PDA

View Full Version : OT WWII Pilot questions



slambog
07-14-2004, 09:20 PM
1) Were the cockpits of fighters pressurized?

2) If there were not and these guys were in a dog fight lets say that may of started at around 20,000 ft and made rapid decents to lets say 5,000 did there ear drums pop or burst?

slambog
07-14-2004, 09:20 PM
1) Were the cockpits of fighters pressurized?

2) If there were not and these guys were in a dog fight lets say that may of started at around 20,000 ft and made rapid decents to lets say 5,000 did there ear drums pop or burst?

Waldo.Pepper
07-14-2004, 09:22 PM
1 No, hence the oxygen masks in the old movies.

2. Yes, they're human not gods.

wayno7777
07-14-2004, 09:28 PM
Odd number BF-109's were supposed to be pressurized. ie.G-3,5,7,9,11,13. HE-219's were. Some TA-152's were supposed to be. IIRC They had many problems with the rubber seals.

http://img74.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/FB%20shots/Aircraft/heinkel_219.jpg
Any landing you can walk away from is a good one!

MEGILE
07-14-2004, 09:28 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>1 No, hence the oxygen masks in the old movies.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

umm dont fighter pilots today where Oxygen masks.. id think that those cockpits were pressurized..but i dunno
I think its navy regulation that aviatiors whear the mask on takeoff today http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

http://www.5thairforce.com/e107_files/public/p51lightj.jpg

Countdown to 1337 post count = P minus 174

wayno7777
07-14-2004, 09:30 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by MEGILE:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>1 No, hence the oxygen masks in the old movies.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

umm dont fighter pilots today where Oxygen masks.. id think that those cockpits were pressurized..but i dunno
I think its navy regulation that aviatiors whear the mask on takeoff http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

http://www.5thairforce.com/e107_files/public/p51lightj.jpg

Countdown to _1337_ post count = P minus 174<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


I think O2 is required on any flight over ten-thousand feet. 3000 meters.

http://img74.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/FB%20shots/Aircraft/heinkel_219.jpg
Any landing you can walk away from is a good one!

ELEM
07-15-2004, 02:28 AM
Very few a/c during WWII were pressurised. Just a few experimental high altitude types, which is why oxygen masks should be used over 10,000ft. Pressurisation adds a great deal of weight and complexity to an a/c and the early systems were very unreliable.

Sudden changes of altitude will of course have an effect on your ears, but unless you have serious blockages of the sinus' or eustacian tubes it will clear easily by swallowing. This is something you learn to deal with when you fly (or dive).

I wouldn't join any club that would have ME as member!

http://img35.photobucket.com/albums/v107/Elem_Klimov/I-16_desktop.jpg http://img35.photobucket.com/albums/v107/Elem_Klimov/dhm_787_small.jpg

BennyMoore
07-15-2004, 02:34 AM
That, along with problems with money, is the very reason I had to stop flying. I have both blocked sinuses and blocked eustacian tubes. Last time I came in for a landing, my ears were bleeding (although I did not know it until my next doctor checkup). Yay for me!

ELEM
07-15-2004, 02:57 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by BennyMoore:
That, along with problems with money, is the very reason I had to stop flying. I have both blocked sinuses and blocked eustacian tubes. Last time I came in for a landing, my ears were bleeding (although I did not know it until my next doctor checkup). Yay for me!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sorry to hear that Benny. Can it not be cured in your case?

I wouldn't join any club that would have ME as member!

http://img35.photobucket.com/albums/v107/Elem_Klimov/I-16_desktop.jpg http://img35.photobucket.com/albums/v107/Elem_Klimov/dhm_787_small.jpg

ploughman
07-15-2004, 03:14 AM
Some fella posted a picture of the inside of a pressurised Spit cockpit from where he works (good job there dude). It had to do with the way the Spit 9's cockpit looks like the inside of Darth Vader's jock-strap with enormous great bolts everywhere. So there you go, a pressurised Spitfire. If you want to trawl through the last four months of posts, I'm sure you'll find it.

ELEM
07-15-2004, 03:35 AM
Yes there were pressurised variants of the Spitfire. This site lists them...

http://www.supermarine-spitfire.co.uk/spitfire_variants.html

I did say "few" not "none".

I wouldn't join any club that would have ME as member!

http://img35.photobucket.com/albums/v107/Elem_Klimov/I-16_desktop.jpg http://img35.photobucket.com/albums/v107/Elem_Klimov/dhm_787_small.jpg

Zyzbot
07-15-2004, 07:38 AM
The B-29 bomber had pressurized crew compartments.

PBNA-Boosher
07-15-2004, 07:41 AM
The problem with pressurization is that once a hole is ripped into the aircraft that is pressurized, you lose complete control of the plane until the pressure becomes even. This can be fatal if you get hit at low altitude.

Boosher
_____________________________
"So do all who live to see such times, but that is not for them to decide. All you have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to you..."
-Gandalf

Chuck_Older
07-15-2004, 08:21 AM
Also, hypoxia (oxygen deprivation) was a common killer. Fighter pilots were trained to recognise their personal warning signs of hypoxia, because it is not an obvious thing. Shortness of breath, warm sensation, fingertips and nails turning blue, etc. US pilots and probably all others were actually exposed to simulated high altitude conditions- and then were ordered to remove their O2 masks while another cadet monitored them in the simulator.

Many aircraft that just crashed for seemingly no reason were probably victims of the pilot's O2 supply having a problem.

*****************************
The hillsides ring with, "Free the People",
Or can I hear the echoes from the days of '39?
~ Clash

MB_Avro
07-15-2004, 10:00 AM
My father flew Meteors and I asked him about the 'ear-popping' problem when diving from a high altitude.He said that it only became a problem when you reached lower altitudes where the air was denser.

Regards
MB_Avro