flags the air is purified and the wind energized by the Sacred Mantras that are printed on the Prayer Flags.


    Many People have noticed how the prayer flags seem to quickly uplift the environment they are in and bring joy to those that see them. They really have a beautiful noticeable effect on ones surroundings.


    Darchor, also made of the five colors, are very tall vertical flags attached to poles planted in the ground. Darchor translates as “to increase life, fortune, health and wealth for all sentient beings.”


    Lhadhar, the largest flag, are also very tall vertical flags. They are white in color, usually have no text, and contain ribbons of red, yellow, and blue. Lhadhar are displayed in front of important places, such as monasteries and palaces, and one must be formally dressed to enter these places. Lhadhar represent victory over the forces of evil, and are commonly inscribed with the four powerful animals, the tiger, the snow lion, the dragon, and the Garuda (a celestial royal bird). These animals are also on the four outside corners of a Lungdhar prayer flag, surrounding and guarding the Wind Horse.


    Goendhar, the smallest prayer flags, are located in the middle of a rooftop of a home. Rectangular in shape, they are white with ribbons of green, red, yellow, and blue attached to the edges. These flags are blessings for welfare, prosperity, and harmony in the family.


    Very tall white prayer flags, Manidhar, are also vertical and attached to poles. They are raised on behalf of a deceased person, as a way of remembering the person who died. It is believed that there are benefits from hoisting batches of 108 (an auspicious number) of Manidhar prayer flags. Although, hoisting one flag is just as beneficial.


    Prayer flags are considered holy, and should be treated with respect. When raising or hanging prayer flags, it is important to keep in mind this saying: “May all sentient beings everywhere receive benefit and find happiness.”






    Some say that they can be an environmental hazard that often get dumped leaving a mess or causing harm to animals, others love the peaceful vibes they bring - I am sure they will look really nice in Far Cry 4 - from the E3 video they were moving around in the wind and moving from the blasts of powerful weapons - Far Cry 4 might be anything but peace and harmony come November.
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    Fallen-Champ's Avatar Senior Member
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    Some more images of Prayer Flags / Stones and Stupa's


    Roof of the world: Tibetan Buddhist prayer flags are seen on the summit of Mount Everest. The Nepalese call the mountain Sagarmatha meaning 'Head Touching ..


    Prayer flags with Everest in the distance







    PRAYER STONES


    Tibetan prayer stones and prayer flags, near Tal, Annapurna Circuit, Nepal

    Mani stones are stone plates, rocks and/or pebbles, The same type of Mani stones can be seen in neighboring Nepal, where Buddhism is also widely practised. Large examples of Mani stones resembling tablets carved out of the sides of rock formations are in locations throughout the Nepali areas of the Himalayas, such as Namche Bazar. Mani stone walls are most numerous in the high country of the Khumbu. The mantra of Avalokiteshvara is also a common design on prayer wheels and prayer flags in Nepal.


    Tibetan Stupa with Prayer Flags

    HISTORY OF STUPA'S


    The stupa is the oldest Buddhist religious monument. In prehistoric times, stupas were simply mounds of earth and stones (tumuli) – places to bury important kings away from the village. Twenty-five-hundred years ago, at the time of Shakyamuni Buddha’s death, a change came about in the way stupas were regarded.


    The Buddha requested that his relics be placed in a familiar stupa, but with a shift in emphasis. Instead of being just a place of honor where the bones or relics of a cremated king were placed, the stupa was to be located at four corners (i.e., a crossroads), to remind people of the awakened state of mind. So, the stupa evolved from a mound of dirt (stup, Skt., “to heap up, pile, raise aloft, elevate”), to a king’s burial tomb, to a religious monument.


    After the Buddha’s death, stupas evolved from being used as shrines to the dead and into places to honor the living. They were erected to remind people far into the future that they, while living, had the seed of enlightenment.


    A stupa is intended to stop you in your tracks. It is an architectural representation of the entire Buddhist path. The body, speech and mind of an enlightened teacher is contained therein – a reminder of a timeless quality which one senses in old monuments. The Tibetan word for “stupa” is choten, meaning a receptacle for offerings and implying support for lay people to express devotion and connection to the Buddha mind.


    One of the ridges of Kongde showing through the clouds. A Tibetan stupa next to Kongde in Namche, Khumbu, Nepal.

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    AW LOST SOLDIER's Avatar FC Elite Member
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    I had to use hanging clothes to make these in my kyrat recreation. it wouldn't be kyrat without prayer flags.


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    Fallen-Champ's Avatar Senior Member
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    THE PRAYER WHEEL

    A prayer wheel is a cylindrical wheel on a spindle made from metal, wood, stone, leather or coarse cotton. Traditionally, the mantra Om Mani Padme Hum is written in Sanskrit on the outside of the wheel.
    Also sometimes depicted are Dakinis, Protectors and very often the 8 auspicious symbols Ashtamangala. According to the Tibetan Buddhist tradition based on the lineage texts regarding prayer wheels, spinning such a wheel will have much the same meritorious effect as orally reciting the prayers.








    Image of Tibetan elder with prayer wheel


    KATHMANDU, NEPAL - People spin buddhist prayer wheels at Swayambhunath


    An old Tamang woman praying and chanting mantra. She holds a prayer wheel that she spins while chanting

    Giant Prayer Wheel Photos in Guishan Hill Park,Shangri-la


    Two children run to twirl themselves from the perimeter of a giant prayer wheel




    Nepalese writing on stone


    Can't wait to see more of Far Cry 4 - looking around images of Nepal and other regions I think the setting will be superb but with it comes the history / culture / religion and that magical presence and sense of friendship and happiness.
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    Mr_Shade's Avatar Senior Community Manager
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    cool..
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    Fallen-Champ's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally Posted by AW LOST SOLDIER Go to original post
    I had to use hanging clothes to make these in my kyrat recreation. it wouldn't be kyrat without prayer flags.

    Yeah you did a really sweet job with that image made from the FC3 Editor ALS.



    Looking at a map of Nepal and surrounding countries you have China on the other side of the Himalayas, with Burma not so far away - India / Pakistan / Afghanistan / Vietnam, all have been extremely volatile countries (some still are)

    It will be interesting to hear what those thought of the area (should the developers give us an insight into the culture and views which they experienced) and also did they need any form of body guards on the trip while been out in remote areas.
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  7. #7
    Originally Posted by FALLEN CHAMP Go to original post
    and sense of friendship and happiness.
    So, someone will refrain from blowing your face off, to instead pick some wild herbs in the field behind them.
    Yes Champ, I like it!
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