1. #1
    I saw a interesting TV program on AZON bombs.
    Used on railvays and bridges in Burma 1944

    Look it up on internet "AZON boms" and you vil finding several interesting pages.
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  2. #2
    I saw a interesting TV program on AZON bombs.
    Used on railvays and bridges in Burma 1944

    Look it up on internet "AZON boms" and you vil finding several interesting pages.
    Share this post

  3. #3
    Read in one article that they only used 500 AZON boms to take out 27 bridges.
    That seemed a lot of bombs, over 18 for each bridge.
    Can anybody confirm this ??.
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  4. #4
    Kocur_'s Avatar Senior Member
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    AZON stands for AZimuth ONly, i.e. the bomb was (radio) guided only in one plane, so it was suitable only for such long, narrow targets.
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  5. #5
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by wintergoose:
    Read in one article that they only used 500 AZON boms to take out 27 bridges.
    That seemed a lot of bombs, over 18 for each bridge.
    Can anybody confirm this ??. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Actually, that is not a bad return. Bridges were very hard targets to take out.
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  6. #6
    For the time period that is excellent accuracy.
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  7. #7
    These were mentioned in a book I read recently, and I had never heard of them. The book was Those Who Fall by John Muirhead, a B-17 pilot stationed in Italy.

    In the book, Muirhead briefly discusses a mission in which he was selected to use the AZON bombs on a bridge. He describes how the bombs were guided from left to right, but the bombardier was still responsible for timing the drop; that is, fore/aft corrections were not possible.

    Muirhead flew the lead plane of a bombing group, and only the lead plane of each group carried the AZON bombs. The remainder of the bombing group carried regular "dumb" bombs, dropped in sequence after the lead plane.

    Muirhead had described elsewhere this tactic of dropping in single file after the lead plane. While that tactic was common, the AZON bombs were used only the one time by his squadron.

    The author also commented on the frustration of bombing bridges. He said that even direct hits only damaged portions of the bridge, never demolishing the whole structure. The degree of damage only affected the time required to repair the bridge. Muirhead said that bridges were always repaired quickly and appeared as targets on the mission board time and time again.
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  8. #8
    You may also want to look up the "BAT" used by the US Navy



    The Bat was one of the most sophisticated U.S. missiles of World War II. The Bat was a glide bomb carried by a Navy PB4Y-2 Privateer patrol bomber or other aircraft and was designed to destroy ships and off-shore enemy targets. It was not rocket-propelled but is still considered an early guided missile because it employed a radar homing device which guided the missile to its target. Visual contact with the target was not required. Like a bat, after whom it was named, the missile transmitted pulses and listened for their reflections from the target. The Bat was launched from its carrier aircraft flying as high as 15-25,000 feet and was released when within a 15-20 mile range of its target. The Bat carried a 1,000 lb General Purpose (GP) bomb warhead. The Bat was steered by controllable tail elevator driven by autopilot servo motors linked to small wind-driven generators and to the radar guidance system. The missile also had fixed wings and was also gyo-stabilized. The Privateer carried two Bat missiles underneath each wing rack. The launching speed of the parent aircraft was 140-210 knots. Western Electric Co. was responsible for the radar and Bendix Aviation Corp. for the gyro.

    Website
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  9. #9
    Kocur_'s Avatar Senior Member
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">The Bat was one of the most sophisticated U.S. missiles of World War II. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Oh not only US! It was most sophisticaded aerial weapon of the WW2 and it reamined such for decades! It was perhaps greatest technological achievement in conventional armament.The principle is very the same as in AIM-120 AMRAAM! The Bat was active radar guided missile! The targets were "easy" of course, i.e. very radar contrast, and the missile was large and heavy enough to accomodate radar homing device. Next attempt to build actively radar guided aerial weapon was Sparrow II in late 1940/early 50's, but it failed, so semi-active radar guided (there is only radar receiver in the missile, the launching plane provides radar "enlighting" of the target), so Sparrow III was built, known later widely as AIM-7 Sparrow. So in a way Bat is father of 40 years later AMRAAM.
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