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repoman11
09-15-2004, 03:14 PM
I've never seen this site mentioned here before, but I may have just missed it.
http://pages.prodigy.com/fighterpilot/

Many great photos and stories. I saw the video they have for sale on PBS about 9 years ago. If I had the cash, I'd buy it. It featured some great combat footage, and his narration of his experiences as a combat pilot.

http://pages.prodigy.net/rebeljack/Karl2.JPG
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Dive bombing targets that were heavily defended was a part of our regular assignment as close support fighter pilots. We not only ran the risks involved in flying through heavy flak, or being caught in the explosion of our own bombs, but we also were faced with the problem of bombs not dropping off when we hit the release button. Whenever this happened, we would pull up to a safe altitude, and rock the plane to try to shake off the hung bombs. If this didn't work, we would try another dive with a sharp pullout hoping the force of gravity would do the trick. If none of these options were successful, we had to fly back to our base, and try to land with these lethal weapons still attached to our wings. If they fell off on landing, there was a high likelihood that the bombs would explode, and the odds of the pilot surviving were quite small.

The plane shown above was flown by Lt. Karl Hallberg of my fighter group, the 366th. He had one hung bomb and tried to land at our base at Asch, Belgium, in January 1945. As you can see, the bomb fell off and exploded, but, amazingly, Lt. Hallberg survived. He suffered a head injury, but made a full recovery.

Such were the risks faced by the Thunderbolt pilots, as they went about their job of providing close support for their buddies in the infantry and the tanks. It was a dangerous calling.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
http://pages.prodigy.net/rebeljack/Karl.html

repoman11
09-15-2004, 03:14 PM
I've never seen this site mentioned here before, but I may have just missed it.
http://pages.prodigy.com/fighterpilot/

Many great photos and stories. I saw the video they have for sale on PBS about 9 years ago. If I had the cash, I'd buy it. It featured some great combat footage, and his narration of his experiences as a combat pilot.

http://pages.prodigy.net/rebeljack/Karl2.JPG
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Dive bombing targets that were heavily defended was a part of our regular assignment as close support fighter pilots. We not only ran the risks involved in flying through heavy flak, or being caught in the explosion of our own bombs, but we also were faced with the problem of bombs not dropping off when we hit the release button. Whenever this happened, we would pull up to a safe altitude, and rock the plane to try to shake off the hung bombs. If this didn't work, we would try another dive with a sharp pullout hoping the force of gravity would do the trick. If none of these options were successful, we had to fly back to our base, and try to land with these lethal weapons still attached to our wings. If they fell off on landing, there was a high likelihood that the bombs would explode, and the odds of the pilot surviving were quite small.

The plane shown above was flown by Lt. Karl Hallberg of my fighter group, the 366th. He had one hung bomb and tried to land at our base at Asch, Belgium, in January 1945. As you can see, the bomb fell off and exploded, but, amazingly, Lt. Hallberg survived. He suffered a head injury, but made a full recovery.

Such were the risks faced by the Thunderbolt pilots, as they went about their job of providing close support for their buddies in the infantry and the tanks. It was a dangerous calling.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
http://pages.prodigy.net/rebeljack/Karl.html

Tooz_69GIAP
09-15-2004, 04:33 PM
Wow!! The pilot survived!!! Damn, that's on'e lucky SoB!!!

whit ye looking at, ya big jessie?!?!

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LEXX_Luthor
09-15-2004, 06:41 PM
Only in a P~47 http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

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karost
09-15-2004, 09:38 PM
Thanks ,repoman11 for your post and amazing picture.

first time when see your picture( with out read ) I think that p-47 was hit by mk-108 seem like I saw in this game ( sorry just little funny http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif )

but after read in details, wow man... Lt. Karl Hallberg was a good lucky man in wwii , his job was very risk.

EDIT:
I learn somthing form you post ,that time Lt. Karl Hallberg knowed his bomb still there and he tried to make a soft landing as most as he can but not enought the bomb fell off and exploded , that reflex me about for landing p-47 has a alot G impack on the ground when landing.

landing a real p-47 is not easy like in game


S!

[This message was edited by karost on Wed September 15 2004 at 08:51 PM.]

repoman11
09-15-2004, 10:04 PM
No doubt, landing was much harder. But who knew that bailing out was too?
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>On August 8, 1944, I was flying at 13,000 feet on a mission near Paris, when I was hit by 88mm flak. Oil covered my canopy, and it was apparent I was going down. Doing things exactly as I had planned, I trimmed the plane to roll left, then dived head first out the right side. The next thing I knew, I was trapped in a vacuum under the belly of the plane which was apparently created by the prop wash and air coming over the top of the wing. Oil was all over me and the plane, and I had to get my hands and knees against the belly of the plane and push myself off. I landed on a small haystack, and within a short period of time I was picked up by the Germans. Unfortunately, they were members of the SS, and instead of being sent to a POW camp, I was sent to the concentration camp at Buchenwald.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://pages.prodigy.net/rebeljack/Herbie-and-others.html

It was certainly not fun and games for them, not by a long shot. We should all count our blessings.

repoman11
09-16-2004, 02:33 AM
More history, found following the links from the first site.
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>In 1942 my father, George Rarey, a young cartoonist and commercial artist, was drafted into the Army Air Corps. He flew a P-47 before he drove a car. During his service he kept a cartoon journal of the daily life of the fighter pilots. A few weeks after D-Day he was killed in combat over France.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
http://www.rareybird.com/ham.gif
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Andy Anderson: April 29, 1944.
Capt. Thurmond Morrison, roaring down the metal-plank runway, never got off the ground. At the end of the runway was a gasoline dump (a fine place for it, right?) and Capt. Morrison smashed right into it. A tremendous explosion resulted and those of us on "sweater's hill" wrote him off as one dead fighter pilot. To our utter amazement, he walked back into the operations tent a little later, carrying his parachute and totally unscathed. Two anti-aircraft GIs had run to Capt. Morrison's aid and, using a pickax, pried open his canopy and dragged him out of the burning plane. Capt. Morrison, plane and all, had skidded right through the blazing inferno he had started, but he sat there trapped in his plane until the two GIs pried him out. You have to give credit to a couple of heroes there, to leap on a burning plane carrying a very volatile load of high octane gasoline.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

More of the same, http://www.rareybird.com/

p1ngu666
09-16-2004, 02:53 AM
great thread http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/11.gif http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

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repoman11
09-16-2004, 02:37 PM
Ok, one last teaser/bump (I really think more people would like to read this than have so far viewed this thread).

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>By this time I was probably at 2,500 to 3,000 feet altitude, when all hell broke loose! I was hit by either a 40 millimeter or 88 millimeter shell. Whatever it was, it came up through the gas tank, blew my left arm off just below the elbow, completely severing it -- I looked down and saw it lying on the floor of the cockpit. The cockpit was full of fire, and the control stick was limp in my hand. I had no control of the plane, so I knew it was time to try to bail out. I used to think about bailing out while in pilot training as a cadet, and on previous combat missions. I wondered if I would be scared or would have the courage to bail out. Well, being afraid or lacking courage never crossed my mind when I got hit. I knew I had to get out of that plane, and quite obviously I did.

The only thing about it was that apparently I was unconscious or in a sub-conscious state, and don't remember doing all of the things necessary to get out of the cockpit and away from the plane. I do remember reaching up to unlatch the canopy, and pulling it back. I do not remember unfastening the safety belt, leaving the plane or pulling the rip-cord to open my chute. I do remember one hell of a roar from the plane's engine (I can still hear that roar), as if it were in a steep power dive. I vividly recall saying to myself "Well, Bork, this is it," meaning that I would be dead in a moment or two from the crash. At the moment I thought that I was still in the plane. Then at about the same time, or so it seemed, I heard a loud pop. I was regaining consciousness, and looking up I saw that the chute was open, and I was as free as a bird floating down in the breeze -- with a tight grip on my upper left arm like a tourniquet to keep from bleeding to death.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://pages.prodigy.net/rebeljack/Bork.html

F19_Ob
09-17-2004, 06:15 AM
interesting story.....wonder how often bombs stuck like that?

repoman11
01-29-2005, 01:08 PM
Bump for the greatest P-47 photo ever.