PDA

View Full Version : Another story from my neighbor, Anna



PBNA-Boosher
04-24-2004, 05:11 PM
As some of you may have not read my previous posts about my neighbor, here's some very important information for you:

Anna is my neighbor. She was a child during World War II and lived right through it... in Warsaw, Poland. She, at the age of twelve, helped hide Jews, cared for her four brothers, and never lost her head. I quote her in saying, "I remember playing in the streets with my brothers as the Germans and Russians exchanged artillery shells over the city." She was a hero in her own right. I'm telling her stories so that you can tell your children, and that they can tell theirs. Like it or not we only have so few years here on earth, and it's important that the lessons of the past are not forgotten. So here is another story.

"The Russians are coming"

In mid-January, 1945, the Russians had invaded Poland and were continuing across the country toward Berlin, liberating towns along the way. Anna and her family had gotten out of Warsaw to avoid the carnage that would take place, but it was inevitable that some of the German troops would hide in the suburbs, waiting for the Russians to come, and then they would fight, and run away again. These "German soldiers" at this point, were barely more than young teenage boys, backed up by retreating SS units and regular Wermacht infantry. The one thing that these teenage boys had on their side was their own courage, and their ignorance. One morning during this cold January of 1945, Anna stepped outside to get some snow to boil in a pot on the stove, as the pipes had frozen. She spotted two teenage boys, rifles out in front of them, bayonets fixed, headed toward her. They weren't walking, but running as fast as they could. Anna quickly ducked back inside her house and locked the front door. The boys, obviously having seen this, rapped at her door. Anna's mother startled awake to this noise, and went to open the door, but Anna stopped her and held her against the wall, farthest from the windows. A gunshot rang outside the door, and the bolt blew open immediately. A heavy leather boot kicked open the door, but that's as far as the boot got. Two shots rang out, this time from farther away. The boot collapsed on the threshold of the door, and the rifle fell inward with a clatter. Anna stayed close to her mother and hugged her tightly, not knowing what was going to happen next. At this moment in time, a young man stepped in the doorway, holding another rifle, but he was taller than the two boys Anna had seen. He looked older two. His rifle had a scope on it. (Anna didn't know it was a scope at the time, but this man was a sniper)
He turned toward them with a smile, and said in broken Polish,
"These two giving you trouble maam?" Anna looked outside at the door, and immediately looked away. The two boys couldn't have been older than 14. They both had gaping holes in the backs of their heads. She didn't speak. She kept hugging her mother.
"Well, if they were, they aren't anymore."
Anna still didn't say anything. This Russian had saved her life, but she could feel nothing but sorrow for the two boys, who got mixed up in something that they shouldn't have in the first place...

PBNA-Boosher
04-24-2004, 05:11 PM
As some of you may have not read my previous posts about my neighbor, here's some very important information for you:

Anna is my neighbor. She was a child during World War II and lived right through it... in Warsaw, Poland. She, at the age of twelve, helped hide Jews, cared for her four brothers, and never lost her head. I quote her in saying, "I remember playing in the streets with my brothers as the Germans and Russians exchanged artillery shells over the city." She was a hero in her own right. I'm telling her stories so that you can tell your children, and that they can tell theirs. Like it or not we only have so few years here on earth, and it's important that the lessons of the past are not forgotten. So here is another story.

"The Russians are coming"

In mid-January, 1945, the Russians had invaded Poland and were continuing across the country toward Berlin, liberating towns along the way. Anna and her family had gotten out of Warsaw to avoid the carnage that would take place, but it was inevitable that some of the German troops would hide in the suburbs, waiting for the Russians to come, and then they would fight, and run away again. These "German soldiers" at this point, were barely more than young teenage boys, backed up by retreating SS units and regular Wermacht infantry. The one thing that these teenage boys had on their side was their own courage, and their ignorance. One morning during this cold January of 1945, Anna stepped outside to get some snow to boil in a pot on the stove, as the pipes had frozen. She spotted two teenage boys, rifles out in front of them, bayonets fixed, headed toward her. They weren't walking, but running as fast as they could. Anna quickly ducked back inside her house and locked the front door. The boys, obviously having seen this, rapped at her door. Anna's mother startled awake to this noise, and went to open the door, but Anna stopped her and held her against the wall, farthest from the windows. A gunshot rang outside the door, and the bolt blew open immediately. A heavy leather boot kicked open the door, but that's as far as the boot got. Two shots rang out, this time from farther away. The boot collapsed on the threshold of the door, and the rifle fell inward with a clatter. Anna stayed close to her mother and hugged her tightly, not knowing what was going to happen next. At this moment in time, a young man stepped in the doorway, holding another rifle, but he was taller than the two boys Anna had seen. He looked older two. His rifle had a scope on it. (Anna didn't know it was a scope at the time, but this man was a sniper)
He turned toward them with a smile, and said in broken Polish,
"These two giving you trouble maam?" Anna looked outside at the door, and immediately looked away. The two boys couldn't have been older than 14. They both had gaping holes in the backs of their heads. She didn't speak. She kept hugging her mother.
"Well, if they were, they aren't anymore."
Anna still didn't say anything. This Russian had saved her life, but she could feel nothing but sorrow for the two boys, who got mixed up in something that they shouldn't have in the first place...

-HH-Dubbo
04-24-2004, 05:15 PM
Sobering.
Thanks for the post Boosher.

http://www.angelfire.com/falcon/nightschpanker/crashoz.jpg
Kermit the Frog is actually a south paw.

PBNA-Boosher
04-24-2004, 10:22 PM
Glad you liked it, here's a hearty bump!

WUAF_Co_Hero
04-24-2004, 10:44 PM
Good story Boosher!! Ty.

Build a man a fire, keep him warm for a day...

Set a man on fire, keep him warm for the rest of his life.

Whatsmypassword
04-24-2004, 11:44 PM
Was it Vasili Zaitsev?

FROM THE POSTWAR MEMOIRS OF VASILI ZAITSEV

Every sniper put forward his speculations and guesses arising from his days observation of the enemy forward positions. All sorts of different proposals and baits were discussed. I knew the style of the Nazi snipers by their fire and camouflage and without any difficulty could tell the experienced snipers from the novices, the cowards, from the stubborn, experienced enemies. But the character of the Head of the School was still a mystery to me. He presumably altered his position frequently and was looking as carefully for me as I was for him.Then something happened: my friend Morozov was killed and Sheykin wounded - by a rifle with telescopic sights. Morozov and Sheykin were considered experienced snipers; they often emerged victorious from the most difficult skirmishes with the enemy. Now there was no doubt. They had come up against the Nazi super-sniper I was looking for.For a long time I examined the enemy positions, but could not detect his hiding-place. From the speed with which he had fired, I came to the conclusion that the sniper was somewhere directly ahead of us. I continued to watch. To the left was a tank, out of action, and on the right was a pillbox. Between the tank and the pillbox, on a stretch of level ground, lay a sheet of iron and a small pile of broken bricks. It had been lying there a long time, and we had grown accustomed to it being there. I put myself in the enemys position and thought - where better for a sniper? One had only to make a firing slit under the sheet of metal, and then creep up to it during the night.Yes, he was certainly there, under the sheet of metal in no mans land. I thought I would make sure. I put a mitten on the end of a small plank and raised it. The Nazi fell for it. I carefully let the plank down in the same position as I had raised it and examined the bullet-hole. It had gone straight though from the front; that meant that the Nazi was under the sheet of metal.Now came the question of luring even a part of his head into my sights. I was useless trying to do this straight away. Time was needed, but I had been able to study the Germans temperament. He was not going to leave the successful position he had found. We were therefore going to have to change our position.We worked by night and were in position by dawn. The sun rose. Kulikov took a blind shot; we had to rouse the snipers curiosity. We had decided to spend the morning waiting, as we might have been given away by the sun on our telescopic sights. After lunch our rifles were in the shade, and the sun was shining directly on the Germans position, at the edge of the sheet of metal something was glittering: an odd bit of glass or telescopic sights? Kulikov carefully - as only the most experienced can do - began to raise his helmet. The German fired. For a fraction of a second Kulikov rose and screamed. The German believed that he had finally got the Soviet sniper he had been hunting for four days, and half raised his head from beneath the sheet of metal. That was what I had been banking on. I took careful aim. The Germans head fell back, and the telescopic sights of his rifle lay motionless, glistening in the sun...

http://www.lawbuzz.com/movies/movieimages/Zaitsev.jpg

[This message was edited by Whatsmypassword on Sat April 24 2004 at 10:52 PM.]

Willthisnamedo
04-25-2004, 01:05 AM
Hmmm:
"Addendum by Martin Pegler
Curator of Weapons, The Royal Armouries, Leeds, UK

Scott,
While researching for a book on sniping, I used some contacts at Russian museums to look into the veracity of the much reported fight between Zeitsev and Koenig [Thorvald]. Despite the fact that Russian company and regimental records were faithfully kept even throughout the worst days of the Stalingrad seige, nowhere is this duel reported in war diaries. This would seem to be an odd omission, particularly in the face of the cult of 'Sniperism' that the Soviet press were so keen to extoll.

I tend to agree with Anthony Beevor's opinion that the shooting match never actually happened and was the result of propoganda reporting by the press who were always keen to promote new 'Heroes of the Soviet Union'."

LEXX_Luthor
04-25-2004, 01:33 AM
Yes, I heard of that possibility of the sniper duel never happening. Maybe it was in the book I am reading. Beevor, did he write the 1998 Stalingrad book? I have been reading that book down at the bookstore recently.

Not sure yet if I am going to buy it. I dunno. He has a whole chapter on the "Air Bridge" into Stalingrad, with great coverage of the tragedy inside during the airlift, very little coverage of the airlift itself, the aircraft, pilots, ground crew, etc... Damn, he could make that book a thousand pages. If I were writing the book I would include a map with all the airfields within 200km that both Russian and German air forces used--well, if that information is still possible to get.

I have not seen this yet in the book, but I have heard of one important airfield used during the airlift that was crowded with transports when T~34s appeared at the edge of the airfield. Some planes crashed in the snow and ice or something trying to take off. hmmmm.

I am also considering buying something called...Fire In The Sky may be the name. A 500 page book about South Pacific air war. Possible, as my book buying is very limited now.



__________________
http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/10.gif Flyable Swedish "Gladiator" listed as J8A ...in Aces Expansion Pack


"You will still have FB , you will lose nothing" ~WUAF_Badsight
"I had actually pre ordered CFS3 and I couldnt wait..." ~Bearcat99
"Gladiator and Falco, elegant weapons of a more civilized age" ~ElAurens
:
"Damn.....Where you did read about Spitfire made from a wood?
Close this book forever and don't open anymore!" ~Oleg_Maddox http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

AirBot
04-25-2004, 01:55 AM
Thanks for the story Boosher. And thank Anna for us as well.

Luthor, Fire in the Sky is a good book, although it's more like 700 pages long http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

LEXX_Luthor
04-25-2004, 02:48 AM
700 pages wow! I was walking to the pay counter and real quick flipped to what I thought was near the back to see how many pages I was about to buy and I guess I was too fast. Actually I was going to buy it today but forgot I didn't have the money so, maybe another day. Anyway its a softback so I can afford it.

I wonder if that Chris Bergstrom book or books about Easter Front air war will ever be in soft back too.

__________________
http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/10.gif Flyable Swedish "Gladiator" listed as J8A ...in Aces Expansion Pack


"You will still have FB , you will lose nothing" ~WUAF_Badsight
"I had actually pre ordered CFS3 and I couldnt wait..." ~Bearcat99
"Gladiator and Falco, elegant weapons of a more civilized age" ~ElAurens
:
"Damn.....Where you did read about Spitfire made from a wood?
Close this book forever and don't open anymore!" ~Oleg_Maddox http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Aaron_GT
04-25-2004, 03:18 AM
Thank Anna for me on behalf of my wife too. My
wife's family on her mother's side are Polish,
originally of Jewish extraction, from Poland.
Quite a number didn't make it through WW2.

Nowak1234
04-25-2004, 07:50 AM
Boosher please dont speak for the polish nation here, i live in Germany and i was born in Poland, i make my scool here in Germany and i have many good german friends here this are normaly peaple, my opinion obout the Germans is good, for me is the wwII over and we live in year 2004 !! not in 1939 !!, that what the Germans have do in wwII was wrong but i think the Germans learned and are now democratical peaple and i am happy to live in Germany. So please stop speaking here for the polish nation did you understand? http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

tsisqua
04-25-2004, 08:03 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Nowak1234:
Boosher please dont speak for the polish nation here, i live in Germany and i was born in Poland, i make my scool here in Germany and i have many good german friends here this are normaly peaple, my opinion obout the Germans is good, for me is the wwII over and we live in year 2004 !! not in 1939 !!, that what the Germans have do in wwII was wrong but i think the Germans learned and are now democratical peaple and i am happy to live in Germany. So please stop speaking here for the polish nation did you understand? http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Nowak, I didn't see anything bad about the modern German people here, or about the two young men that had to be soldiers when they they should have been playing ball, only sympathy for them, after they had been shot.

"Those that forget the lessons of history are doomed to repeat its mistakes . . . " or something like that.

Tsisqua

p1ngu666
04-25-2004, 08:45 AM
sad story :\

http://www.pingu666.modded.me.uk/mysig3.jpg
&lt;123_GWood_JG123&gt; NO SPAM!

PBNA-Boosher
04-25-2004, 09:19 AM
I'm sorry Nowak1234, but it seems that you are the one that is misunderstanding in this situation. This is in no way a comment on society. I am not making these stories up. They are real experiences lived by a real person. I am just telling them the way they are told to me. I am not speaking on behalf of anyone except Anna. When she said, they shouldn't have been there in the first place, she meant it. What is a 14 year old boy doing in war? It was in no way a comment on modern Germany. I happen to know and have befriended quite a few Germans of modern time face to face. I'm very good friends with the German exchange student in my school. I consider people as people first before their nationalities, unless they judge me first by mine. Now I don't want a threat, and you don't want any of mine, so let's just read the stories, learn the lessons, and move on.

Nowak1234
04-25-2004, 09:33 AM
Ok i did misunderstand you sorry, its somethimes difficult to understand a language, no problem.
Its historical correct. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

tsisqua
04-25-2004, 11:36 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Nowak1234:
Ok i did misunderstand you sorry, its somethimes difficult to understand a language, no problem.
Its historical correct. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Good for you, Nowak. I suspected there was a language problem. Welcome to the forum. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Tsisqua

PBNA-Boosher
04-25-2004, 11:58 AM
I accept your apology and I hope you accept mine, as I reread my post and seem to have been a tiny bit harsh. I'm glad we are now in agreement.

Pimpo
04-25-2004, 12:33 PM
nowak is right though http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

überzeugte luftwaffle