1. #1
    I'm watching now some national geographic documentary about planes. There is info about controls which is rotated 90 deg. That means pushing stick right plane flyes up, pulling stick right means plane flyes down, pushing stick forward means left roll and pulling stick backward means right roll of a/c. They are talking about Sopwith Camel. I just want to know it it is true and if yes which a/c had this kind of controls.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

    "He,who has braver heart, more cold and full of foreseeing courage, which is born from believe in success and in righteousness of things, will smite his opponent." - Aleksandr Ivanovich Pokryshkin
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  2. #2
    wow, that sounds like a TERRIBLE idea!<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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  3. #3
    Hanglands's Avatar Banned
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    The only thing I can think of regarding the Sopwith and such, was that the engine produced obscene levels of torque.

    I mean levels of torque where your turn time port is very much quicker than your turn time starboard.

    But I never heard of the control stick being adjust 90 degrees out like that.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">


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  4. #4
    Troll2k's Avatar Senior Member
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    The Sopwith Camel used a true rotary engine.(the engine revolved around the cranshaft)This created in essence a gyroscope.With a gyroscope it tends to move in a direction 90 degrees to the input.

    With the Sopwith Camel when you move the stick to the left the plane turned left but also up/when you moved the stick to the right the plane turned right and down.(I think I got the directions correct)It took a lot of getting used to.

    More pilots were killed on take offs and landings then in combat.

    In any case the controls were not setup that way.It was
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  5. #5
    DuxCorvan's Avatar Senior Member
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    That seems exactly like my joystick works since Oleg introduced the 'new' FM engine...
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  6. #6
    Originally posted by Troll2k:
    The Sopwith Camel used a true rotary engine.(the engine revolved around the cranshaft)This created in essence a gyroscope.With a gyroscope it tends to move in a direction 90 degrees to the input.

    With the Sopwith Camel when you move the stick to the left the plane turned left but also up/when you moved the stick to the right the plane turned right and down.(I think I got the directions correct)It took a lot of getting used to.

    More pilots were killed on take offs and landings then in combat.

    In any case the controls were not setup that way.It was just the result of the gyroscopic effect of the huge engine block rotating around the crankshaft.
    I'm talking about results. They are showing some example with gyroscope. Some physicist is pushing plane sideways and for one point of yaw it is doing 10 points of pitch. I think it couldn't be called plane goes up and right just up. That's why they are talking about 90 deg turned inputs. If controls are really 90 deg turned I'm even more amazed by pilots who survived.

    This documentary is called Warplanes - Airplane to air force, around 20 min. If somebody wants I'm able to rip that part it's about 5-7 min long.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

    "He,who has braver heart, more cold and full of foreseeing courage, which is born from believe in success and in righteousness of things, will smite his opponent." - Aleksandr Ivanovich Pokryshkin
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  7. #7
    It's called gyroscopic precession - and it's plain physics. Short coupled aircraft (i.e. planes with rotating masses close to their CofG, like the Camel) suffer particularly, but can give roll advantage.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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  8. #8
    Hanglands's Avatar Banned
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    Gyroscopic precession put to use in the Lomecevak manoever http://www.fightercombat.com/vid_03Sep04.htm

    And a bit more about it http://jmrc.tripod.com/fa/aero/aero4.htm<div class="ev_tpc_signature">


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