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View Full Version : Why Assassin's Creed must return to its roots.



Kirkool
01-02-2015, 08:13 AM
Spoilers ahead for anybody who hasn't played the games through to the completion of their storylines. Also, I hope Ubisoft gives this a glance over, as I'm sure everybody who posts on here does. Please excuse any spelling or grammar errors in here. I really don't want to proofread this.

As I play the newer Assassin's Creed games (and by newer I mean everything after the story of Ezio), I feel like Altair in the beginning moments of the first game in the franchise -- I am rash, I am an individual rather than an Assassin, and I neither respect nor even really understand the Creed. Let's examine why I perceive these attributes in this way and why it is a problem that I do in the first place.

First we should look at the stories. In AC1, the player understands the significance of the creed in the very first scene. Altair and Malik argue over the importance of the Creed, which Altair actively disregards through actions and words, as he illustrates by responding to criticism of his arrogance with, "My way is better." Altair is clearly superlatively skilled, as Al Mualim himself remarks upon his return to Masyaf, but his refusal to revere the Creed render him a lesser Assassin. The personal journey then becomes one of understanding the Creed, and in doing so, understanding himself and the conflict at large between Templars and Assassins. In the present day, Desmond undergoes a similar journey, as he ran away from The Farm, essentially saying "My way is better" as well. He too begins to understand the significance of the Creed from a philosophical standpoint. As a result, the game becomes something more than a generic revenge, get-the-girl, or stop-the-vaguely-motivated-bad-guys story. Instead, the player understands that the stakes aren't superficial, but rather are connected to the fate of humanity on a spiritual level. Desmond and Altair, and therefore the player, are guided into contemplating the meaning of life and what kind of a world they want to live in (This is the case for reasons I won't describe in much detail, because I am assuming you already know about the dichotomy between the Assassin's and free will vs the Templars and forcible peace). Elio's story arch follows a similar trajectory. The only real difference is that he begins his quest for the sake of revenge and family, but quickly adopts the Assassin's mantle instead of a more personal one.

The key thing to notice here is that the internal conflict that Altair, Desmond, and Ezio experience is directly related to the Assassins vs Templars conflict on a meaningful level. We can't say the same for Edward or Arno. Now let me throw in a disclaimer here: I am a huge fan of Black Flag and Unity. They are fantastic games and I am glad to have played and am still playing both of them. The gameplay (which we will get into later) is tons of fun, and the atmospheres are stellar. That said, the stories are generally bad, especially when compared to the other's I have mentioned, precisely because the protagonists' personal journeys are completely disconnected to the Assassins vs Templars conflict. Edward has opportunity after opportunity to forsake his selfishness and support a meaningful cause, but he never bites. By the end of the story, he just kind of rushes into becoming an Assassin (far too late, mind you), but is still pretty much a novice aside from his ridiculous natural talent. As a result, his joining the Assassins doesn't bear any real weight. There isn't a cathartic moment. It's just exasperating, because he should've joined earlier and then never really grows beyond vaguely realizing, "Hmm, I should live for some reason other than myself." Ubisoft may have been better served by simply making the game they ironically and comically referenced in the Abstergo scenes, focused entirely on swashbuckling pirates who like to fight, drink, and hang out with prostitutes.

Arno's story is probably even more frustrating. His father was an Assassin and he grows up living in the house of the Grand Master of the Templars (for some reason that is never explained. You'd think the Assassins would want to grab one of their own from that guy), but remains astoundingly aloof to the real conflict for almost the entire game. He goes through an incredibly trippy and eye opening experience after drinking from a chalice, undergoes years of training and indoctrination, and still never cares one bit about the actual Assassins vs Templars conflict. He even kills his mentor, who is fighting to salvage some version of the Creed, but never comments, reflects, or grows from the experience. It's just another "kill this guy, move the plot along" kind of activity. On that note, even after constantly being told by his superiors that the Creed is more important than his revenge and being expelled from the Assassins in Paris, the story fails to flesh out any character development. He flat out doesn't care until the cheesy cutscene at the end where he blatantly tells the player what the Creed means, even though he and therefore the player never get to grow to that point. By disconnecting the protagonists personal journey from the Assassin's vs Templars conflict, the games completely lose the essential philosophic elements present in the earlier games. At that point, these games are more like rogue mercenary games than ones that belong in the AC franchise.

Now let's talk about gameplay. First and foremost, synchronization is incredibly important and I hate to see it diminished. Synchronization reminds you that you are running a simulation, sifting through memories. I liked that completing more tasks as Altair gave Desmond more "health" bars, because that mechanic makes perfect sense. The more things Desmond does that Altair did, the more leeway he should have in screwing up at other times. Additionally, the synchronization lends to the general awesomeness of the ancestors. Ever notice that getting hit results in the loss of synch? That's because the ancestor didn't get hit. That's awesome. That means they were never even touched. Arno's health mechanic completely ruins that idea. If Ubisoft wanted to make health potions a thing, then they should have done it in a different way. Instead of finding medicine, maybe you gain synch points for stringing together attacks, completing certain objectives (like Altair's stalking missions, which I will discuss in a moment), or for collecting certain important objects the ancestor would have held (i.e. collectibles) that the player could spend on restoring synchronization. Having health potions in a memory just doesn't make any sense, and it broke my immersion in the game.

I miss having to stalk my targets and learn information about them. Black Flag simply ignores the idea of collecting that kind of information altogether, as Edward is simply told where to go, or completes necessary tailing missions that linearly progress into an assassination. Unity is really lazy, as Arno accepts a mission, pops up on some vantage point, and uses some kind of super-magic eagle vision that detects all possible weaknesses in the location instantly. I mean come on! That's ridiculous. Now I understand that many people found Altair's intel gathering missions a bit tedious, but that doesn't mean you just completely ignore it altogether. At times, Unity felt like I was playing a third person dishonored minus the mind control of rats and stuff. Again, that can be fun, and it is fun, but it isn't Assassin's Creed. I want to stalk my targets. I want to feel like an assassin, not an action hero. So here is a tentative suggestion, which you will notice has similarities to mechanics used in the past: per assassination target, give us, say 4 different intel gathering missions that we can optionally do. Completion of all provides some kind of a special reward (which I think should be synchronization bars). But if you really hate doing that, you can also have the option to simply pay beggars, or bribe guards, or ask bartenders, or whoever else to provide you with some basic information, and then you can go ahead and do the mission. Also, if you collect those 4 requisite pieces of information through these means, you can still receive your synch rewards, so there isn't a max-out-your-character incentive to choose one option over the other. However, taking the easy way out should have some consequences. For instance, maybe the intel isn't correct, and you are forced to adapt in ways you didn't expect. Or maybe somebody you paid off went and tattled, also forcing you to adapt. I like the idea of this system for a couple reasons: 1) if you want to play the full synch assassin type guy, you totally can and will be rewarded for it in a couple ways. Your own reconnaissance can't be faulty, because you performed it yourself, so you never run into anything unexpected, and you get full synchronization rewards. 2) if you want to just go in and tear up the compound guns blazing, then you can go ahead and do it. You don't sacrifice your synch rewards, but do sacrifice stability in your assassination. This way, players get to choose how they play the game. If they want to be sneaky, they can. If they are fatigued by being sneaky, then they aren't forced into doing it like they would have been in AC1. Now both parties get what they want and you don't get any more complaints on that matter.

Also, what happened to the awesome daggers and throwing knives and stuff? I loved playing with Altair's dagger instead of his sword. It just looked cool, even though it was harder. Now you shouldn't necessarily make it harder... maybe give the dagger certain attributes that are better in certain situations than a sword and vice versa. But I, and I think most people, like to have options. Also, it doesn't make any sense why you wouldn't have throwing knives. Maybe don't make them the one hit kills they were in the first game, but it doesn't make sense why an assassin wouldn't have ranged blades like that. (On that note, the phantom blade is just dumb. It's like a really inefficient way of using throwing knives that nobody would ever actually want to use. Just give us berserk knives or something. Limit their capacity so we can't go ham and break the game with them). And on that note, why on earth can't we select the hidden blade as a fighting weapon in Unity? Ugh. Just, ugh. That's a no brainer guys.

Well, sorry this kind of devolved into a rant, but hopefully you all at least see the points I'm trying to make here. And again, I really do enjoy Black Flag and Unity a lot, but I think the franchise is losing focus and needs to get back on track. Maybe Ubisoft doesn't think we really "get" the importance of the Creed, or of gameplay mechanics that make canonical sense. but I promise, we do, and it matters, especially to us fans that have been with the franchise the whole way through. I'd hate to see AC become just another action game.

MasterAssasin84
01-02-2015, 12:07 PM
To be honest I can't really think of Any Assassin that has directly respected the Creed other than Connor ( Thomas Hickey Assassination was a great example of these Ideals )

Black Flag IMO was the most Assassins Creed of all the games since AC1, And from what I remember Ezio was never an Assassin until the very end were he was inducted into the brotherhood.

Black Flag demonstrated the extreme irony of the Assassins Creed and Edward through no fault of his own other than pursuing dreams of wealth and riches exposed these ideals.

Namikaze_17
01-02-2015, 12:31 PM
To be honest I can't really think of Any Assassin that has directly respected the Creed other than Connor ( Thomas Hickey Assassination was a great example of these Ideals )

Black Flag IMO was the most Assassins Creed of all the games since AC1, And from what I remember Ezio was never an Assassin until the very end were he was inducted into the brotherhood.

Black Flag demonstrated the extreme irony of the Assassins Creed and Edward through no fault of his own other than pursuing dreams of wealth and riches exposed these ideals.

This.

m4r-k7
01-02-2015, 12:32 PM
I think in terms of gameplay, Unity definitely returned to the roots of Assassins Creed. Obviousily, it is debatable how well this was achieved, but it was definitely there.

RuNfAtBoYrUn740
01-02-2015, 01:10 PM
Agreed with all your points and loved your suggestion about investigating your target. We need a mechanic like that again. Similar to how in GTAV before a heist you actually have to physically get the getaway vehicle, the costumes, the disguise, inspect the building, look at entrances, alarms etc. In AC we need to plan our entrance, escape, equipment, disguises, motivations, possible loopholes, backup possibilities, picking a potential crew etc. We need some actual build-up to the assassinations. They just feel cheap otherwise. Like ACU assassinations. Half the targets we were killing I had never heard of or knew they existed.

I think in terms of AC, in needs to feel like AC but it needs to innovate. ACU did that to some degree, but it does have some lengths to go. This franchise needs more interactivity with it's storylines, especially since the modern day is pretty much a joke now. The historical plot is more important than ever now.

In all honesty though I'm almost certain they would have thought of many of these ideas, but refused them for whatever reasons (too much money, lack of effort). I think they know of all these cool ideas we give them but just can't be bothered doing them because of said reasons. An annual release schedule doesn't help either.

Megas_Doux
01-02-2015, 03:29 PM
I think in terms of gameplay, Unity definitely returned to the roots of Assassins Creed. Obviousily, it is debatable how well this was achieved, but it was definitely there.

Indeed.

Assassin_M
01-02-2015, 03:33 PM
Ezio had internal conflict?

MasterAssasin84
01-02-2015, 03:56 PM
Ezio had internal conflict?


From what I remember it was a classic tale of vengeance !

Ezio always new what direction he and path he was taking which in contrast is what made Edward so interesting because his path was uncertain and his mind was cleverly uncertain.

Arno is simply running round around like a love sick puppy

Assassin_M
01-02-2015, 04:03 PM
From what I remember it was a classic tale of vengeance !

Ezio always new what direction he and path he was taking which in contrast is what made Edward so interesting because his path was uncertain and his mind was cleverly uncertain.

Arno is simply running round around like a love sick puppy
Yeah, that's what I remember with Ezio too. He never had an internal conflict, everything falls into place for him, everything revolved around him. He never really pondered the Creed, he never thought about the amount of killings he's done, he never thinks "man, this is more crap than I anticipated" no, he just keeps going on and on. List of people? I keel. Ahh I no kill Borgia, I live in peace now. Borgia kill uncle? I keel Borgia. Does he admit that he was wrong for sparing rodrigo? No, he keeps on arguing and arguing like a defensive brat with Machiavelli when everything points to him being wrong. He has no human qualities pre ACB. He's perfect, he's a god, he's rarely angry, he's rarely weak, no he's always strong and never doubts. How is this fun? There's nothing to him, nothing.

MasterAssasin84
01-02-2015, 04:07 PM
Yeah, that's what I remember with Ezio too. He never had an internal conflict, everything falls into place for him, everything revolved around him. He never really pondered the Creed, he never thought about the amount of killings he's done, he never thinks "man, this is more crap than I anticipated" no, he just keeps going on and on. List of people? I keel. Ahh I no kill Borgia, I live in peace now. Borgia kill uncle? I keel Borgia. Does he admit that he was wrong for sparing rodrigo? No, he keeps on arguing and arguing like a defensive brat with Machiavelli when everything points to him being wrong. He has no human qualities pre ACB. He's perfect, he's a god, he's rarely angry, he's rarely weak, no he's always strong and never doubts. How is this fun? There's nothing to him, nothing.

This !!!


Which is why I love the Kenway's ! Murderous, unpredictable and brutally loyal .... Not forgetting Haytham the greatest antagonist I have ever encountered whilst playing AC and for some bizarre reason Shay really makes you enjoy Connor more :) .... Yes I am a Kenway Fan

Shahkulu101
01-02-2015, 04:07 PM
Yeah, that's what I remember with Ezio too. He never had an internal conflict, everything falls into place for him, everything revolved around him. He never really pondered the Creed, he never thought about the amount of killings he's done, he never thinks "man, this is more crap than I anticipated" no, he just keeps going on and on. List of people? I keel. Ahh I no kill Borgia, I live in peace now. Borgia kill uncle? I keel Borgia. Does he admit that he was wrong for sparing rodrigo? No, he keeps on arguing and arguing like a defensive brat with Machiavelli when everything points to him being wrong. He has no human qualities pre ACB. He's perfect, he's a god, he's rarely angry, he's rarely weak, no he's always strong and never doubts. How is this fun? There's nothing to him, nothing.

I do remember him saying that he doesn't find the killing easy, and there's the scene on his birthday when he wonders if all he's done has been pointless. Although yes, I don't remember internal conflict being an integral part of his character.

Assassin_M
01-02-2015, 04:20 PM
I do remember him saying that he doesn't find the killing easy, and there's the scene on his birthday when he wonders if all he's done has been pointless. Although yes, I don't remember internal conflict being an integral part of his character.
Please tell me when he mentions that killing isn't easy. He constantly makes light of killing. "A nice change of page from the usual sneaking and stabbing, I like it" (gosh, ubisoft, you could at least have enough confidence in your players to let them know for themselves that AC II has more variety.....I guess they weren't sure themselves).

That birthday scene was referring to why his family was murdered, not his hunt. He's just wondering why any of that was for (even though Mario friggin told him 10 years ago and you'd think everything he's discovered would help him understand) that scene was nothing but a set up for the "revelation" of the vault. You're expecting me to believe that Ezio is doubting his hunt 10 years later? When he showed no single flicker of doubt before that specific moment? Another instance where the game shoots itself in the foot.

MasterAssasin84
01-02-2015, 04:21 PM
I do remember him saying that he doesn't find the killing easy, and there's the scene on his birthday when he wonders if all he's done has been pointless. Although yes, I don't remember internal conflict being an integral part of his character.

If I remember rightly that was the scene in AC2 when Rosa gave him the shipping manifest as to what vessel is carrying the artefact ? and Ezio goes on to say its his Birthday ?yes i Remember . He actually said 10 years of Killing not knowing what any of it was all for

The Kenway's was the most conflicted family IMO - Haytham has this dream of uniting the Assassins and the templars on a global scale for the Love of his Assassin son ? Connor wanted to end the war amicably and found guilt when he killed and Edward's mind was never in secure place until the very End.

Arno IMO was just in love

Ezio carried out his fathers will as he quite famously quoted to Mario Auditore I will finish fathers work !! " All of it "

Altair put his glory before his duty and pretty much paid the penalty only to uncover that the Assassin mentor was his true enemy ( also learning the importance of three tennents )

The Auditore's was quite straight forward !! Nothing Really there .

Shahkulu101
01-02-2015, 04:27 PM
Please tell me when he mentions that killing isn't easy. He constantly makes light of killing. "A nice change of page from the usual sneaking and stabbing, I like it" (gosh, ubisoft, you could at least have enough confidence in your players to let them know for themselves that AC II has more variety.....I guess they weren't sure themselves).

That birthday scene was referring to why his family was murdered, not his hunt. He's just wondering why any of that was for (even though Mario friggin told him 10 years ago and you'd think everything he's discovered would help him understand) that scene was nothing but a set up for the "revelation" of the vault. You're expecting me to believe that Ezio is doubting his hunt 10 years later? When he showed no single flicker of doubt before that specific moment? Another instance where the game shoots itself in the foot.

I remember him saying something along the lines of "I don't enjoy killing, but it's the only way" in Italian after killing one of his targets. Grimaldi I think it was.

Maybe I'm remembering incorrectly but I'm not even a big Ezio fan, I wouldn't fabricate it just to support him. Like I said, I don't think internal conflict was really a part of Ezio's character, but he had his doubts.

EDIT: Watched a vid and it wasn't Grimaldi, maybe it was with someone else or I wrong but I'm certain he says something at least vaguely similar.

Megas_Doux
01-02-2015, 04:37 PM
Gameplay wise Unity was a return to roots, aka AC I, in some aspects......The story thing, well I do understand that under the current model, they will try to make any assassin different having their own "reasons" and/or motivations and thus provoking different reactions in the fanbase.

Thing is at this rate -annual games- they will run out of stories....

Namikaze_17
01-02-2015, 04:40 PM
they will run out of stories....

Or maybe they are running out of ways to twist the same story. :rolleyes:

Megas_Doux
01-02-2015, 04:45 PM
Or maybe they are running out of ways to twist the same story. :rolleyes:

That is true....

Assassin_M
01-02-2015, 06:35 PM
I remember him saying something along the lines of "I don't enjoy killing, but it's the only way" in Italian after killing one of his targets. Grimaldi I think it was.

Maybe I'm remembering incorrectly but I'm not even a big Ezio fan, I wouldn't fabricate it just to support him. Like I said, I don't think internal conflict was really a part of Ezio's character, but he had his doubts.

EDIT: Watched a vid and it wasn't Grimaldi, maybe it was with someone else or I wrong but I'm certain he says something at least vaguely similar.
mate, i know you're not fabricating, it's just such a little piece of Ezio's character (relegated to DLC, mind you, yes the part where he says he dislikes killing is after killing one of Savonarola's men, geez. No idea how people are saying that Ubisoft is bad right now. God, relegating the most important piece of Ezio's development to DLC)

EmbodyingSeven5
01-02-2015, 07:58 PM
Yeah, that's what I remember with Ezio too. He never had an internal conflict, everything falls into place for him, everything revolved around him. He never really pondered the Creed, he never thought about the amount of killings he's done, he never thinks "man, this is more crap than I anticipated" no, he just keeps going on and on. List of people? I keel. Ahh I no kill Borgia, I live in peace now. Borgia kill uncle? I keel Borgia. Does he admit that he was wrong for sparing rodrigo? No, he keeps on arguing and arguing like a defensive brat with Machiavelli when everything points to him being wrong. He has no human qualities pre ACB. He's perfect, he's a god, he's rarely angry, he's rarely weak, no he's always strong and never doubts. How is this fun? There's nothing to him, nothing.
strange as it sounds....... this is why I like ezio...........

Assassin_M
01-02-2015, 08:07 PM
strange as it sounds....... this is why I like ezio...........
Not strange at all, it makes sense. A character like Ezio would not be as popular in a different medium. He's the Goku, the John Cena. Those people are less popular than Vegeta and CM Punk respectively. However, the earlier two are both VERY popular with the casual crowd. You wanna know why this is the case? Because John Cena and Goku are not fantasies. You don't "become" John Cena and Goku. You only watch them and when--IF--you play as them in their respective video games, it's only because they're super strong and you want to win but you still prefer Vegeta and CM Punk because they're ACTUALLY interesting characters who develop and change over time.

If Ezio was on a TV show, or something that's not interactive, he'd be far, far, far less popular then he is now.

JonoLee
01-03-2015, 01:23 PM
Mechanically, AC: Unity tried its hardest to return to AC's roots.

Story wise? Not even close? Tried way too hard to be Assassin's Creed 2 2.0 and failed in every aspect. Basically ignored the French Revolution entirely in favor of Ezio's vengeance story 2.0. I think it was cute how this was the best that Ubisoft could do after supposedly four years of developement. Which leads me to two conclusions:

Either,

A) Ubisoft's writers are lazy/incompetent and need to be replaced

or

B) AC: Unity was (undoubtedly) rushed and was in no way under development for four years

Namikaze_17
01-03-2015, 01:48 PM
A character like Ezio would not be as popular in a different medium. He's the John Cena.

http://k43.kn3.net/taringa/4/7/9/7/0/0/7/chaderi/45C.gif?864

EmptyCrustacean
01-03-2015, 05:08 PM
To be honest I can't really think of Any Assassin that has directly respected the Creed other than Connor ( Thomas Hickey Assassination was a great example of these Ideals )

Connor was never loyal to the Brotherhood itself, only his own principals which coincidentally just so happened to mirror that of the Creed. In order to be a true Assassin one needs to be humble and listen to their mentors. Connor had a problem with authority in general and such why he was too proud to even do the traditional induction ceremony. He thought it was beneath him. I also don't like the fact that Juno AKA the main villain of this entire story basically used his own fears to manipulate him into joining the Brotherhood. I felt like ACIII did a better job with showing us what it meant to be a Templar than what it meant to be an Assassin which is why Haytham is a better character.

As for the OP, great post. Especially the part about how the conflict of the Assassins and Templars should be the driving force for the main character at some point in the story, not a mere backdrop like it was in Black Flag - and I love Black Flag! We see Ezio's progression throughout AC2 and it's reinforced when he expresses in the final boss battle: "I thought I was beyond this but I'm not". And then, of course, he spares Rodrigo in the end proving that he had learned. The devs incorporated his growth into the gameplay itself, not tacked it on at the end. The most important thing Ezio and Altair had in common was that we got to see their personal wants and needs evolve into what it means to be a true Assassin. We never got to see that with any of the other characters. In Unity it's made worse because for the first time we don't even get to see what would motivate somebody to become a Templar. The death speeches in previous games gave us insight into a Templar's reasoning. In Unity all we see is flashbacks of what people do, not why they do it.

I do hope, OP, you read my blog post on the downward turn the story of AC has taken: https://cartoonsarebetterthanreallife.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/nothing-is-true-assassins-creed-coming-2015/ It's lengthy but I think you'll find a lot to agree with.

Assassin_M
01-03-2015, 05:17 PM
Connor was never loyal to the Brotherhood itself, only his own principals which coincidentally just so happened to mirror that of the Creed. In order to be a true Assassin one needs to be humble and listen to their mentors. Connor had a problem with authority in general and such why he was too proud to even do the traditional induction ceremony. He thought it was beneath him. I also don't like the fact that Juno AKA the main villain of this entire story basically used his own fears to manipulate him into joining the Brotherhood. I felt like ACIII did a better job with showing us what it meant to be a Templar than what it meant to be an Assassin which is why Haytham is a better character.
Oh yes he was, mate. Here let me show you examples:
1- He didn't kill GW, who killed his mother and was threatening his people, because he knew that would mean the Templars would gain control over the patriots if he does.
2- He helps GW with Benidict Arnold even though it's of no gain for his people but because he cannot let the Patriots' fight for freedom die. He did it because his ideals as an Assassin for freedom and liberty is extended to all, including the colonists.
3- He continues serving the brotherhood loyally even after his people leave their lands. He continues until at least 1804. That's a long time of service for someone who was "never loyal to the brotherhood itself"

And wow about that whole principles comment. OBVIOUSLY you'd be attracted to people who share your principles. It's not a coincidence. It's why he joins the Assassins in the first place.

Connor also never once disobeyed Achilles. He argued and fought but NEVER disobeyed him. He always did what he told him to do. And besides, no. being a true Assassin does not mean listening to your mentor unequivocally. That's dumb.Heck, Altair himself questioned his mentor.

Where the heck are you getting that stuff about the ceremony being beneath him? Lol, did you even pay attention to the game? Achilles just assumes that neither of them were the type for ceremonies which I think he was wrong. That look Connor gives him after that comment makes me think that. Please know what you're talking about before replying.

Haytham is not a better character, no. (I'm assuming it's all subjective)

You know? I always hated when Connor fans said that people just don't understand him....I hated that comment. I'm starting to change my mind.

EmptyCrustacean
01-03-2015, 05:19 PM
Mechanically, AC: Unity tried its hardest to return to AC's roots. Story wise? Not even close? Tried way too hard to be Assassin's Creed 2 2.0 and failed in every aspect. Basically ignored the French Revolution entirely in favor of Ezio's vengeance story 2.0. I think it was cute how this was the best that Ubisoft could do after supposedly four years of developement. Which leads me to two conclusions:

I think they realised their mistake with ACIII was going too far in the direction of historical events to the point where it become an American Revolution game rather than an AC one. It made it rigid and dull. With Unity they go the complete opposite and ignore the historical setting to the point where it renders it kind of pointless. Important historical characters become mere cameos so you never form an attachment to them. None of what is going on politically really factors in the game play as promised.

AC2 and Brotherhood did a wonderful job of merging history with Ezio's personal story. One was never sacrificed for the other.
Leonardo DaVinci's inventions, for instance, and just the character himself. The whole Borgia family - great villains. I feel like Ubisoft know what people liked about ACII but don't understand why.

Namikaze_17
01-03-2015, 06:00 PM
Because I'm bored...



Connor was never loyal to the Brotherhood itself,

Right... and him reviving it and making it better than ever meant nothing? :rolleyes:

Not to mention he's a living legend among the Brotherhood in France and Eseosa from the Haitian Brotherhood.


only his own principals which coincidentally just so happened to mirror that of the Creed.

Of course, they wrote him that way. :p



In order to be a true Assassin one needs to be humble and listen to their mentors. Connor had a problem with authority in general and such why he was too proud to even do the traditional induction ceremony.

Connor was the most humble; he only argued with Achilles a few times, but never disobeyed.

And It was Achilles who suggested not to do the ceremony.

"There used to be a ceremony on such occasions, but either of us are really the type for that."


He thought it was beneath him..

You have proof of him saying or showing this? :rolleyes:


I also don't like the fact that Juno AKA the main villain of this entire story basically used his own fears to manipulate him into joining the Brotherhood.

Every Assassin was used when you think about it, another point of yours I don't understand. :-\


I felt like ACIII did a better job with showing us what it meant to be a Templar than what it meant to be an Assassin which is why.

Yes! They were finally humanizing the Templars! :cool:



Haytham is a better character.

Subjective, mate. :rolleyes:


We see Ezio's progression throughout AC2 and it's reinforced when he expresses in the final boss battle: "I thought I was beyond this but I'm not". And then, of course, he spares Rodrigo in the end proving that he had learned.

Learned what? That revenge was the answer?

If Rodrigo didn't have the Staff, Ezio would've killed him thus making his "development" more pointless.

What's worse is that he's suddenly "done" and doesn't wanna kill anymore when his blade was inches from Rodrigo minutes ago.

IT MADE NO SENSE.


The most important thing Ezio and Altair had in common was that we got to see their personal wants and needs evolve into what it means to be a true Assassin.

Alta´r did.

It took Ezio to be an old man in his THIRD game to learn what the others did/learned in one. :rolleyes:



In Unity it's made worse because for the first time we don't even get to see what would motivate somebody to become a Templar. The death speeches in previous games gave us insight into a Templar's reasoning. In Unity all we see is flashbacks of what people do, not why they do it.

This, we can agree on. :)