Thread: Underrated Guitarists | Forums

  1. #31
    infocat1's Avatar Senior Member
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    Hmm, least punk looking punk band I've ever seen.
    And Nigel, is that you?
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  2. #32
    Originally Posted by infocat1 Go to original post
    Hmm, least punk looking punk band I've ever seen.
    And Nigel, is that you?
    It's about the sound, not the look. Also, who is Nigel?
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  3. #33
    Danny-Ramone's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally Posted by Adem_H Go to original post
    who is Nigel?


    Presumably?
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  4. #34
    Originally Posted by Danny-Ramone Go to original post


    Presumably?
    Ahhhh...
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  5. #35
    DanAmrich's Avatar Rocksmith ComDev
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    We talk about "serving the song" fairly often on the stream, and this solo by Larry Mitchell -- yeah, who? -- on Ric Ocasek's "Rockaway" from the early 90s still gives me goosebumps. It's flashy yet restrained; it serves the song yet it steps out. I find it notable that they give him a full 16 bars in a pop hit.

    The solo kicks in at about 2:50, but listen a bit ahead so you can appreciate how this sort of comes out of nowhere for the rest of the song:



    Larry tried to make a name for himself at the end of shred, complete with the zebra print gimmick; I think I found out about him when I was at GW. He's focused back on blues rock and I hear a little Eric Johnson and Jimi Hendrix in his style now. If that's your thing: http://www.larrymitchell.com
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  6. #36
    It's Monday again and today's underrated guitarist of focus is Criss Oliva of Savatage. This guy wrote some of the most intelligent and interesting metal songs of the 80s, sadly he was killed in a car crash age 30. Another sad thing is that although Criss and Savatage were unrecognized geniuses of the genre, they never achieving the sales their music richly deserved. Sadder still, Criss was ignored during his lifetime by the leading guitar magazines of the day. Guitar World and Guitar Player never did an interview with him; and after his death, neither magazine felt compelled to honor him posthumously as one of the most influential guitarists of this genre. Criss Oliva was Savatage, whilst the band has carried on after Criss death, they have never written an album as good as those that featured Criss.

    As mentioned, each Savatage album is packed with killer riffs, sometimes multiple great riffs all in the space of one song. Lead wise Criss was an exciting player, who could best be described as a combination of Eddie Van Halen's virtuosity, Michael Schenker's sense of melody and Randy Rhoads' focus and vision. As a player he only got more and more interesting with each release, had he lived there's no telling what he would have gone to accomplish, but what he left with is enough for me to consider him very underrated



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  7. #37
    OK, so I know I said a Monday tradition, but I've been really busy lately and I just haven't had the time. But considering I've been typing on the forums a huge amount, I thought, why not?

    Today's guitarist of focus is Wolf Hoffmann of Accept, who known for two things: being the chronologically being the second V-wielding German Metal God (let's see if anyone can guess the first) and unfortunately, he's known for being an unknown. Wolf is probably the best metal guitarist you've never even heard of, since Accept's brand of uncompromising metal was never as quite as accessible as many other metal contemporaries. Outside of Balls to the Wall virtually nothing that Wolf has done is known to anyone even hard rock and metal guitarists. Consequently Wolf is severely underrated save for an inner circle of loyal fans.

    First we have the riffs: not only are Wolf's riffs extremely crunchy and ballsy, but they're also very melodic and musical. Wolf is also capable of coming up with multiple great riffs consistently, in this respect he's kind of like a German Tony Iommi.

    Next we have the songwriting and composition, it's not only the riffs but also how Wolf arranges them in the context of a song. Sometimes he'll attack you with a relentless riff and then a huge chorus. Other times he'll start off slow and quiet and then build up to increase the impact of the song. Most importantly he knows when to play and when to not play.

    His other great talent (which somewhat ties into the songwriting) is dynamics. He'll contrast slow with fast. Soft with loud, which helps make the songs interesting. A trademark of Wolf Hoffmann and also a dynamic trick is as follows. While playing some heavy, beefy riff on the low strings, another part of the same riff will often contain a chord played so that only the high strings B and E (sometimes G, B, E) ring out. The high string chord slices through the rest of the riff like a blade and provides dynamic contrast.

    As for his lead work, whilst he doesn't have the same chops as the original German V-wielding Metal God, he still has a nasty attitude with more grit to his work, which is nicely balanced with the sense of melody. Hoffmann's solos are compositional masterpieces. Emotional journeys that have beginnings, middles, and ends. As stated earlier, they have both attitude and melody, which always go a long way. Wolf likes to use slow, attitude-based playing to set up fast flashy licks. He's not a true shredder, but he's as fast and as clean as he needs to be or more importantly as the song needs it to be.



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