1. #1
    First of many to come in a series called "Strafing Aces"

    P-51D-10 336ndFS 4thFG. Serial number 44-14787, Aircraft code VF*B. Flown by Major Fred W. Glover, Debden, England November 1944. Glover trained in the RAF and joined the 336thFS in February 1944. His first aerial victories were scored on 16th June 1944 when he shot down two Bf110s, becoming an ace on 3rd of August. Glover destroyed his first enemy aircraft on the ground 5th of April 1944, but scored most of his ground kills the following year, including three on 16th of January and another three on27th February. His total score was 10.333 in the air and 12.5 on the ground. Glover claimed four aerial and at least three strafing kills in 44-14787.


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  2. #2
    First of many to come in a series called "Strafing Aces"

    P-51D-10 336ndFS 4thFG. Serial number 44-14787, Aircraft code VF*B. Flown by Major Fred W. Glover, Debden, England November 1944. Glover trained in the RAF and joined the 336thFS in February 1944. His first aerial victories were scored on 16th June 1944 when he shot down two Bf110s, becoming an ace on 3rd of August. Glover destroyed his first enemy aircraft on the ground 5th of April 1944, but scored most of his ground kills the following year, including three on 16th of January and another three on27th February. His total score was 10.333 in the air and 12.5 on the ground. Glover claimed four aerial and at least three strafing kills in 44-14787.


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  3. #3
    "Sweet Thing IV" P-51D 374ndFS 361stFG. Serial number 4413537 Aircraft code B7*W flown by Lt.Col. Roy Webb. The first C.O. of the 374thFS, Roy Webb opened his aerial account with a Bf109 killed on 30th January 1944 whilst flying a p-47. One of four victories claimed by his uint on this day, these would be the first of 221 aerial kills credited to the 361stFG by wars end. Webbs fourth, and final, aerial vitory came on 25th June 1944 when he downed a Fw190 in newly-delivered 44-13537 south of Caen. Four days later he claimed all five of his strafing kills during a strafing attack on Oshersleben airfield. Webb was posted to a desk job at 8thAF HQ in August, having completed his tour upon reaching 300 combat hours.

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  4. #4
    "Sizzlin' Liz" P-51D 344thFS 4thFG. Serial number 44-15326 Aircraft code QP*H. Flown by Major Gerald Montgomery Debden England 1945. Montgomery flew two tours with the 4thFG, and scored his first aerial victory on 14th January 1944 when he downed a Fw190. In march and April 1944 he became a successful ground strafer, destorying seven Aircraft. Montgomery enjoyed more strafing success in 1945 when he destroyed a Bf109, a Ju87 and a Do217 on the ground at Weimar on 27th of February, followed by a solitary Me410 at Wittstock on the 10th of April. These final kills were all claimed in 44-15326, which Montgomery replaced with 44-72382 just prior to VE-Day. His final tally was three aerial and 14.5 strafing kills.

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  5. #5
    I dont deny that attacking a well defended airfield takes stainless steel balls, but to count a strafe as a kill is the same as qualifying straffing a dead donkey and count it as armor destroyed
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  6. #6
    Aren't you kinda defining ground kill on your own now? It's still one less aircraft they would have had to meet in the air, and was still a dangerous weapon that had to be destroyed.

    BTW, awesome skins. Adding them to my collection.
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  7. #7
    In the end the germans had more planes than fuel or pilots, so the count of ground kills as "kills" is moot, on the other hand, ground equipment such as tanks, armored vehicles, troop carriers, etc had more tactical effect to a point, just imagine, you are a german pilot and take off with four buddies to tackle a formation of 60 fighters escorting a couple hundred bombers...not much to do then....

    or just, your plane is destroyed on the straffing attack, you go to the depot and they have 45 or 50 for you to choose, but they have no fuel...he he
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  8. #8
    More "Aerial Aces" were lost to ground straffing than aircombat which is why the 8th AirForce awarded ace status for ground kills.

    A shameless bump. Yeah I know .
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  9. #9
    horseback's Avatar Senior Member
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    In the entire 8th Air Force, not one pilot with more than 15 aerial kills was lost in air to air combat; however, a great many were lost to bad weather (Hubert Zemke), collisions with wingmen, overeager wingmen (John Godfrey) or poor identification by fellow Allied pilots, FlaK (Walter Beckham), and low-level prop strikes while strafing (Francis Gabreski).

    By the end of April, 1944, German pilots as a combat hazard to experienced fighter pilots in the West were overrated.

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  10. #10
    Strafing Ace.
    "Lucky Boy" P-51D 505ndFS 339thFG. Serial number 44-73074 Aircraft code 6N*D. Flown by Majory Archie A Tower Fowlmere April 1945. It is likely that most if not all of his ground and 1.5 Aerial kills were in this plane.

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