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tonywizzz
04-12-2004, 07:38 PM
Lean for high altitudes, but other than that does anyone actually use this and why? with examples pls

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tonywizzz
04-12-2004, 07:38 PM
Lean for high altitudes, but other than that does anyone actually use this and why? with examples pls

http://img26.photobucket.com/albums/v79/Tony_Wizzz/il2/307logo.gif

http://img26.photobucket.com/albums/v79/Tony_Wizzz/il2/RAF%20307%20Squadron%20Wijaszko/

http://www.geocities.com/skrzydla/

JG7_Rall
04-12-2004, 07:57 PM
Just to conserve fuel, but the maps are so small, I doubt anyone uses it. Maybe for those who fly at 10k all the time, but I know I never use it unless the map is huge and the action is far away...

S!

Hutch

"Son, never ask a man if he is a fighter pilot. If he is, he'll let you know. If he isn't, don't embarrass him."
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aerick2
04-12-2004, 08:16 PM
How high is "high"? I normally never touch my mix setting..

No457_Stretch
04-12-2004, 09:09 PM
Fly Russian a/c and you'll use it a lot. High alt. for many a/c is 5-6000m or even less.
120% mixture can give you a power boost at low alt, lean out at high alt. to prevent streaming unburnt fuel in you exhaust and allow your motor to run better and give more power. 120, 100, 80% is all I use but do so in every flight.
In most German a/c the automation does the hard work so their flyers won't use it unless they feel like slummin' it with us Ruskies. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Cheers,

Stretch

PlaneEater
04-13-2004, 12:15 AM
It would get more use with longer, high-altitude missions, and if maps were much, much larger.

I'm still waiting for a map big enough to provide for a full 6 or 7 hour bomber escort mission, where I need full fuel on a P-51.

There aren't many of them left. They flew these things. They stepped off the earth, into the sky, in a pair of metal wings and a howling, living, fire-breathing beast of war, and they fought.

And they died.

And the least we can do is remember they were heroes.

michapma
04-13-2004, 03:09 AM
It's about more than just saving fuel. You cannot have optimal engine power if the mixture is not right. I had started writing some stuff about it in my CEM guide, I need to finish it:

http://people.ee.ethz.ch/~chapman/il2guide/cemguide/mixture.htm

In many aircraft--especially German and American aircraft--the mixture is adjusted automatically. As someone mentioned, many Russian-built aircraft require manual mixture controls. My understanding is that you normally you would adjust mixture according to the exhaust gas temperature, but I don't know that we have this in FB. (I can't read Russian and don't have documentation for the VVS aircraft.) However, with increasing altitude, the manifold pressure falls off as the mixture becomes too rich.

I usually start leaning the mixture at around 2500-3000 m. It really becomes significant above 4000 m. In today's light aircraft such as Cessnas, you can already start leaning above 3000', or about 1000 m. How much should you lean? (Leaning the mixture = lower percentage) The higher you go the more you should lean, but be careful not to kill your engine by overleaning. You can use the manifold pressure gauge as an indicator of whether you mixture is good. If a change of the mixture doesn't seem to affect the manifold pressure, then you are probably mixed well enough.

The effect of mixture controls are not modeled all too precisely. Mixture actually has a big impact on the real output power of the engine. If you're interested you can find out more in a linked article on the page above.

http://www.baseclass.modulweb.dk/69giap/fileadmin/Image_Archive/badges/69giap_badge_chap.jpg (http://giap.webhop.info)

The ongoing IL-2 User's Guide (http://people.ee.ethz.ch/~chapman/il2guide/) | Forgotten Skies (http://www.forgottenskies.com/)
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leadbaloon
04-13-2004, 05:09 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by tonywizzz:
Lean for high altitudes, but other than that does anyone actually use this and why? with examples pls

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I was going to post this very same question today, so thanks to Tonywizzz and everybody who's taken the time to answer.

Michampa - Nice site, it's just gone into my favourites.