1. #1
    The Luftwaffe over Germany: Defense of the Reich, by Caldwell and Muller -


    A very informative and even-handed history of the LW's defense of the airspace over the Reich. Recommended.

    P.s. - The book mentions that in July 1944 a pilot by the name of Prentzel (IIRC) defected to England in his 109G-14. Has anyone ever seen any documentation related to Allied performance tests or evaluations of this a/c?
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  2. #2
    I guess they mix up with those two 'Wilde Sau' G-6 nightfighters... same one as the 'gondie G-6/U2' AFDU trials, which are quoted everywhere. He didn't really defect as it seems, but made a navigational error with another pilot.


    Air 40/2418 Report A.D.I. (k) No. 371/1944 Landing of two Me 109Gs in error at Manston.

    Manston, Kent. 21st July 1944 at 02.45 hrs DBST, aircraft Messerschmitt Bf 109G-6 W.Nr. 163 240, the "Yellow 8" was airborne from St. Dizier at 00.45 hrs. on a "Wilde Sau" mission against Allied night bombers. The Staffelkapitän of 3. / JG 301 is a Hauptmann Sühr. Pilot of W.Nr. 163 240 is Feldwebel Manfred Gromill, of 3. Staffel, Jagdgeschwader Nr. 301.

    Manston, Kent. 21st July 1944 at 02.40 hrs DBST, aircraft Messerschmitt Bf 109G-6 W.Nr. 412 951, the "White 16" was airborne from St. Dizier at 00.45 hrs. on a "Wilde Sau" mission against Allied night bombers. The Staffelkapitän of 3. / JG 301 is a Hauptmann Sühr. Pilot of W.Nr. 416 951 is Leutnant Horst Prenzel, Staffelführer of 3. Staffel, Jagdgeschwader Nr. 301.
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  3. #3
    Originally posted by Kurfurst__:
    I guess they mix up with those two 'Wilde Sau' G-6 nightfighters... same one as the 'gondie G-6/U2' AFDU trials, which are quoted everywhere. He didn't really defect as it seems, but made a navigational error with another pilot.


    Air 40/2418 Report A.D.I. (k) No. 371/1944 Landing of two Me 109Gs in error at Manston.

    Manston, Kent. 21st July 1944 at 02.45 hrs DBST, aircraft Messerschmitt Bf 109G-6 W.Nr. 163 240, the "Yellow 8" was airborne from St. Dizier at 00.45 hrs. on a "Wilde Sau" mission against Allied night bombers. The Staffelkapitän of 3. / JG 301 is a Hauptmann Sühr. Pilot of W.Nr. 163 240 is Feldwebel Manfred Gromill, of 3. Staffel, Jagdgeschwader Nr. 301.

    Manston, Kent. 21st July 1944 at 02.40 hrs DBST, aircraft Messerschmitt Bf 109G-6 W.Nr. 412 951, the "White 16" was airborne from St. Dizier at 00.45 hrs. on a "Wilde Sau" mission against Allied night bombers. The Staffelkapitän of 3. / JG 301 is a Hauptmann Sühr. Pilot of W.Nr. 416 951 is Leutnant Horst Prenzel, Staffelführer of 3. Staffel, Jagdgeschwader Nr. 301.


    ..... Thanks for clarifying, K.
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  4. #4
    luftluuver's Avatar Banned
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    Just because the pilot went on a mission does not say that he had not decided to use the mission as a way to defect.
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  5. #5
    leitmotiv's Avatar Senior Member
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    Right, LL. For decades the fortuitous landings of the Ju 88R and the Ju 88G in the UK during WWII were explained as "navigational errors" and now we know both were got by other means to get a look at state-of-the-art German airborne radar.
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  6. #6
    Originally posted by Kurfurst__:
    I guess they mix up with those two 'Wilde Sau' G-6 nightfighters... same one as the 'gondie G-6/U2' AFDU trials, which are quoted everywhere. He didn't really defect as it seems, but made a navigational error with another pilot.


    Air 40/2418 Report A.D.I. (k) No. 371/1944 Landing of two Me 109Gs in error at Manston.

    Manston, Kent. 21st July 1944 at 02.45 hrs DBST, aircraft Messerschmitt Bf 109G-6 W.Nr. 163 240, the "Yellow 8" was airborne from St. Dizier at 00.45 hrs. on a "Wilde Sau" mission against Allied night bombers. The Staffelkapitän of 3. / JG 301 is a Hauptmann Sühr. Pilot of W.Nr. 163 240 is Feldwebel Manfred Gromill, of 3. Staffel, Jagdgeschwader Nr. 301.

    Manston, Kent. 21st July 1944 at 02.40 hrs DBST, aircraft Messerschmitt Bf 109G-6 W.Nr. 412 951, the "White 16" was airborne from St. Dizier at 00.45 hrs. on a "Wilde Sau" mission against Allied night bombers. The Staffelkapitän of 3. / JG 301 is a Hauptmann Sühr. Pilot of W.Nr. 416 951 is Leutnant Horst Prenzel, Staffelführer of 3. Staffel, Jagdgeschwader Nr. 301.
    I find it almost impossible to belive that they landed there due to a navigational error. Since we can safely assume they saw the runway, which by '44 i think i am correct in saying would be the longest runway in the country (enlarged by the usaf, so a whole squdron of b17 could line up at once i belive), i would guess that they couldnt of helped noticing the sea 1 mile north, 3 miles east, and 2 miles south, all distances ish. oh, and of course land going to the west...

    couple that with the fact that it also happens to be the closest base to mainland europe...

    if it was an accident, then i think they would struggle to find there way out of a phone box

    cheers fruitbat
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  7. #7
    The quote is directly from the British intelligence report that was done right after the aircraft landed. It's available on Tony Wood's site.

    Frankly I have no idea why would anyone want to cover up for 60 years how the British took possession of two... rotten down G-6s in which the newest thing was... an enlarged tail unit.

    Lots of planes mislanded during the war, Faber's plane was just one example. Single engined fighters, navigating on their own in the darkness, frankly I wonder how the heck at all these Wilde Sau pilots found a base to land at all..
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  8. #8
    I dont doubt for one second that they did say that, as you say its in black and white, therefore must be true.

    Still doesnt mean i belive them But it would of been an execelent way of saving face no? with one eye on the end of the war perhaps...

    As for the cover up, you've lost me there?

    cheers fruitbat
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  9. #9
    Hmmm... Wilde Sau, usually vectored roughly towards a known target, operating visually using the light of the illuminators or the fires already started.
    Operational radius of Bf 109 c. 200km.
    Manston c. 200km from nearest German city.
    As our American cousins say, "Do the math!"
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  10. #10
    luftluuver's Avatar Banned
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    Originally posted by thefruitbat:
    I find it almost impossible to belive that they landed there due to a navigational error. Since we can safely assume they saw the runway, which by '44 i think i am correct in saying would be the longest runway in the country (enlarged by the usaf, so a whole squdron of b17 could line up at once i belive), i would guess that they couldnt of helped noticing the sea 1 mile north, 3 miles east, and 2 miles south, all distances ish. oh, and of course land going to the west...
    The longest and widest runway in Southern England was built to allow badly damaged aircraft returning from Europe a safe haven, with the Fido fog dispersal system to allow landings in any weather.

    In 1950 the Americans arrived and stayed for eight years.
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