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View Full Version : Why I am done with the Assassins Creed franchise (no rant/constructive feedback only)



Dieinthedark
01-08-2015, 09:38 AM
After playing all of the Assassinís Creed games that have been released on console, excluding Rogue, I felt compelled to offer a bit of insight into why I am finished with this franchise. This is absolutely NOT a simple trolling post of why I think AC sucks, nor is this a rant about bugs or glitches or questionable marketing practices by Ubisoft. Rather this is a collection of points that I hope are well enough supported to be constructive. Obviously we all hope that our posts reach the higher ups, but as I doubt that will be the case, hopefully this can spark some discussion anyway. Without further ado, letís get started:


Issue #1: Creditability with gameplay elements


When a player begins any new game in franchise they are starting the game with an open mind, open to the ideas and the concepts that the development team have put forth. That initial creditability must be great enough to both entice the player (making them feel powerful generally) and hold them over until the narrative can provide more ďconcreteĒ creditability for the game. Narrative is what holds gameplay elements together; having thirty different gameplay elements for no reason other than the sake of having them is simply poor game design. The following are a few select gameplay elements I thought were worth mentioning:

Example: Renovating buildings (AC2-ACU)

Best implementation: AC2- This gameplay element works in AC2 as Monteriggioni is the location that Ezio resides. It makes sense in the narrative that Ezio would renovate buildings to provide better conditions for the citizens with which he lives. It serves as a sort of parallel in progression to the character development of Ezio. As your character progresses and acquires more money, Monteriggioni also progresses from an old, run down village, to one a bit more vibrant and thriving.

Worst implementation: ACU - This gameplay element is never explained in the narrative as to why it would be important. Players who have played the previous entries may (correctly) assume that renovating social clubs will bolster their income but why would Arno undertake this responsibility? He does not rule over Paris, nor does he alone control the districts in which these social clubs are located. In fact, he is not connected to this clubs in any way. However, renovating these clubs provides monetary income, new missions, and nomad points for the companion app (more on that later).

Example: Hunting (AC3)
Although I did not find this gamplay element enjoyable in the slightest, it was implemented well. It made narrative sense that Connor, as a Native American, would hunt animals and trade their pelts for money.

Example: Crowd Mechanics and Density

Best implementation: ACR Ė Civilians reacted to what was going on around them. Numerous types of bombs would draw civilian attention to an area thus causing guards to investigate. Two combating factions caused panic between the civilians. Generally felt more alive, as did AC2.

Worst implementation: ACU Ė The most frustrating reason, and the sole reason I give this the title worst implementation, is because it was such an incredibly hyped feature. Ubi told us that new consoles could render thousands of NPCs on screen at once, at certainly that seemed promising. But the problems with the crowds are numerous. Unlike previous entries, players no longer have the ability to shove people out of the way which mean crowds now become a hindrance to movement. Second, blending into a crowd and throwing a cherry bomb several feet away causes you to lose your blend ability though you are still standing in the midst of the crowd of hundreds. Third, guards who fire into the crowds while chasing you either never hit civilians or even if they do kill them, they donít provoke fights. We all know that civilians attacked ruthlessly during the French Revolution but they simply stand by idly. Having dense crowds for the sake of having them is not a worthy feature, give us systemic crowds that react to what we are doing, to how guards treat them. Finally, fear does not propagate well in the crowds nor does it do much to attract guard attention away from you.


Issue #2: Creditability with narrative elements


Assassinís Creed 1, you play as Desmond Miles in what seems to be a fairly intriguing, modern storyline. The Animus, Abstergo, and how this entire technology works is explained right off the bat. AC2 you realize you need to continue using the Animus for the bleeding effect to take hold and gather the experience of your ancestors in a short period of timeÖfor the purpose of fighting Abstergo. Abstergo has constantly been painted as the bad guys, the modern day Templars, your sworn enemy. But by ACR, you realize all of your training isnít really doing much for Abstergo. Sure, there are modern day sequences but they are terribly linear and donít offer but a smidgen of content in the franchise. Certainly there are fans who said that they didnít find the modern day story line all that interesting, and perhaps Ubi listened more strongly to them than to the others. But modern day was never given the attention or the care that the historical settings were given. The other possibility is that it would have been difficult to justify using melee weapons in a modern time period but Iím sure that with the numerous numbers of talented people Ubi employs, something believable could have been written.

Anyway, as we know Desmond dies, saves the world, woohoo! But now your narrative has taken a severe hit. We were never playing a strictly historical game, the modern time period has always existed. But we are then told to believe in just a matter of seconds that Subject 16ís body was recovered and now we can access his memories from anyone, at any time. And there goes the narrative credibility. The concept perhaps could have worked but as a fan of the franchise it is rather disheartening to see five gamesí worth of credibility simply overwritten by one poorly executed cinematic sequence.

Player trust is now broken, the modern setting might as well be disbanded after such a poorly written excuse. But nevertheless, Mr. Floating Tablet now can walk around to get into an Animus or hack an occasional computer. But these gameplay elements serve no narrative purpose. They might add a little back story but they are not compelling, nor do they work with the gameplay elements that are created in the Animus. Desmond was at least able to climb and attack as in the Animus. The new gameplay elements (hacking, walking around at a painfully slow pace) simply break immersion. Do not ďoption awayĒ your game; if it is included it needs to be important, tied to the overall narrative or in meaningfully furthering the game as a whole.


Issue #3: Setting (time period) Ė Real enemies vs generic terminology


I strongly believe that the Assassinís Creed franchise is going the wrong way in history for several reasons. First and foremost, the narrative no longer supports the time period. AC1 (and AC2 but for the sake of argument I shall stick with AC1) arguably had the best settings in all of the franchise history, for the simple reason that the setting, mainly the time period, not the location, made the narrative more credible. As an Assassin, our sworn enemies are Templars, who truthfully did exist during the Crusades. Mixing parts of fact with fiction creates a very strong narrative if done properly, and by my judgment, that was executed well. However, previous iterations see the Templars simply become a name. Perhaps our targets wear the Templar Cross or our characters find out they are working for the Templars, and granted, no one knows what happened to the remnants of them but with each game, it seems as though Ubi is simply pointing a finger at a bad guy, calling them a Templar and having us kill them. Thereís not the same level of intrigue or solid bits of history to reinforce the claims. Being a ďTemplarĒ is simply becoming a go-to term for the bad guy(s).


Issue #4: Setting/Technology


Another point to make is that by continually advancing the time period in which AC games occur, technology advances and by that I mean guns. Lots and lots of guns. I stated in the title that this is not going to be a rant thread; I am truly trying to be constructive so I will not turn this into a ďguns killed Assassinís CreedĒ thread. But it is still worth a short examination.

Sword or any other blade combat in AC offers two methods of approach: One can either attack their opponents with their own blade or defeat them, or they can play defensively and attempt to parry attacks and counter attack. (Dodging I am omitting for the sake of argument because it is merely a tool, you cannot win a melee encounter by dodging)

Gun combat also offers two methods of approach: One can attack with their own guns, or they can attempt to dodge their shots. There are two differences in this however. First, blade combat offers the ability to counter attack. By correctly timing a button press you can momentarily gain a foothold which you can potentially turn into an advantage by attacking. However, dodging in gun combat offers you NO same foothold, no even ground to potentially turn the encounter around. In fact, you may dodge one gunman, simply to have another trained on you for as soon as your dodge roll animation completes. Couple this with the fact that one cannot dodge roll indefinitely (there is a small enough window between repeatedly rolling that you can still be shot) and you have a recipe for failure. Additionally, there are numerous instances when engaging in melee combat that armed riflemen will not show up on screen with icons notifying the player to dodge. Subtle sound cues would be a lot more reliable in these instances.

The second point is that should a player be able to dodge out of harmís way, I do not believe that enemy soldiers with guns have a limited ammo count (please correct me if I am wrong). Certainly, looting riflemen can yield different amounts of ammo but in combat I have yet to see an enemy run out of ammo and switch to melee combat. Contrastingly, the player character is severally limited in ammo. This is not to say that the player character should also have unlimited ammo but rather, enemy soldiers ought to be limited.

The reason for this however seems pretty clear. Many (including myself) have wanted AC to return to the stealth principles. Playing stealthily is a reward in and of itself as it (ideally) gives the player an upper hand in what would otherwise be an unmanageable situation. For that, I praise Ubi. Stealth is now indeed a fundamental priority, and leaps and bounds beyond that of previous games. That being said, forcing the player into stealth gameplay to achieve an upper hand without also having some sort of balancing factor should the player attempt to play in another fashion simply causes frustration.

Final note on stealth: if stealth gameplay is going to be pushed to this level, it needs to be fully functional. I loved finally having a stealth system, being able to take cover and slide to cover beside you. But take a page from your own Splinter Cell franchise Ubi, the player needs options in cover. We need to be able to move to cover positions in front of us, preferably with arrow markers showing us where we will be should we swap cover (Splinter Cell Conviction/Blacklist). This would make stealth much more feasible than simply running to cover position and taking cover, or needing to move to a cover position in front of you and being forced to slowly crouch walk forward. Stealth movement needs the same level of fluidity as free running if it is to be taken seriously.


Issue #5: Player value/respect


This is the first time I have ever truly felt like Ubisoft does not care about their consumer base at all. First off, when we first open the map in ACU, I am sure we were all overwhelmed by the number of icons on screenÖso much to do! But then we start realizing that things are locked behind Initiates, vaguely telling us we arenít at a high enough level to access it, or the dreaded companion app. The point to be made is not the black and white approach, donít waste your time on casual/tablet games, but rather just respect the player. Many of us went to a midnight release of what is probably our favorite franchise, we shell out 60 hard earned dollars, or more with the season pass, and we expect to be able to access everything we pay for. So Iím not saying, donít make a companion app, (personally I donít enjoy it, in fact Iíd say I hate it, but some might like it).

What I am saying is respect the player; donít show us all the things that we canít get at first. For the first say two hours, the only job you should have is to amaze us. Show us the gameplay, show us the narrative, and entice us in your world. Locked chests and other side programs and apps we have to play to get the rest out of our game are brick walls. Introduce those to us later, slowly. Tell us why they are important before you just throw everything in our face and make us feel cheated that we donít get everything we paid for. Iím not going to go on about the problems with the companion app or whether it is feasible or reasonable to spend so much time designing those as Iím sure new business models pretty much require that. I ask that you respect us, the player, and we in turn will respect you, or at least more than we would otherwise.


Alright folks, thatís it! If you managed to read all that, pat yourself on the back :D I hope this spawns some good discussion and can hopefully be passed along to some of the higher ups. I donít care if you agree, disagree or a little of both with this, letís get some conversation going.

Regards,
Dieinthedark

PS: If thereís any part of the story descriptions you feel I messed up in explaining, cut me a little slack, I donít usually replay an AC game once I complete it ;)

shobhit7777777
01-08-2015, 10:40 AM
Example: Crowd Mechanics and Density

Best implementation: ACR – Civilians reacted to what was going on around them. Numerous types of bombs would draw civilian attention to an area thus causing guards to investigate. Two combating factions caused panic between the civilians. Generally felt more alive, as did AC2.

Worst implementation: ACU – The most frustrating reason, and the sole reason I give this the title worst implementation, is because it was such an incredibly hyped feature. Ubi told us that new consoles could render thousands of NPCs on screen at once, at certainly that seemed promising. But the problems with the crowds are numerous. Unlike previous entries, players no longer have the ability to shove people out of the way which mean crowds now become a hindrance to movement. Second, blending into a crowd and throwing a cherry bomb several feet away causes you to lose your blend ability though you are still standing in the midst of the crowd of hundreds. Third, guards who fire into the crowds while chasing you either never hit civilians or even if they do kill them, they don’t provoke fights. We all know that civilians attacked ruthlessly during the French Revolution but they simply stand by idly. Having dense crowds for the sake of having them is not a worthy feature, give us systemic crowds that react to what we are doing, to how guards treat them. Finally, fear does not propagate well in the crowds nor does it do much to attract guard attention away from you.


The above is by far the most glaring and troubling issue with ACU IMO

Large crowds - do nothing

I too am done with the franchise. ACU is an extremely 'dumb' game. Nice concepts but shockingly poor execution. It lacks the finesse one would expect from Ubi. For me, the assassin experience was at its pinnacle in ACR and the last fun AC game was AC4.

The stealth is clunky and derivative. The social stealth is a huge step back thanks to dumb ****ing AI and crowds...not to mention the absolutely idiotic design decisions example - cherry bombs. The huge crowds populating the city are wasted. The AI is thick as ****....its atrocious. The game is chock full of freemium mobile game practices (I would know).

Absolutely **** all works

ACR - a game released ages ago - outdoes ACU from a strictly assassin experience POV. The tight urban geometry of Istanbul was perfect. The crowd was dense and provided equal blending oppurtunities. The Templar Dens were urban forts. The bombs could be used to spark off faction fights. The crowd manipulation elements were there.

You'll also notice that they 'Blacklist'd Arno's movements...remember the terrible inertia when moving Sam Fisher around....its here...in spades. Little things like the crowd parting as Arno passes through are rough and immersion breaking

****

In a game with such HUGE crowds as a USP and a core gameplay mechanic...there is no smooth movement through the crowd....something that the last AC game had.

I was recently playing some assassin contracts in AC4 (Kingston) and it does as good a job as Unity when it comes to the urban assassin experience...which is a ****ing shame because thats exactly what ACU was built up on.

Ubisoft has been consistently over promising and underperforming when it comes to gameplay design. Watch_Dogs, Splinter Cell Blacklist, AC Unity....some of the most boneheaded and horrible design decisions which completely shaft the original concept....and I'm ****ing tired of it.

It irks me more when the same publisher comes out with games like AC4 and FC4. Two extremely well designed games. It baffles the brain.

UKassassinsfan
01-08-2015, 12:54 PM
I do also agree with a lot of your points here. However I am not done with the franchise, I'm in way too deep to stop playing now I guess. Had unity been a standalone game I probably wouldn't purchase any sequels but I am a huge assassins fan, which is another reason why a poorly executed game is all the more frustrating.

The crowds:
I remember one of the coop demos, and it showed the assassin killing a guard in front of thousands, this prompted the crowd to storm the palace killing the guards. Not once have I seen this in action, I've even deliberately tried but I concur that the crowds feel like they are there for the sake of crowds! I think it would really cool if you could actually interact with the crowd, say for example; spread a rumour, which you see spread throughout the mass of people, this could force them to react angrily, passively etc.

Stealth:
In honesty the stealth was the best in any assassins game, the ability to cover etc really did promote a more hidden gameplay style. Me personally, I love playing stealthily and would rather not commit open combat unless I had no other option. I agree however the stealth gameplay could be fleshed out further, having a cherry bomb as the only means to distract is clumsy. If I want to alert just one guard and beckon him to my cover spot I can't because now the whole of paris hears me lol.

Story:
The fact that the story is the least relevant story yet is also frustrating, the concept of assassins creed originally was excellent because we were going back for some real important reasons, finding out that the work we did in unity was for naught just doesn't make sense! It's huge kick in the teeth to fans who want to see a progression in the story. I haven't yet played rogue but that sounds like it progressed the modern arc infinitely more than unity!

As a whole I am disappointed with unity, it's just quite a pretty game with some nice vistas but aside from that it feels unfinished! I sincerely hope that DLC answers a few questions and silences critics.

Megas_Doux
01-08-2015, 01:56 PM
A really good post, full of interesting points truly worthy of mention and that I would like to elaborate further on.

Shahkulu101
01-08-2015, 05:02 PM
I agree with this post, Unity is deeply flawed BUT in comparison to previous titles the core mechanics are much better - which goes to show how poor they were beforehand. I don't know why you'd hop off now, when things are improving, after the mechanics effectively stalled since AC2. Unity is the first actual innovation of the core mechanics since AC1, so why were you not quitting the series after 3 games in a row with the exact same poor design time after time (Ezio trilogy)?

I don't understand why Unity is somehow the greatest of evils for you when the Ezio trilogy abandoned the original games concepts and turned the series into a historical GTA and AC3 tried to make the series into a linear action orientated 'cinematic' experience. As for AC4, that was a nice distraction but the core mechanics were still rotten as ever even though the naval stuff was fantastic. So I fail to comprehend how Unity was the last straw for you when the previous games are even more flawed.

shobhit7777777
01-08-2015, 07:22 PM
I agree with this post, Unity is deeply flawed BUT in comparison to previous titles the core mechanics are much better - which goes to show how poor they were beforehand. I don't know why you'd hop off now, when things are improving, after the mechanics effectively stalled since AC2. Unity is the first actual innovation of the core mechanics since AC1, so why were you not quitting the series after 3 games in a row with the exact same poor design time after time (Ezio trilogy)?

I don't understand why Unity is somehow the greatest of evils for you when the Ezio trilogy abandoned the original games concepts and turned the series into a historical GTA and AC3 tried to make the series into a linear action orientated 'cinematic' experience. As for AC4, that was a nice distraction but the core mechanics were still rotten as ever even though the naval stuff was fantastic. So I fail to comprehend how Unity was the last straw for you when the previous games are even more flawed.

I wouldn't say it was "Innovative"
Allow me to pick this apart

The first actual innovation was brought in by the Ezio trilogy

Blend crowds, faction groups, notoriety put the "social" in the franchise's social stealth. Combat was ramped up with killstreaks, disarms, weapon usage. A brotherhood system was put into place. Granted that the Ezio trilogy's main mission design was IMHO horrendous and leant towards the bombastic, exotic, set-piece orgy typically found in the CoD games....but the overall gameplay was solid.

ACU does indeed fix many flaws...or tries to. Its certainly a step in the right direction (arguably a leap in the right direction) but its too little too late.

Crouching and cover based stealth is clunky in ACU and comes in after SIX games. Its too little too late. The stealth mechanics in Unity are extremely derivative and not at all innovative

Furthermore, the AI is dumb. The DUMBEST I've seen in any modern video game. Search routines are a joke. The crowd and the guards simply are two disconnected systems. ACU is easily the most archaic AC game when it comes down to the game systems. I felt more capable as an Assassin in Revelations and Black Flags than in ACU.

ACU may not be the worst out of them all, but its the last straw for me.

Ubi needs to sort out its AC design team...or maybe its leadership....IDK....because ACU was a mediocre game.

Gimme 2 months and complete control over Ubisoft Global and I'll un**** this straight away. I'm Batman.

Shahkulu101
01-08-2015, 07:47 PM
I wouldn't say it was "Innovative"
Allow me to pick this apart

The first actual innovation was brought in by the Ezio trilogy

Blend crowds, faction groups, notoriety put the "social" in the franchise's social stealth. Combat was ramped up with killstreaks, disarms, weapon usage. A brotherhood system was put into place. Granted that the Ezio trilogy's main mission design was IMHO horrendous and leant towards the bombastic, exotic, set-piece orgy typically found in the CoD games....but the overall gameplay was solid.

ACU does indeed fix many flaws...or tries to. Its certainly a step in the right direction (arguably a leap in the right direction) but its too little too late.

Crouching and cover based stealth is clunky in ACU and comes in after SIX games. Its too little too late. The stealth mechanics in Unity are extremely derivative and not at all innovative

Furthermore, the AI is dumb. The DUMBEST I've seen in any modern video game. Search routines are a joke. The crowd and the guards simply are two disconnected systems. ACU is easily the most archaic AC game when it comes down to the game systems. I felt more capable as an Assassin in Revelations and Black Flags than in ACU.

ACU may not be the worst out of them all, but its the last straw for me.

Ubi needs to sort out its AC design team...or maybe its leadership....IDK....because ACU was a mediocre game.

Gimme 2 months and complete control over Ubisoft Global and I'll un**** this straight away. I'm Batman.
By combat being 'amped up' do you mean made more flashy and incredibly easy? Not a great innovation. Crowds were cool, but so simplistic and gamey they didn't really matter.

The AI was stupid yes, but hardly any dumber than past games. Are we forgetting AC4 where you can pop in and out of a bush multiple times right in front if a guard and he doesn't detect you?

And by more capable do you mean easier? Fact of the matter is there was no use to stealth in previous games because the combat was so easy. Unity has the most open mission design in the series and secret entrances, unique kills and generally plenty of ways to do everything. Most importantly, combat wasn't a breeze and was genuinely your last resort. The mechanics are flawed but the assassination missions of Unity are easily the best Assassin experience the series has provided.

I'm not even Unity's biggest fan, I still think the stealth is bad (however I still find some satisfaction in pulling off assassinations due to the design) but in comparison to the past games it's unquestionably a better stealth game. I too am bitterly disappointed that after so many attempts the game still isn't even a COMPETENT stealth/action game never mind a good one, but the fact that Unity is a big step in the right direction gives me hope after years of enduring the focus on action and set pieces. Heck, why quit now rather than at the absolute abomination that was AC3? I have hope that Victory will refine the mechanics and be a better version of Unity. We've seen it before, when the high-concept, ambitious title is more like a testing ground for future sequels -- Brotherhood (although AC2 was actually a successful test of concept, but BH improved on that ten-fold) and AC4 for example.

shobhit7777777
01-09-2015, 10:13 AM
By combat being 'amped up' do you mean made more flashy and incredibly easy? Not a great innovation. Crowds were cool, but so simplistic and gamey they didn't really matter.

Whether you like them or not is irrelevant. Point is major mechanical changes and additions were brought in with the Ezio trilogy


And by more capable do you mean easier?

"Capable" here implies the fact that I had a plethora of options when it came to deathdealing.


The AI was stupid yes, but hardly any dumber than past games. Are we forgetting AC4 where you can pop in and out of a bush multiple times right in front if a guard and he doesn't detect you?

Yup. AI has always been stupid. And Unity - the "next gen" title doesn't improve on it and in fact goes back a few steps. You do see how that could put off a long time fan, don't you.


Unity has the most open mission design in the series and secret entrances, unique kills and generally plenty of ways to do everything. Most importantly, combat wasn't a breeze and was genuinely your last resort. The mechanics are flawed but the assassination missions of Unity are easily the best Assassin experience the series has provided.

Too little too late. What IS presented is flawed. Many elements are extremely derivative...what was standard in other stealth-action games comes to the franchise now...and it not even properly implemented.

The Assassination missions are indeed fantastic. However, the core gameplay is shallow. The unsystemic nature of the game cheapens everything. The mechanical flaws sap the fun out of it all. Unity is a GOTY on paper.

Also, if you want THE assassin experience - tackle the Revelation's Templar dens. I found it be above and beyond anything else in the franchise when it comes to the assassin sim concept....only Black Flag's Kingston/Havana assassination contracts come close to it.



I too am bitterly disappointed that after so many attempts the game still isn't even a COMPETENT stealth/action game never mind a good one, but the fact that Unity is a big step in the right direction gives me hope after years of enduring the focus on action and set pieces

Something we can agree on.

Believe me, I was the BIGGEST Revelations hater. It was only after AC3 that I realized how awesome ACR was. Revisiting ACR and exploring the core gameplay and bomb crafting in the sandboxes of the Tempar Dens redeemed the horrible campaign missions.

Yes, Unity IS a step in the right direction....but its a deeply flawed game. So much so that its robbed me of any confidence I had in Ubi. Watch Dogs may have been a catalyst. I pre-ordered Unity, thinking they have nailed it. I was dead wrong. I've lost all excitement for the franchise because Ubisoft has just failed to deliver.

Shahkulu101
01-09-2015, 11:01 AM
Whether you like them or not is irrelevant. Point is major mechanical changes and additions were brought in with the Ezio trilogy



"Capable" here implies the fact that I had a plethora of options when it came to deathdealing.



Yup. AI has always been stupid. And Unity - the "next gen" title doesn't improve on it and in fact goes back a few steps. You do see how that could put off a long time fan, don't you.



Too little too late. What IS presented is flawed. Many elements are extremely derivative...what was standard in other stealth-action games comes to the franchise now...and it not even properly implemented.

The Assassination missions are indeed fantastic. However, the core gameplay is shallow. The unsystemic nature of the game cheapens everything. The mechanical flaws sap the fun out of it all. Unity is a GOTY on paper.

Also, if you want THE assassin experience - tackle the Revelation's Templar dens. I found it be above and beyond anything else in the franchise when it comes to the assassin sim concept....only Black Flag's Kingston/Havana assassination contracts come close to it.




Something we can agree on.

Believe me, I was the BIGGEST Revelations hater. It was only after AC3 that I realized how awesome ACR was. Revisiting ACR and exploring the core gameplay and bomb crafting in the sandboxes of the Tempar Dens redeemed the horrible campaign missions.

Yes, Unity IS a step in the right direction....but its a deeply flawed game. So much so that its robbed me of any confidence I had in Ubi. Watch Dogs may have been a catalyst. I pre-ordered Unity, thinking they have nailed it. I was dead wrong. I've lost all excitement for the franchise because Ubisoft has just failed to deliver.

Okay, I understand why you'd be put off now. However we all know you'll end up picking up Victory anyway... :rolleyes:

Regarding ACR, I've always viewed the bombs as a nuisance and never used them. I'll definitely experiment with them the next time I replay it, but I do find crafting them a real hassle to be honest. The Den's were certainly fun to do in any case though.

shobhit7777777
01-09-2015, 11:19 AM
Okay, I understand why you'd be put off now. However we all know you'll end up picking up Victory anyway... :rolleyes:
.

I doubt I'll be picking up Victory. I don't think it'll be a major improvement over Unity. The issues I have with Unity require serious design changes...and I don't think Ubi can be bothered with them. I'll probably play Victory when its super cheap...on PC.


Regarding ACR, I've always viewed the bombs as a nuisance and never used them. I'll definitely experiment with them the next time I replay it, but I do find crafting them a real hassle to be honest. The Den's were certainly fun to do in any case though.

The bomb system has some serious issues.

For one the different gunpowders don't really do anything....and only become useful when you're using the Datura powder (Poison gas)...to limit the lethal radius (civillians). Some of the effects were redundant. Blood/Caltrops/Smoke were near interchangeable. The system could've used some streamlining.

However, the ability to decide the effect, the shell/fuse was indeed amazing and offered tremendous tactical freedom. From using the skunk bomb to distract and isolate targets to using a the noiseless smoke bomb to distract a particular set of guards. You keep finding new uses and ways.

Many people say that the Blowpipe and darts etc. make bombs redundant but its not the case

ACR had mines, delayed fuses, bouncing shells, different effects....and the kicker was that all of them could be used to not only manipulate the crowd and AI...but also be used incognito...the perfect social stealth weapon.

Blowpipes weren't that flexible

Jazz117Volkov
01-09-2015, 08:33 PM
@Dieinthedark
Yeah, I agree bro, I've been out of the series since Brotherhood, and my return to this... amusement park of a product (I say product deliberately, this is hardly a game) has not been positive or particularly pleasant. I'm not boycotting Ubisoft, or announcing my abandonment of the series, such things are much too definite for my liking. There's no reason to assume I won't one day return to the series again, if it's still around. But to my thought.

edit: sorry dude, I think I broke your 'no rant' rule.

@Ubisoft
We... need to talk.

Assassin's Creed Unity is the most diluted, irritating, unsatisfactory mess of poorly executed ideas and broken gameplay I've experienced in recent memory, and I don't say that lightly.

Let me break it down.

The combat:
It's broken. Simple as that. Your inputs are all messed up, the responsiveness is atrocious, the counter system is defunct, Arno randomly disengages, takes cover instead of dodging, and the list goes on. How did this make it through QA? It's not like the industry doesn't have a plethora of reference material. The freeflow gorge-the-horde gameplay from Shadow of Mordor, or the tightly tuned duels from Dark Souls, both feel and function a lot better to the mess I've labored through in Unity.

It's not all bad, when the animations trigger right, and the counters respond, it's a fairly intense and empowering experience. Shall we say, good sometimes? I don't know, feels a lot like each of the core pillars were designed and developed by isolated teams, then welded together with java script by the guy who sweeps the floors on Tuesdays. The button inputs keeps tripping over each other, and the AI toolset asks more questions than you have answers for. In the end, it's basically smoke bomb to win, or press dodge to take cover and get hit with an axe to die.

Indoor Stealth:
Okay, I get it, you want me to skulk around like Sam Fisher. Well, spoilers, I didn't buy this because I wanted Splinter Cell. In a word, or six, rather: Assassin's Creed is not Splinter Cell. The cover system is hopeless. Responsive? Sure. So responsive it works in a sword fight (wtf?). The crouch in the corridors formula ripped from the hands of more competent games like Splinter Cell Conviction, does not function or belong in Assassin's Creed. This is an IP founded on the notion of being a blade in a crowd. That's the gameplay I want. The phantom white hood that brings death from a sea of unwitting allies. Sam Fishing your way through a mansion to cover-grab your target in a dull corner of his office is absolutely not why I was initially interested in this series. It's not why I bought this game.

For the love of God, go back to the roots, re-evaluate what makes the Assassin's Creed IP. Half-baked cover... did I mention there's cover-to-cover? Well there, I mentioned it in the same capacity as its execution (FFS). Stealth in tiny enclosed spaces should not be a thing. It's not executed well, the AI doesn't support it at all--the AI doesn't support much of anything at all, really--and it majorly distracts from the actual Assassin's Creed experience that I want. Most of the game's missions take you across bland rooftops, through opened windows or across conveniently cover littered foyers, and up awkward stair cases and locked doors... omg the locks... ugh. And then finally to weirdly scripted kill the guy in the Splinter Cell patrol climaxes, which force you into super vague cut-scenes that attempt to make an excruciatingly bland plot slightly less excruciatingly bland.

Point is, please decide what game you're making. Stop advertising Assassin's Creed if you're going to sell me Splinter Cell lite with huge dumb crowds between the parts that don't have shadows, if you catch my drift.

The Crowds:
Kudos on rendering twenty thousand people. Shame they amount to little more than camouflage puddles in a sea of beautifully rendered 18th century mud. Dated mud is important, because reasons. Anyway, these seas of soulless brain-dead bipeds offer little-to-no strategic value in the big picture. The enemy AI is far to clumsy and linear for the crowds to be an effective tool for the player. Seriously, the AI will not recognize you if you're twiddling your thumbs in a group of three. But if they're fully alerted, they'll find you in a sea of fifty, and shoot you too, despite you running with everyone else. And they're a perceptive bunch, pulling some serious Sherlock Holmes bullsh!t out their arse in the five seconds proceeding the deed. I mean, could we build up to that? Escalation is a bit sudden is all I'm saying.

There's a thousand and one ways the game could utilize crowds. A little interaction for starters. This game is pulling setups that felt dated in Assassin's Creed 2. Help random civilian Johnny Pea, and in return, he'll raise a ladder in a very specific place. Some emergence would be nice. How about some hood-play, take it off in a crowd of bare-heads and your stealth radius expands? Being able to run panicked with everyone and have it fool the enemy? Point the finger to a suspicious merc looking guy if a guard gets suspicious around a recent victim. That last one could be a stretch, but point is, the crowds have just expanded. They're seas of bodies, not crowds of people.

Blade in the crowd... yeah, okay.

Gear stats, skills, and customization:
Really? I can't get behind this. I see both sides of the coin, and even talked it over a bit with a few friends. But at the end of the day, I just don't like it. It's misdirection to disguise ultimately shallow gameplay. Get this, because it does that better. No, not really. Buy health upgrades to compensate the broken combat, and just wear what you think looks cool. Only, it's not that simple, because your equipment and ammo are governed by what your sleeves look like.

This is a Ubisoft trend that needs to come to an end. Splinter Cell Blacklist was plagued by it too. Stop messing with how I want my character to look. If I want lockpicks, grenades, or ammo, I can't use belt X, must be belt Y, D, or F. If I want stealth to work better, needs that jacket... I just do not want this. Let's bring that game back towards the skill, and less towards the stats. Instead of being so obsessed with four buttons doing forty things at indeterminate times, let's get some focus and direction up in here.

And why can't I have a rifle with my pistol and sword? Is that like a skill or some jacket locked thing?
I don't even care anymore.

Story and Narrative: (spoilers, naturally)
Arno doesn't feel like an Assassin. He's pulled into the order because redemption that I could never care about. At the behest of a guy who incessantly calls him "pisspot". Good God, you have no idea how much that got on my nerves. I enjoyed killing him. There was no emotional impact at all. Just another dead guy. Oh, and that "boss fight" was made so lol because of the combat mechanics. Arno randomly disengaging... ugh, so much for immersion.

Anyway, moving on. Plot was serviceable at best, disastrously obnoxious at worst, but mostly just vague. I haven't finished it yet, and honestly don't think I will at this point. The longer I spend away from the game, the more I lean towards general dislike, mixed with a bit of raw apathy.

Also, the coop is so disconnected from the main plot, but somehow feels more like it's about Assassin's and Templars. Meh, I can't be bothered to go on about it. Just bored of it. Uninteresting muck.

Launch issues: You know that I know that you know that I know. Not much more to say there, so I'll keep it simple. Don't do that again. That fiasco took all enthusiasm I had for the coop and turned it to ash in my hands. I was super looking forward to getting on and playing with a couple friends, but no, apparently that was too much to ask. Had to wait weeks before our games would even connect, and last time we played there was still connection issues. Don't you dare ask for sympathy. You're a multibillion dollar corporation, and your flagship franchise doesn't work on release. That is absalutely fcuking shameful.

Companion app: I now have to play a game to play a game? Immersion shattering corporate junk shoved in my face every minute of my game, and you have the hide to tell me how your little team of five something thousand people across who knows how many studios, fed with enough money to make Lucifer blush, can't aug animations to rep your complete playerbase? Jesus Christ, what are you smoking? Stop using my wallet as a charity service for games that almost don't suck.

Hell, I'm all done, and rather upset I left the Companion app BS till last. Really wanted to tear you a new one over that good and proper. And I didn't even make it to the problems with the parkour. Talking about this game is either really tiring, or engages my apathy disorder full-throttle. Either way, don't get the wrong idea, I don't hate you. I used to really like you. But perpetual disappointment has left its mark on my mood. I really do wish you luck in salvaging this series. If you succeed, I might read about it somewhere. If you don't, well, at least you'll know why.

shobhit7777777
01-09-2015, 09:18 PM
@Dieinthedark
Yeah, I agree bro, I've been out of the series since Brotherhood, and my return to this... amusement park of a product (I say product deliberately, this is hardly a game) has not been positive or particularly pleasant. I'm not boycotting Ubisoft, or announcing my abandonment of the series, such things are much too definite for my liking. There's no reason to assume I won't one day return to the series again, if it's still around. But to my thought.

edit: sorry dude, I think I broke your 'no rant' rule.

@Ubisoft
We... need to talk.

Assassin's Creed Unity is the most diluted, irritating, unsatisfactory mess of poorly executed ideas and broken gameplay I've experienced in recent memory, and I don't say that lightly.

Let me break it down.

The combat:
It's broken. Simple as that. Your inputs are all messed up, the responsiveness is atrocious, the counter system is defunct, Arno randomly disengages, takes cover instead of dodging, and the list goes on. How did this make it through QA? It's not like the industry doesn't have a plethora of reference material. The freeflow gorge-the-horde gameplay from Shadow of Mordor, or the tightly tuned duels from Dark Souls, both feel and function a lot better to the mess I've labored through in Unity.

It's not all bad, when the animations trigger right, and the counters respond, it's a fairly intense and empowering experience. Shall we say, good sometimes? I don't know, feels a lot like each of the core pillars were designed and developed by isolated teams, then welded together with java script by the guy who sweeps the floors on Tuesdays. The button inputs keeps tripping over each other, and the AI toolset asks more questions than you have answers for. In the end, it's basically smoke bomb to win, or press dodge to take cover and get hit with an axe to die.

Indoor Stealth:
Okay, I get it, you want me to skulk around like Sam Fisher. Well, spoilers, I didn't buy this because I wanted Splinter Cell. In a word, or six, rather: Assassin's Creed is not Splinter Cell. The cover system is hopeless. Responsive? Sure. So responsive it works in a sword fight (wtf?). The crouch in the corridors formula ripped from the hands of more competent games like Splinter Cell Conviction, does not function or belong in Assassin's Creed. This is an IP founded on the notion of being a blade in a crowd. That's the gameplay I want. The phantom white hood that brings death from a sea of unwitting allies. Sam Fishing your way through a mansion to cover-grab your target in a dull corner of his office is absolutely not why I was initially interested in this series. It's not why I bought this game.

For the love of God, go back to the roots, re-evaluate what makes the Assassin's Creed IP. Half-baked cover... did I mention there's cover-to-cover? Well there, I mentioned it in the same capacity as its execution (FFS). Stealth in tiny enclosed spaces should not be a thing. It's not executed well, the AI doesn't support it at all--the AI doesn't support much of anything at all, really--and it majorly distracts from the actual Assassin's Creed experience that I want. Most of the game's missions take you across bland rooftops, through opened windows or across conveniently cover littered foyers, and up awkward stair cases and locked doors... omg the locks... ugh. And then finally to weirdly scripted kill the guy in the Splinter Cell patrol climaxes, which force you into super vague cut-scenes that attempt to make an excruciatingly bland plot slightly less excruciatingly bland.

Point is, please decide what game you're making. Stop advertising Assassin's Creed if you're going to sell me Splinter Cell lite with huge dumb crowds between the parts that don't have shadows, if you catch my drift.

The Crowds:
Kudos on rendering twenty thousand people. Shame they amount to little more than camouflage puddles in a sea of beautifully rendered 18th century mud. Dated mud is important, because reasons. Anyway, these seas of soulless brain-dead bipeds offer little-to-no strategic value in the big picture. The enemy AI is far to clumsy and linear for the crowds to be an effective tool for the player. Seriously, the AI will not recognize you if you're twiddling your thumbs in a group of three. But if they're fully alerted, they'll find you in a sea of fifty, and shoot you too, despite you running with everyone else. And they're a perceptive bunch, pulling some serious Sherlock Holmes bullsh!t out their arse in the five seconds proceeding the deed. I mean, could we build up to that? Escalation is a bit sudden is all I'm saying.

There's a thousand and one ways the game could utilize crowds. A little interaction for starters. This game is pulling setups that felt dated in Assassin's Creed 2. Help random civilian Johnny Pea, and in return, he'll raise a ladder in a very specific place. Some emergence would be nice. How about some hood-play, take it off in a crowd of bare-heads and your stealth radius expands? Being able to run panicked with everyone and have it fool the enemy? Point the finger to a suspicious merc looking guy if a guard gets suspicious around a recent victim. That last one could be a stretch, but point is, the crowds have just expanded. They're seas of bodies, not crowds of people.

Blade in the crowd... yeah, okay.

Gear stats, skills, and customization:
Really? I can't get behind this. I see both sides of the coin, and even talked it over a bit with a few friends. But at the end of the day, I just don't like it. It's misdirection to disguise ultimately shallow gameplay. Get this, because it does that better. No, not really. Buy health upgrades to compensate the broken combat, and just wear what you think looks cool. Only, it's not that simple, because your equipment and ammo are governed by what your sleeves look like.

This is a Ubisoft trend that needs to come to an end. Splinter Cell Blacklist was plagued by it too. Stop messing with how I want my character to look. If I want lockpicks, grenades, or ammo, I can't use belt X, must be belt Y, D, or F. If I want stealth to work better, needs that jacket... I just do not want this. Let's bring that game back towards the skill, and less towards the stats. Instead of being so obsessed with four buttons doing forty things at indeterminate times, let's get some focus and direction up in here.

And why can't I have a rifle with my pistol and sword? Is that like a skill or some jacket locked thing?
I don't even care anymore.

Story and Narrative: (spoilers, naturally)
Arno doesn't feel like an Assassin. He's pulled into the order because redemption that I could never care about. At the behest of a guy who incessantly calls him "pisspot". Good God, you have no idea how much that got on my nerves. I enjoyed killing him. There was no emotional impact at all. Just another dead guy. Oh, and that "boss fight" was made so lol because of the combat mechanics. Arno randomly disengaging... ugh, so much for immersion.

Anyway, moving on. Plot was serviceable at best, disastrously obnoxious at worst, but mostly just vague. I haven't finished it yet, and honestly don't think I will at this point. The longer I spend away from the game, the more I lean towards general dislike, mixed with a bit of raw apathy.

Also, the coop is so disconnected from the main plot, but somehow feels more like it's about Assassin's and Templars. Meh, I can't be bothered to go on about it. Just bored of it. Uninteresting muck.

Launch issues: You know that I know that you know that I know. Not much more to say there, so I'll keep it simple. Don't do that again. That fiasco took all enthusiasm I had for the coop and turned it to ash in my hands. I was super looking forward to getting on and playing with a couple friends, but no, apparently that was too much to ask. Had to wait weeks before our games would even connect, and last time we played there was still connection issues. Don't you dare ask for sympathy. You're a multibillion dollar corporation, and your flagship franchise doesn't work on release. That is absalutely fcuking shameful.

Companion app: I now have to play a game to play a game? Immersion shattering corporate junk shoved in my face every minute of my game, and you have the hide to tell me how your little team of five something thousand people across who knows how many studios, fed with enough money to make Lucifer blush, can't aug animations to rep your complete playerbase? Jesus Christ, what are you smoking? Stop using my wallet as a charity service for games that almost don't suck.

Hell, I'm all done, and rather upset I left the Companion app BS till last. Really wanted to tear you a new one over that good and proper. And I didn't even make it to the problems with the parkour. Talking about this game is either really tiring, or engages my apathy disorder full-throttle. Either way, don't get the wrong idea, I don't hate you. I used to really like you. But perpetual disappointment has left its mark on my mood. I really do wish you luck in salvaging this series. If you succeed, I might read about it somewhere. If you don't, well, at least you'll know why.


Beautiful

Everything I've ever wanted to say about Unity.

The best post I've read this year (2014..and perhaps even 2015)

SolidSage
01-10-2015, 02:51 AM
Lots of relevant and mostly well deserved criticism. Its true. But I don't agree with the harshness of it...mostly.

In regard to companion app, locked content, club competitions, readiness for release, quality assurance, testing, and general false advertising/marketing, yes, Ubisoft completely screwed the pooch on this one. It's impossible to not see how share prices has turned Ubisoft into a pretty bad Publisher over the last two years. Bad releases, bad optimization and ports, TONS of glitches in every game and dismal to no support at all in some cases. It's definite a dark period in the history of my personal favorite Publisher of the last decade. Things are going wrong in a big way, and it has so much to do with, it appears, the marketing pitches and release schedules.
Developers in the trenches are not to fault here, rushing games out of the the door long before they are ready is.

So I understand all the anger and apathy.

That said, Assassins Creed has striven for a long time to achieve evolution of it's core design, a lot of the time it seems any design advances were just forgotten about in the next entry, steps forward were then steps back in the next game and so on. The strongest advance really was the ship work set, not that its necessarily the right place for it in AC, but it was a real and legitimate step forward. The swimming in Black Flag was cool too. But generally, beyond that, from a mechanical standpoint, every advance has been a rewrite of existing tech, a different approach to something we've already had for a long time. And while it's been fun, it is wearing thin.
So, having said that I need to explain why I disagree with a lot of the disgust or dismay with Unity.

IMO, in regard to the design of the mechanics of parkour, combat, climbing and mission design, ACUnity is equal to or better than any Assassin's Creed I have played. It just is.
Parkour has weak surface contact consistency, sometimes Arno just seems to skate over the roofscape, but the work of parkour now is so much more engaging again, and surpasses AC1. There is a ton you can do with it, and even though some areas are difficult, like window entries and back ejects, the mechanics for them ARE solid and CONSISTENT. The player has to apply him/herself, figure out how they actually work and commit to performing those moves accurately every time. It's easy to blame it on the game for being too hard but without too hard you get AC3 parkour and you might as well just be asleep or dead with your thumb on the buttons.
It needs refining but Unity's Parkour is the best yet and holds a lot of potential.

Combat may be a chore because shooters and how they are identified and dealt with needs refinement, and it does lead to SMOKE bomb to win (or beserk dart, or poison smoke or, and this is my personal favorite for the skill arc, Dodge like a flippin champion. It can be done...until that one shooter off camera doesn't even generate a warning reticule, then you are shafted). The parry is great and it depends on your weapon to its effectiveness. There are control inconsistencies because some buttons do multiple things and the player will find themselves entering cover instead of whatever it was they wanted to do, and the auto engage/disengage is nothing but a problem child who likes to rip control out of the players hand at every turn. But it can be accounted for, the second it happens use your free aim or run. It's not hard, it's just a pain because it destroys the flow. So combat has problems and the fact the game was broke as all get out at release only compounded this.
But again, this new combat, while missing some depth (empty hand) and in desperate need of refinement, has by design, improved AC and returned its combat to the form of yesteryear. The difficulty is there again (not because of glitches), challenge has returned to the fight. There's promise here, especially if you consider that this combat may have been developed to accommodate PvP sword fights at an imminent juncture (Victory?).

Climbing has been expanded. Window entries are cool, controlled descent is excellent, the player control has been increased. There is perhaps an abundance of active surfaces that lead to confusion at times, and Unity doesn't try to make every hand hold pop out for the eye, but these are things some fans might appreciate as much as I do.

Mission Design surely needs little effort on my part for others to acknowledge it's quality. Black box design is great. Full interiors. Sure the story missions were a bit whatever, but murder mysteries appealed greatly to some (not me), while social club missions were great for others (me), and then of course coop missions were a blast.


What I'm getting at is that its easy to dismiss all of the hard work and great design that is in Unity. It's easy for it all to be overshadowed by the horrible glitches, the mess of release and the dismal and disgusting ploy to grab some more cash from the consumer. Its disappointing for sure, Unity held a lot of promise for the game it was supposed to be and it pretty much failed all over. It didn't meet expectations and even worse, it was simply broken for a long time.
As someone who has played all of these games forever, I still really enjoyed my time with it. It wasn't THAT broken for me. I experienced a lot of issues, and I think Arno thinking he needs to leap from a curb onto a chair is such an old gripe that SURELY someone would have fixed it by now. I played it for a month and was quite into it. I played the companion app and stayed positive throughout, even enjoyed it for a while.
But now, I don't play Unity anymore. it feels super repetitive, compounded by franchise fatigue. The randomly spawning occurrences are miserable, they happen so frequently and are SO the same that I can't be bothered. The grind of the club comps is such a joke that I no longer even care about the gear I was grinding to get. And the coop missions aren't enough I guess. There needs to be more to do in free roam and more special random occurrences and a lot of variety there.

But the game is beautiful, the mechanical design is good work (the implementation is a mess), the crowds are great even if bit of a pain and in need of more uses, the stealth profile is a massive upgrade (which needs expanding so it works well all the time). There is too much good design in Unity for it to be so easily dismissed as worthless. As a stand alone game, if it worked and didn't have the locked content requirements, it would be just as good as any creed, and better because of the coop and improved stealth, better parkour and AC1 like challenge to the combat. As an entry in the franchise its an embarrassment because how can it have been released in such a state.
But when I compare it to Black Flag, it is far superior. Sure, BF had a fantastic story (at least in parts) and it worked well and looked great but on a mechanical game play level I have never been so bored by an AC. I could run around every location and wipe out guards with little to no resistance, every map was so similar. The best challenge was in the ship battles and the under water swimming. The actual Assassin stuff was abysmal, tired and boring. I sat on my couch with a friend watching and literally was embarrassed by how the game was just merunning and holding a button and executing everyone I came across with ease. They literally just fall under the blade, even when full sprinting from behind (no audible recognition at all?) It was a real "what is the actual point of all this?" moment. I'm short changing it for sure, but in comparison to what Unity has done for mechanical advances, BF was much weaker, imo.

Unity is a great advance for AC. It should lead to great improvements. Sadly as a game in its own right, it's a big let down. Its weird to be for and against it at the same time. Strange to honestly feel its the best Assassins Creed yet (by design), but is not a game I want to play much. I think Assassin's Creed as franchise is missing an important upgrade to player engagement that a lot of new gen titles figured out long before Unity's release. And that misstep is a big one that could honestly hurt the franchise down the road.
Too many games have found a way to make the content engaging and motivating to play consistently. They figured out loops that have a lot of variety and random nature to them to make the experience worth repeating over and over. I think Unity tried for this but failed, and sadly, that has been true for Blacklist, Watch Dogs and maybe even FarCry4 (I haven't been compelled to play it that much so I'm not sure).

I may be tired of Ubisoft's formulas in these games but doesn't that mean that maybe Ubisoft has been pimping the same old bag of tricks (with a new coat of paint) for a bit too long, while falling a bit short on their new ideas for compelling game play loops?

- Blacklist traded old for new instead of expanding our tool sets (great game but it was just different, not better).
- Watch dogs incorporated new formula but implemented them poorly by design and Ubisoft's driving engine is...lets just say it stinks right now.
- Unity expanded the mechanics and re-designed everything to be better but then executed the whole shebang miserably.


There's too much let down in too many titles over a short period for fans to not feel burnt. I don't know where it goes from here but I'm not signing off of AC yet. I want to see where this goes, if it all changes AGAIN in Victory then I might be right there with you Die. If it improves upon these new foundations I might be reinvigorated.
No matter what happens, Ubisoft needs to improve the quality of their releases. I said this before, Unity needed to be tight or the fall out could be unrecoverable. Well Unity wasn't tight , it was loose as heck (in spite of having some of the best ideas and design to improve the brand) and now things are ugly all over.


Where do we go now, where do we go now, where do we go, ayyy ayy ayyyy, where do we gooooOOOOoooooOOOOooooOOOoooooooooOOOOOOoooo where do we go now?

SolidSage
01-10-2015, 02:53 AM
^TLDR
Don't blame you. Wall of confusion. I'm confused. Unity is really confused.

Jazz117Volkov
01-10-2015, 09:57 AM
Lots of relevant and mostly well deserved criticism. Its true. But I don't agree with the harshness of it...mostly.

In regard to companion app, locked content, club competitions, readiness for release, quality assurance, testing, and general false advertising/marketing, yes, Ubisoft completely screwed the pooch on this one. It's impossible to not see how share prices has turned Ubisoft into a pretty bad Publisher over the last two years. Bad releases, bad optimization and ports, TONS of glitches in every game and dismal to no support at all in some cases. It's definite a dark period in the history of my personal favorite Publisher of the last decade. Things are going wrong in a big way, and it has so much to do with, it appears, the marketing pitches and release schedules.
Developers in the trenches are not to fault here, rushing games out of the the door long before they are ready is.

So I understand all the anger and apathy.

Yep, if Ubisoft didn't piss in my cup and call it wine, I may feel differently about the final verdict. But as it is, idk... I'm just sick of being treated like garbage. This is my hobby, I love games, Ubisoft has been my go-to studio forever: the TC titles, AC, even Prince of Persia back when it was good. But now, dropping $100 on a new game is like paying for defunct prototypes. Just tired of it. And the bullsh!t of it is, the poor devs who slave away on these games have to bend over for their corporate overlords, and take the broad blunt backlash from their angry fanbase. No wonder so many of'em have up and left. I wouldn't put up with this sh!t either.


There's too much let down in too many titles over a short period for fans to not feel burnt. I don't know where it goes from here but I'm not signing off of AC yet. I want to see where this goes, if it all changes AGAIN in Victory then I might be right there with you Die. If it improves upon these new foundations I might be reinvigorated.
No matter what happens, Ubisoft needs to improve the quality of their releases. I said this before, Unity needed to be tight or the fall out could be unrecoverable. Well Unity wasn't tight , it was loose as heck (in spite of having some of the best ideas and design to improve the brand) and now things are ugly all over.

Yeah, Watchdogs was a pile of smouldering garbage, shallow, shafted, and uninspired. Another one of Ubi's amusement parks dressed as a video game. Well, you know how I feel about Blacklist. And yeah, now Unity. Comes a point where you see that you're being leached off. I'm not even angry, just really disappointed and disheartened.

And the Parkour isn't bad, but it's failings are gamebreaking at times. Like when you get detected because the game sticks you on a guard rail, but refuses to let you step off. That's just not okay.


Where do we go now, where do we go now, where do we go, ayyy ayy ayyyy, where do we gooooOOOOoooooOOOOooooOOOoooooooooOOOOOOoooo where do we go now?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMJBlg3nA3s

FrankieSatt
01-10-2015, 05:45 PM
I'm not saying yet that I'm done with the franchise but I have to say that I bought the game on Day 1 and I have done very little in the game as far as Arno Missions. I tried to get interested in it but for some reason I just can't. The story line itself just isn't very good so far and there is no current day story line to speak of. I think that is what made the previous AC games interesting because you not only has the historical story line but you also had the current day story line and those 2 together made the whole game. You had Desmond and you had the historical character he was reliving through the animus. Once they killed off Desmond they killed off half the game.

Now compare that to Far Cry 4. I also bought that Day 1 and I played it from start to finish. It's a "Game of the Year" candidate for sure. The game play was great, the story line was great and most of all they stuck with what worked in Far Cry 1, Far Cry 2 and in Far Cry 3. There hasn't been a bad game in the Far Cry series, you can't say that about the AC series. You can't say that about the Splinter Cell series.

The thing is I don't think there is anything that can be done with the AC series to make it any better. The historical story lines that keep moving more and more forward in time just aren't as interesting as the historical story lines that were in the far past. Also, without a current day story line to link to the historical story line you only have half a game, in m y opinion.

I'm going to make it all the way through AC Unity, even if I have to force myself to do it. However, unless there are drastic changes to the story line further along in the game I will just be going through the paces and once done I'll be done with this series. After ACIII when they killed off Desmond this is the type of game that I was worried about. Black Flag at the very least had somewhat of a current day story line to connect to the historical one, Unity has none so far.

KJC_Obi-Wan
01-10-2015, 09:10 PM
I completely agree with you @dieinthedark

A great review, though like others I can't give up on the AC franchise this fast, I've been involved with it for too long for that.
I'm just hoping Ubisoft will make a sharp turn soon.
By the way I don't think it doesn't matter to you if people agree or disagree. If all people disagree then the work you have put in your post would have been for nothing.
I hope that some of the developers will read your post aswell.



Anyway, does anyone know, if there is an official "give your reviews for Unity" thread somewhere?

There was an official one started by blackwidow for Black Flag, so it would be sad if there was none for Unity.


After all, I'm still hoping that at least some of the developers read our threads so that they can improve on their games, based on our feedback...

shobhit7777777
01-11-2015, 07:51 AM
But now, dropping $100 on a new game is like paying for defunct prototypes. Just tired of it. And the bullsh!t of it is, the poor devs who slave away on these games have to bend over for their corporate overlords, and take the broad blunt backlash from their angry fanbase. No wonder so many of'em have up and left. I wouldn't put up with this sh!t either.



Yeah, Watchdogs was a pile of smouldering garbage, shallow, shafted, and uninspired. Another one of Ubi's amusement parks dressed as a video game. Well, you know how I feel about Blacklist. And yeah, now Unity. Comes a point where you see that you're being leached off. I'm not even angry, just really disappointed and disheartened.

And the Parkour isn't bad, but it's failings are gamebreaking at times. Like when you get detected because the game sticks you on a guard rail, but refuses to let you step off. That's just not okay.




100 AUD!!!

:eek:

Thats a lot of money.

ERICATHERINE
01-11-2015, 04:35 PM
From my point of view, I think the ac game that have been developing story the less :
#1 the modern day is ac liberation hd (with only a mail from erudito).
#2 the story of the past is ac iii : the thyrany of king Washington, since the story is sort of taking place in a parrallel world (but I like the story anyway ^-^).

Also, I think the video that have been developing the story the less is ac ascendance.

ERICATHERINE
01-11-2015, 04:38 PM
Sorry I cliked the wrong tread.

iancreed
01-11-2015, 04:57 PM
And Haitian revolution with Eseosa? Could be interesting, we could meet Connor and that would be a connection to a revenge for Adewale

Bigodon
01-11-2015, 06:27 PM
i think there is a serious problem with ubisoft employed and people who is responsible for their game direction

watch dogs show to us the most dumbest poorly crafted minigame of the all time... who remember the drink game (without patch) its just awful and reflect their decisions and bad choices when designing a game. ACU for me was just the crown, i don't ever need to repeat what you guys alread said and i blame on other threads... but to be honest, this just show how someone can fck so badly something with poor ideas and design.

this also not from now, previously AC games suffer from a major lack of creativity... or we can just close our eyes to the insane amount of "follow the target" , "tail the target" , "protect or kill the target" missions? the sad in this is those people are just egocentric enough to not listen what we like, hate and wanted, it's hard to believe there are nobody at ubi to point finger in face of these people and say: this is not good, your idea is crappy, redo this. Why? well, just see this topic and our complains, nothing change for so long and made us quiting from play ac.

joelsantos24
01-11-2015, 09:19 PM
I'm confused, how can there be any relevant constructive feedback, when one is "done" with AC to begin with?

shobhit7777777
01-12-2015, 07:17 AM
I'm confused, how can there be any relevant constructive feedback, when one is "done" with AC to begin with?

Doesn't preclude one from giving worthwhile feedback.

Zafar1981
01-12-2015, 07:52 AM
Well I played Assassin's Creed game because of sword fighting. But since AC 3 was released guns are becoming powerful and start damaging the game play. I don't care about the glitches or patches but playing Unity doesn't feel like you are playing an Assassin game.

To be honest I am now just waiting for Patrice new title and have no anticipation for AC Victory.

Fatal-Feit
01-12-2015, 09:55 AM
Well I played Assassin's Creed game because of sword fighting. But since AC 3 was released guns are becoming powerful and start damaging the game play. I don't care about the glitches or patches but playing Unity doesn't feel like you are playing an Assassin game.

Guns have been plaguing the franchise since 2/Brotherhood.

The Hidden Pistol is more OP than anything in the recent titles.

Megas_Doux
01-12-2015, 03:54 PM
I agree with you in many things, however the next two baffle me a little bit:




Indoor Stealth:

Okay, I get it, you want me to skulk around like Sam Fisher. Well, spoilers, I didn't buy this because I wanted Splinter Cell. In a word, or six, rather: Assassin's Creed is not Splinter Cell. The cover system is hopeless. Responsive? Sure. So responsive it works in a sword fight (wtf?). The crouch in the corridors formula ripped from the hands of more competent games like Splinter Cell Conviction, does not function or belong in Assassin's Creed. This is an IP founded on the notion of being a blade in a crowd. That's the gameplay I want. The phantom white hood that brings death from a sea of unwitting allies. Sam Fishing your way through a mansion to cover-grab your target in a dull corner of his office is absolutely not why I was initially interested in this series. It's not why I bought this game.

For the love of God, go back to the roots, re-evaluate what makes the Assassin's Creed IP. Half-baked cover... did I mention there's cover-to-cover? Well there, I mentioned it in the same capacity as its execution (FFS). Stealth in tiny enclosed spaces should not be a thing. It's not executed well, the AI doesn't support it at all--the AI doesn't support much of anything at all, really--and it majorly distracts from the actual Assassin's Creed experience that I want. Most of the game's missions take you across bland rooftops, through opened windows or across conveniently cover littered foyers, and up awkward stair cases and locked doors... omg the locks... ugh. And then finally to weirdly scripted kill the guy in the Splinter Cell patrol climaxes, which force you into super vague cut-scenes that attempt to make an excruciatingly bland plot slightly less excruciatingly bland.



Are you truly complaining about the presence -not just the execution- of some PRETTY basic mechanics that have existed in ANY stealth game -which AC is to an extent- since Metal Gear Solid in the likes cover and crouch????

Opinions I know, but to me Unity is a return -an attempt at least- to the roots of being an assassin gameplay wise...Because with the exception of the tree running, the CORE mechanics have remained the SAME since AC I until now. Not saying everything was perfect, quite the contrary in fact, but I like the overall direction, again, gameplay wise..........






Gear stats, skills, and customization:
Really? I can't get behind this. I see both sides of the coin, and even talked it over a bit with a few friends. But at the end of the day, I just don't like it. It's misdirection to disguise ultimately shallow gameplay. Get this, because it does that better. No, not really. Buy health upgrades to compensate the broken combat, and just wear what you think looks cool. Only, it's not that simple, because your equipment and ammo are governed by what your sleeves look like.





I really dont consider that a bad trend or anything, therefore I dont understand what is to complain about it. In fact, I liked customization, stats do matter for the first time and I enjoy being able to create a character of my own in the likes of medieval outfits, musketeers of the XVII century to more contemporary ones of the later XVIII century....Which again, happens in thousands of games like Metal Gear 3: Snake Eater, Skyrim and such................



Beautiful

Everything I've ever wanted to say about Unity.

The best post I've read this year (2014..and perhaps even 2015)


In my humble opinion, that would be this:

http://forums.ubi.com/showthread.php/961577-I-have-come-to-a-conclusion-about-Unity-%28no-spoilers%29



Well I played Assassin's Creed game because of sword fighting. But since AC 3 was released guns are becoming powerful and start damaging the game play. I don't care about the glitches or patches but playing Unity doesn't feel like you are playing an Assassin game.

To be honest I am now just waiting for Patrice new title and have no anticipation for AC Victory.


Being honest, unless you equip the upper ones in Unity, your average "regular" pistol in that game is WAY less overpowered than Ezioīs hidden pistol, mostly in ACB and ACR.........

Jazz117Volkov
01-12-2015, 04:40 PM
Are you truly complaining about the presence -not just the execution- of some PRETTY basic mechanics that have existed in ANY stealth game -which AC is to an extent- since Metal Gear Solid in the likes cover and crouch????

Opinions I know, but to me Unity is a return -an attempt at least- to the roots of being an assassin gameplay wise...Because with the exception of the tree running, the CORE mechanics have remained the SAME since AC I until now. Not saying everything was perfect, quite the contrary in fact, but I like the overall direction, again, gameplay wise..........

Inclusion, execution... even the way it looks and plays, aren't the real problems... the way it plays is a problem though, but I could overlook it if there wasn't a glaring hole in the game's fundamental architecture. And that is, quite simply, the game uses this very basic form of corridor stealth as a crutch because there is no depth to the crowd gameplay. The Assassin Experience is left as an idea, and we're asked repeatedly by the game to skulk around mansions in the dark because that idea is underdeveloped to the point of feeling like "gameplay diversity". The development driving feature you found an IP on shouldn't ever feel like "gameplay diversity".

You know, Assassin's Creed, in my experience, hasn't properly pursued crowd gameplay since its first outing--the original game. That unique breed of stealth it shot for has remained at the same level of incomplete for something like six games. The only progress I've seen made in the gameplay is incorporating traditional stealth abilities into the crowd environment--take abductions for example. But the crowd environment themselves haven't evolved much.

Though, kudos to Unity for, in the first time in Assassin's Creed history, actually making crowd assassinations work and feel good. Slipping between civilians and taking an enemy down with the hidden blade is great... but under utilized, under developed, ignored by the narrative, gimped by the binary AI and crowd stealth mechanics, and perhaps most unfortunately, wouldn't change the game's core experience if it wasn't there at all.

Again, the corridor stealth is a real issue because of where the limelight falls. The game is a shallow, mediocre mess of mechanics found in much more competent games. When compared against something like Metal Gear Solid, or Splinter Cell, Unity falls flat. But it also falls flat when compared to the Assassin's Creed idea. It doesn't make it. We're left with a game that hobbles under a desk, petrified of its identity, and sucking at almost everything it tries to do, except, not so ironically, running away.


I really dont consider that a bad trend or anything, therefore I dont understand what is to complain about it. In fact, I liked customization, stats do matter for the first time and I enjoy being able to create a character of my own in the likes of medieval outfits, musketeers of the XVII century to more contemporary ones of the later XVIII century....Which again, happens in thousands of games like Metal Gear 3: Snake Eater, Skyrim and such................

I agree that this is a much more personal preference. Still, pisswater RPG elements forced into a game that should be able to stand on its own without them is never gonna be good in my book. We're looking at a game that hides behind contrived unlocks to hide how shallow it is.

The basic idea of having to balance your performance on account of stats isn't wholly horrible, it's that your cosmetics are locked to it. I don't want to wear item X just to have the stealth rating I desire. I want to wear item B, and get stealth rating X, because that's how I want to play, and that's how I want to look. Game's are supposed to be satisfying; this system prevents satisfaction on account of how it functions.

Do not want.

In case there's any confusion. I like customizing my gear, I like the selection... I could even live with having to work a bit to unlock higher tier gear. It's the stat locks, and the horrible chores involved in unlocking certain items that grind my gears.

joelsantos24
01-12-2015, 06:57 PM
Doesn't preclude one from giving worthwhile feedback.
I suppose so.


Inclusion, execution... even the way it looks and plays, aren't the real problems... the way it plays is a problem though, but I could overlook it if there wasn't a glaring hole in the game's fundamental architecture. And that is, quite simply, the game uses this very basic form of corridor stealth as a crutch because there is no depth to the crowd gameplay. The Assassin Experience is left as an idea, and we're asked repeatedly by the game to skulk around mansions in the dark because that idea is underdeveloped to the point of feeling like "gameplay diversity". The development driving feature you found an IP on shouldn't ever feel like "gameplay diversity".

You know, Assassin's Creed, in my experience, hasn't properly pursued crowd gameplay since its first outing--the original game. That unique breed of stealth it shot for has remained at the same level of incomplete for something like six games. The only progress I've seen made in the gameplay is incorporating traditional stealth abilities into the crowd environment--take abductions for example. But the crowd environment themselves haven't evolved much.

Though, kudos to Unity for, in the first time in Assassin's Creed history, actually making crowd assassinations work and feel good. Slipping between civilians and taking an enemy down with the hidden blade is great... but under utilized, under developed, ignored by the narrative, gimped by the binary AI and crowd stealth mechanics, and perhaps most unfortunately, wouldn't change the game's core experience if it wasn't there at all.

Again, the corridor stealth is a real issue because of where the limelight falls. The game is a shallow, mediocre mess of mechanics found in much more competent games. When compared against something like Metal Gear Solid, or Splinter Cell, Unity falls flat. But it also falls flat when compared to the Assassin's Creed idea. It doesn't make it. We're left with a game that hobbles under a desk, petrified of its identity, and sucking at almost everything it tries to do, except, not so ironically, running away.
I generally agree.

Splinter Cell is one of my favorite series, so I have been playing stealth from the very beginning. Unity includes everything I have ever wanted in an AC game, more noteworthy, the stealth mode. Is it perfect? No, not by a long shot. But essentially, as a first real try at constructing a stealth mode, it was not that negative at all. The notion of the corridor stealth is meaningful, and it makes sense, quite simply because the series was always (over)focused on social stealth, without the slightest notion of physical stealth whatsoever. Crowd gameplay is not perfect, and it does have many issues, granted, but I am under the impression many tend to obsess about that handicap because the physical stealth is quite substantial, for the first time. Infiltrating is essential, and skulking around infrastructures, as you say, is an obvious meaningful component to an Assassin. As an Assassin, I would rather avoid crowds and attack my target in a more isolated and secluded location. That is logical. On the other hand, as AltaÔr said it, a skilled Assassin ensures his work is noted by the people, so the crowd gameplay should also be more developed, no doubt.

And yes, compared to SC, Unity doesn't stand a chance. The stealth mechanics, and overall gameplay, for that matter, fall utterly short of SC greatness. For instance, I have huge problems getting into cover structures, like closets, in order to escape an opponent. It does not feel fluid enough, or it is not fluid enough, rather. We are talking about the same company (Ubisoft), so please, AC developers, talk to your SC counterparts and get the notions right.


I agree that this is a much more personal preference. Still, pisswater RPG elements forced into a game that should be able to stand on its own without them is never gonna be good in my book. We're looking at a game that hides behind contrived unlocks to hide how shallow it is.

The basic idea of having to balance your performance on account of stats isn't wholly horrible, it's that your cosmetics are locked to it. I don't want to wear item X just to have the stealth rating I desire. I want to wear item B, and get stealth rating X, because that's how I want to play, and that's how I want to look. Game's are supposed to be satisfying; this system prevents satisfaction on account of how it functions.

Do not want.

In case there's any confusion. I like customizing my gear, I like the selection... I could even live with having to work a bit to unlock higher tier gear. It's the stat locks, and the horrible chores involved in unlocking certain items that grind my gears.
Your problem is that cosmetics are locked to stats? In this regard, I just do not understand where you are getting at.

Fatal-Feit
01-12-2015, 07:26 PM
Being honest, unless you equip the upper ones in Unity, your average "regular" pistol in that game is WAY less overpowered than Ezioīs hidden pistol, mostly in ACB and ACR.........

5 star pistols or not, nothing will ever trump Ezio's Hidden Pistol. It's too OP.

It was a weapon made by the gods.

Jazz117Volkov
01-12-2015, 07:42 PM
Your problem is that cosmetics are locked to stats? In this regard, I just do not understand where you are getting at.

Well, yes, my answer is in your question.

My problem is that cosmetics are stat locked. The game forces me to choose between how I want to look, and how I want to play... or rather, how optimized I want my stats to be for my playstyle, etc. The crowd-blend radius is super important.

It's not that I think gear having unique benefits is bad, or even a general stat-per-piece system is bad... give it to me in Dark Souls, and I love it. But here, it feels off. This should be a skill-based game, not RPG lite. It should be dependent on how you utilize gear, not what gear you carry. At least, that's what I would prefer.

The Tailored, Master, and Legendary tiers should be earned by the player, not bought with in-game currency. If you've completed X amount of activities, you achieve the Master Tier. Upon gaining that rank, you're given a finite number of points to spend on your stealth, ammo, lockpick capacity, health/armour, etc. I don't know, it could maybe let you respec whenever you want. And certain gear, like the musketeer belt, for example, could definitely give you bonus bullets, but it should feel like a 'bonus', not a requirement.

As it stands, I just feel the game's progression system is pretty poor and limiting, and not something I find very enjoyable.

I couldn't stand the way Splinter Cell Blacklist did it either.

a99_Zulu
01-13-2015, 12:59 AM
http://youtu.be/cSKdyasNeI4

joelsantos24
01-14-2015, 10:19 PM
Well, yes, my answer is in your question.

My problem is that cosmetics are stat locked. The game forces me to choose between how I want to look, and how I want to play... or rather, how optimized I want my stats to be for my playstyle, etc. The crowd-blend radius is super important.

It's not that I think gear having unique benefits is bad, or even a general stat-per-piece system is bad... give it to me in Dark Souls, and I love it. But here, it feels off. This should be a skill-based game, not RPG lite. It should be dependent on how you utilize gear, not what gear you carry. At least, that's what I would prefer.

The Tailored, Master, and Legendary tiers should be earned by the player, not bought with in-game currency. If you've completed X amount of activities, you achieve the Master Tier. Upon gaining that rank, you're given a finite number of points to spend on your stealth, ammo, lockpick capacity, health/armour, etc. I don't know, it could maybe let you respec whenever you want. And certain gear, like the musketeer belt, for example, could definitely give you bonus bullets, but it should feel like a 'bonus', not a requirement.

As it stands, I just feel the game's progression system is pretty poor and limiting, and not something I find very enjoyable.

I couldn't stand the way Splinter Cell Blacklist did it either.
So, let us say you would like to dress with a Brigand general outfit, but would like the Sans-culottes statistics (or stealth) instead? Is that it? I thought the current system made some sense, after all, the way you look, and how easily therefore you can or not blend with the crowd around you, is intimately linked to how stealthily you can move around. Do you not agree?

SOLIDSOUTHCENTRA
01-15-2015, 12:09 AM
Boy I swear you guys take these video games toooooo seriously. It is a fun game I enjoy it, but AC was never a game that I could play for hours until AC Unity.

Barrndawg
01-15-2015, 04:40 PM
http://youtu.be/cSKdyasNeI4

Haha I got this same glitch too. Except when it happened to me I jumped towards a wall, bounced off and started doing this.

rrebe
01-15-2015, 04:52 PM
Haha I got this same glitch too. Except when it happened to me I jumped towards a wall, bounced off and started doing this.

I once jumped out of a window meaning to land on the rooftop of the next house and got stuck.. My Arno just kept hovering in midair, completely unmoving and just blinking his eyes once in a while. It was hilarious :rolleyes:

KenTWOu
01-18-2015, 11:56 PM
So, let us say you would like to dress with a Brigand general outfit, but would like the Sans-culottes statistics (or stealth) instead? Is that it?
Jazz wants some kind of Splinter Cell:Conviction customization system. Where you can choose any outfit and change its stats (http://www.scaredscriptless.com/images/jason/sc5/PC_Akali/conviction_game%202010-05-17%2013-10-50-75.jpg). And I fully agree with him. Because Unity is a co-op game. It's not a competitive multiplayer, where you need to look at your enemy and figure out his stats from a great distance.