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MZ6
02-12-2004, 02:24 PM
Jan Zurakowski was Canada's Chuck Yeager, a test pilot known as "the best
of the best" is dead.

But the man who was the first to fly faster than sound in a
Canadian-designed aircraft, the first to fly the Avro Arrow and the first
to take that fabled jet interceptor through the sound barrier, tended to
downplay his achievements.

Asked in 1994 what it was like to achieve such breathtaking and potentially
deadly speeds, he told the Star: "It feels just like flying slowly, only
faster."

Janusz Zurakowski died Monday at home with his family in Barry's Bay, Ont.
He was 89.

Mr. Zurakowski was born of Polish parents in Ryzawka, Russia, Sept. 12,
1914. The family moved to Poland in 1921 after the Bolshevik revolution.
Mr. Zurakowski joined the Polish Air Force in 1934 and learned to fly the
following year. When Germany invaded Poland at the start of World War II,
he fled the country and reached England in January, 1940.

He became a Spitfire pilot in the Royal Air Force and shot down three
German planes during the Battle of Britain. He was shot down in flames once
himself but parachuted to safety. In 1942, he was given command of a Polish
fighter squadron and led dozens of combat missions. He was mentioned twice
in dispatches for his bravery and awarded the Polish Vittuti Miltari and
Cross of Valour.

After the war, Mr. Zurakowski was reunited with his childhood sweetheart
Anna. They married in Paris in 1948.

His career as a test pilot began on the GlosterMeteor, Britain's first
operational jet fighter. It was on the twin-engined Meteor in 1951 that he
perfected the "Zurabatic Cartwheel," an aerobatic manoeuvre that is still a
crowd pleaser at air shows. At the time, though, it had a practical
application. Mr. Zurakowski had been asked to demonstrate what would happen
if an engine failed with the plane in a steep climb under full power.

The year before he had set an air-speed record flying round-trip between
London and Copenhagen.

Mr. Zurakowski immigrated to Canada in 1952 and became Avro Aircraft's
chief development pilot at Malton. Within months, he had power-dived a
CF-100 fighter jet through the sound barrier ? an achievement the plane's
engineers had not thought possible. This was commemorated by the Canadian
Mint in 1996 on a silver $20 coin with a cameo of Mr. Zurakowski.

He also came up with another aerobatic manoeuvre, the "falling leaf,"
putting the plane through a series of graceful sideslips. Again, this had
not been thought possible with a jet.

On March 25, 1958, Mr. Zurakowski piloted the prototype Avro Arrow on its
maiden flight. On its seventh flight, he took the Arrow to 1,600 km/h.

In 1958, he was awarded the McKee Trophy for his achievements in aviation.
The Arrow project was axed the following February and shortly afterward Mr.
Zurakowski retired. During a test flight over the Madawaska Valley
southeast of Algonquin Park, he'd noticed shoreline property near Barry's
Bay that he thought would be a good place to live. The area has many people
of Polish descent, and he and his wife opened Kartuzy Lodge for tourists.
Mr. Zurakowski was inducted into Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame in 1973 and
in 1997 was named a "Pioneer of Canadian Aviation" by the Western Canada
Aviation Museum in Winnipeg. In 2000, the Canadian Flight Test Centre
building in Cold Lake, Alta., was renamed in his honour.

Last summer, Zurakowski Park was opened in Barry's Bay. Mr. Zurakowski is
survived by his wife Anna, and sons George and Mark. A funeral service will
be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at St. Hedwig's Roman Catholic Church in
Barry's Bay

MZ6
02-12-2004, 02:24 PM
Jan Zurakowski was Canada's Chuck Yeager, a test pilot known as "the best
of the best" is dead.

But the man who was the first to fly faster than sound in a
Canadian-designed aircraft, the first to fly the Avro Arrow and the first
to take that fabled jet interceptor through the sound barrier, tended to
downplay his achievements.

Asked in 1994 what it was like to achieve such breathtaking and potentially
deadly speeds, he told the Star: "It feels just like flying slowly, only
faster."

Janusz Zurakowski died Monday at home with his family in Barry's Bay, Ont.
He was 89.

Mr. Zurakowski was born of Polish parents in Ryzawka, Russia, Sept. 12,
1914. The family moved to Poland in 1921 after the Bolshevik revolution.
Mr. Zurakowski joined the Polish Air Force in 1934 and learned to fly the
following year. When Germany invaded Poland at the start of World War II,
he fled the country and reached England in January, 1940.

He became a Spitfire pilot in the Royal Air Force and shot down three
German planes during the Battle of Britain. He was shot down in flames once
himself but parachuted to safety. In 1942, he was given command of a Polish
fighter squadron and led dozens of combat missions. He was mentioned twice
in dispatches for his bravery and awarded the Polish Vittuti Miltari and
Cross of Valour.

After the war, Mr. Zurakowski was reunited with his childhood sweetheart
Anna. They married in Paris in 1948.

His career as a test pilot began on the GlosterMeteor, Britain's first
operational jet fighter. It was on the twin-engined Meteor in 1951 that he
perfected the "Zurabatic Cartwheel," an aerobatic manoeuvre that is still a
crowd pleaser at air shows. At the time, though, it had a practical
application. Mr. Zurakowski had been asked to demonstrate what would happen
if an engine failed with the plane in a steep climb under full power.

The year before he had set an air-speed record flying round-trip between
London and Copenhagen.

Mr. Zurakowski immigrated to Canada in 1952 and became Avro Aircraft's
chief development pilot at Malton. Within months, he had power-dived a
CF-100 fighter jet through the sound barrier ? an achievement the plane's
engineers had not thought possible. This was commemorated by the Canadian
Mint in 1996 on a silver $20 coin with a cameo of Mr. Zurakowski.

He also came up with another aerobatic manoeuvre, the "falling leaf,"
putting the plane through a series of graceful sideslips. Again, this had
not been thought possible with a jet.

On March 25, 1958, Mr. Zurakowski piloted the prototype Avro Arrow on its
maiden flight. On its seventh flight, he took the Arrow to 1,600 km/h.

In 1958, he was awarded the McKee Trophy for his achievements in aviation.
The Arrow project was axed the following February and shortly afterward Mr.
Zurakowski retired. During a test flight over the Madawaska Valley
southeast of Algonquin Park, he'd noticed shoreline property near Barry's
Bay that he thought would be a good place to live. The area has many people
of Polish descent, and he and his wife opened Kartuzy Lodge for tourists.
Mr. Zurakowski was inducted into Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame in 1973 and
in 1997 was named a "Pioneer of Canadian Aviation" by the Western Canada
Aviation Museum in Winnipeg. In 2000, the Canadian Flight Test Centre
building in Cold Lake, Alta., was renamed in his honour.

Last summer, Zurakowski Park was opened in Barry's Bay. Mr. Zurakowski is
survived by his wife Anna, and sons George and Mark. A funeral service will
be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at St. Hedwig's Roman Catholic Church in
Barry's Bay

georgeo76
02-12-2004, 05:19 PM
S! Jan Zurakowski

http://webpages.charter.net/Stick_Fiend/images/buck2.gif
"I don't think it's quite fair to condemn a whole program because of a single slip-up. "
Fiend's Wings (http://webpages.charter.net/Stick_Fiend)

TheGozr
02-12-2004, 05:24 PM
http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

-GOZR
http://www.french.themotorhead.com/themotorhead_fighters/images/pix/il2fbtmhlogosmall.jpg <--Uncensored version IL2fb here (http://www.french.themotorhead.com/themotorhead_fighters/)