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View Full Version : Deck landing training in the SNJ



munnst
09-21-2004, 06:13 AM
Hi,

during ww2 pilots were trained to land on Carriers with the SNJ hooked equipped variant of the Texan (Harvard).
The hook had to be reset on the ground so if you couldn't get that bird on the carrier you had to return to base with hook well and truly between the legs :-).
I wonder if we will get an SNJ to practice with?

Dog.

munnst
09-21-2004, 06:13 AM
Hi,

during ww2 pilots were trained to land on Carriers with the SNJ hooked equipped variant of the Texan (Harvard).
The hook had to be reset on the ground so if you couldn't get that bird on the carrier you had to return to base with hook well and truly between the legs :-).
I wonder if we will get an SNJ to practice with?

Dog.

rfa0
09-24-2004, 03:24 PM
The A6M2 is probably good enough for training.

BlitzPig_Frat
09-24-2004, 06:56 PM
there were a whole lot of Wildcats and SBD's on the bottom of Lake Michigan, until the 80-90's when they were raised, via "real" carrier traps in "real" fleet aircraft by student pilots at "Great Lakes". So, you do have, or will be getting, the AC they practiced traps in. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fliger747
09-27-2004, 01:36 AM
Carrier quals were run where they could be with what was available! The two converted paddle steamers on Lake Michigan had the advantage of being safe from any submarine threat, though they wer slow, small and had no hangar or other facilities. Being close to the many mid-west training facilities was another advantage.

However that wasn't the end of the story as more advanced training and operational familiarization in (more or less current) 'fleet' types was necessary as well.

As noted, the attrition rate was high, my dad mentioned something like 5% fatalities in training. Old, frapped out combat aircraft frequently spent their remaining (brief?) days in training.

The original (they have several now) F4U at the Boeing Muesum of Flight in Seattle was fished out of lake Washington, near Sand Point NAS.