1. #1
    Over the past few weeks I've put my mind to learning the Zeke and Oscar. I'm having a blast with them, what fun and pleasant aircraft they are!

    I'm having some difficulty with the Oscar II and its nasty habit of snap stalling on me during flat scissors vs a similar AI Oscar II. The departure occurs almost instantly and with no clear warning that I've been able to discern. The resulting spin is a real beast, too, and seems to require the better part of 1km to gain recovery.

    1) Any suggestions about how to better "read" the Oscar and identify when it's about to depart?

    2) Any suggestions about spin recovery? The spin seems to be immune from the standard rudder and aileron techniques. Recovery seems to occur of its own volition regardless of pilot input, any suggestions for encouraging Oscar II to recover a bit quicker?

    Thanks for your time and advice.
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  2. #2
    M_Gunz's Avatar Banned
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    Are you keeping the ball near center during the scissors?
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  3. #3
    Good point.

    Now that you mention it, there's a good chance that I'm over working the rudder. It's a pretty light rudder compared to US rides I'm used to.

    Thanks, Gunz.
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  4. #4
    This spin recovery technique works with every plane:

    1st. cut throttle: the idea is to minimize torque and for some reason it seems to help in getting the nose pointed down in really flat spins.

    2nd: full opposite rudder: this has the quickest effect in stall recovery and on some plane this alone will bring the plane out of a spin.

    3rd: Aileron roll toward the direction of the spin: This seems to help with more stubborn planes particularly P-400 and P-39 which have a habit of really flat spins.


    I used to do just 2 and 3, but 1 is an important step and with that should make recovery in any plane easy.
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  5. #5
    horseback's Avatar Senior Member
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    This game was designed to make full use of FFB sticks. As a result, those who have FFB sticks have all the little warning signs that most of us lack. Unfortunately, the best FFB stick (MicroSoft's FFB) went out of production about the same time as Forgotten Battles was released.

    One little 'cheat' I have found is to strap a 'vibrating' or 'rumble' type USB gamepad controller on or near your stick's base; the little shudders and bumps warning of a stall can be felt fairly easily this way, without afffecting your aim or control.

    The only drawback for me was that the rumblepad controller I got takes up the first controller slot, so I had to reassign all my joystick axes and buttons. I consider it a good tradeoff.

    cheers

    horseback
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  6. #6
    M_Gunz's Avatar Banned
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    First thing I do is let go of the stick.

    A good thing to do to find out the whys and what happened is to record the online kind of track (ntrk where you
    have to start and stop in game, not after exiting) and review later with different views, pause and slow-motion.
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  7. #7
    Wow, this is great stuff.

    Bill, that's the exact technique I've been using, but recovery only ever seems to happen when I place my hands in my lap and let Mr. Oscar sort things out (eventually). Good point about the P-39s. I sorta fancy myself to be a P-39 specialist and Mr. Oscar II is proving every bit as stubborn in a spin--and suprisingly flat for a front engine design.

    Horseback, I wouldn't have thought of that in million years. Clever! Next time I'm at the store, I'll grab one. That makes a ton of sense.

    Gunz, another great suggestion about recording. When I get a chance to fly tonight I'll do exactly that (and fully expect to see my rudder wagging like a lab's tail).

    Thanks again, fellas. I appreciate it!
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  8. #8
    Yeah bad rudder use is a good way to get into a flat spin.

    As Bill said the way to get out of one is to use full rudder in the direction away from the direction of the spin. I used to have a stick with a twist rudder and I had to lower the max rudder settings to avoid my plane from veering wildly, and I could never get out of a spin. I recently got some rudder pedals that give me max rudder movement and I find I can get out of spins usually with them.

    Also being up around 1000m or so is good to give you room to get out of a spin, 10m up in the air is not good.
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  9. #9
    For me, as soon as the Oscar begins to spin, I release the stick, and it quickly straightens out going in the same direction it was going before the spin occurred. Don't let the spin mature into something flat, and dangerous.

    I think the tendency to spin has to do with inherent instability which allows the plane to be more maneuverable. The I-16 is also unforgiving in the spin. Even though the engine is at the front, both planes have very short noses, with the cowling coming right out of the wing root.
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  10. #10
    If you can fly an I-16 without constantly flipping over or flat-spinning then you'll do well in any other plane, it's very unstable and finicky.

    On the other hand I've gotten into unrecoverable flat spins in the Bf-109 which is one of the most stable planes in the game.
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