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Moodyblues57
04-25-2014, 02:34 PM
I am at the point where I can play along with Kiss' Detroit Rock City without the Rocksmith crutch. Unfortunately, there appears to be a couple of missing passages; I'm not sure of the terminology, but they are definitely too short to be called a riff.

Anyway, one part occurs at the 3:01 point in the Destroyer version of the song (in which the song doesn't even really start until 1:27). It appears to be just a 6-note passage, wherein the guitar and bass play the same thing. I know I should be able to figure this out myself, but can anyone help me with what is played there? There is another missing passage at 4:55, but that seems to be the same as the final one, which Rocksmith does have transcribed.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Lawrencein91
04-25-2014, 04:32 PM
I can't look it up at the moment but have you tried playing the song on Rhythm to see if any of the missing parts are in there.

Moodyblues57
04-25-2014, 05:24 PM
I can't look it up at the moment but have you tried playing the song on Rhythm to see if any of the missing parts are in there.
Thanks, Lawrence; I haven't tried that. I'll take a look this evening.

Greenbrick2
04-25-2014, 06:41 PM
Is that the same version used in Rocksmith? I know there are versions that have a bass fill that isn't used in the one we got.

Moodyblues57
04-25-2014, 09:01 PM
That was a great catch, Greenbrick! Turns out there is another slightly different version than the one on Destroyer. The version from Double Platinum seems to be the one we have on Rocksmith. Thanks!

Gold_Jim
04-25-2014, 09:18 PM
That was a problem with several songs that we would cover in bands. One person would learn the album version, another a remix, someone else a live song, and the other person would know the single. Detroit Rock City was one of those songs. What you get in RS is the 'single' version and if you think it's confusing on guitar, think about the whole band. The drums play the song straight on the single, but they have the stop and paradiddle in the album version. Then there's the Kiss Alive II version, where the drums are slightly different than the album and obviously the mix is obviously much different. That's why when we go to cover songs, we usually share the version we're doing to make sure we're all on the same page. Of course, RS could probably do what Guitar World does and have a "As heard on <insert album or single name here>" notation.

Moodyblues57
04-25-2014, 10:35 PM
PRS, I envy you for being good enough to play in a band! And my little bit of frustration doesn't come close to comparing with yours! I don't mean to beat up RS about this, it was just a bit embarrassing when I told my family that I finally learned a song well enough to play along with the CD; when the slight change snuck up on me, I got so flustered that I might as well have been playing guitar with my feet! And, the album cover shown for the song *is* Destroyer. Just sayin'...:p

Gold_Jim
04-28-2014, 04:30 PM
PRS, I envy you for being good enough to play in a band! And my little bit of frustration doesn't come close to comparing with yours! I don't mean to beat up RS about this, it was just a bit embarrassing when I told my family that I finally learned a song well enough to play along with the CD; when the slight change snuck up on me, I got so flustered that I might as well have been playing guitar with my feet! And, the album cover shown for the song *is* Destroyer. Just sayin'...:p

Agh, any jerk (even me) who can play three chords joins a band at some point. :D

I prefer the little riff to which you refer in your post to the single version of this song. To me, this showcased how tightly Kiss could play as well as how intricate Criss played his drums. For marketing reasons, Kiss wanted to keep things kiss (keep it simple, stupid), so many times their songs were 'dumbed down'. In every band I was in, we played the Kiss Alive II version of Detroit Rock City, and we always made sure that part was included. I'll never forget the days my cousin and I spent perfecting our rendition of 100,000 Years. He played the drum solo to a T every time. I played Ace's part and sang, and we would practice in a White Stripes - esque no bass, one guitar style until we had every song we wanted down tight before inviting others to join in. Man, those were the days!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_a-NYivv6o

Moodyblues57
04-28-2014, 06:02 PM
I was fairly big Kiss fan back in the day--saw them twice at Indiana State University, c. 1977-1978, I "knew a guy", so we were in the 3rd row on Gene Simmons' side both times, far enough back to not get hit with flying blood, sweat and spit. Very impressed that you play the Frehley part! Man, thanks for taking me back with that video, it brings back a lot of great memories, it's almost as if I'm 20 years old, back at the Hulman Center again...

...is that burning rope I smell?

Gold_Jim
04-28-2014, 06:19 PM
I was fairly big Kiss fan back in the day--saw them twice at Indiana State University, c. 1977-1978, I "knew a guy", so we were in the 3rd row on Gene Simmons' side both times, far enough back to not get hit with flying blood, sweat and spit. Very impressed that you play the Frehley part! Man, thanks for taking me back with that video, it brings back a lot of great memories, it's almost as if I'm 20 years old, back at the Hulman Center again...

...is that burning rope I smell?

Back then, having a friend at the local rock station was all you needed to get good seats. OK, it didn't hurt if you had a way to hook him up with something he wanted. :D That's how I got all my tickets back then. It was either a DJ or a music industry friend that would get us in. That's how I saw Pink Floyd for The Wall, Delicate Sound of Thunder and Pulse, Judas Priest for British Steel and Screaming for Vengeance, etc. Now, the radio station might get a couple of tickets and they aren't even that great, if they get any at all. The DJ (if there's a human) has a list of songs and exactly when to play them. The homogenous play lists are here to stay, unfortunately. What was once a powerful position in the music industry is a puppet on a Clear Channel station.