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View Full Version : Jessie's Girl Bass bugged?



case70
12-15-2013, 03:08 PM
Hi,

is it just me or is the hard score attack for Jessie's Girl / Bass bugged? From the display it appears that I play the two slides in the intro correct, but RS always counts them as failed.

armoury_R1
12-15-2013, 03:21 PM
It is just INCREDIBLY picky -- I have only ever succeeded in getting one of those slides to register as correctly played, and that's from having played the song maybe 10 times, and as you know there are four of those slides in the song -- and I strike out after failing the third one most times, once I got to the fourth but missed that and struck out.

Quite frustrating, considering the song is otherwise very easy, and indeed was my very first 100% in RS1.

Kynlore
12-15-2013, 06:47 PM
Slides and bends are more strict in the current game than the previous one. You have to be much more accurate with them now than you used to be.

TheJohnNewton
12-15-2013, 11:44 PM
Spurred on by your question I just tried the song out and got 100% on hard. The trick to the part you are having a problem with is to pluck the E string at the 7th fret about mid-way through the indicated B note. So pluck at the 5th fret, slide up to the 7th, slightly after the indicated mid-point of that B note (E string at the 7th) pluck it, then slide down. Using that technique I get a "perfect" in score attack pretty much every time on that riff.

Good luck.

armoury_R1
12-16-2013, 10:09 AM
^^ Thanks for that. Will try it this evening when I get home.

I guess the 'natural sustain' might not be loud enough to register, at least not at my skill level or with my entry-level bass, hence the need to actually play the B-note even though it's not indicated on the note highway.

Gold_Jim
12-16-2013, 09:55 PM
Listening to the original recording, there's no question that the original recording runs as charted, but that doesn't mean that the game will pick it up that way. Remember, in the studio, it's likely that the bass player was plugged directly into the board through a direct input. It's unlikely that Springfield brought his 'band' into the studio, and even if he did, they probably didn't make it to the final mix. The song was recorded while he was acting on General Hospital, and a lot of those heartthrobs, like David Soul and John Travolta went into the studio and recorded because they had instant marketability. Springfield is a heck of a guitar player in his own right, so he might have actually tracked his own rhythms.

Usually, in pop music, the bassist will plug into the board or through a D.I. unit and rarely do they use an amp. This is important, because it's why the bass lines are crystal clear. Since there would have been no room noise to compete with, the engineer and producer can get the bass levels very precise. They also use an incredible amount of compression, so when the bass slides up and down, the signal doesn't fall off in volume. It's why I like a wireless system on stage, they tend to compress your signal a lot.

Then there's the other studio trick where they double track the bass. In country music, you'll hear this referred to as tic-tac bass, and what they do is use two different basses or bass styles to thicken the bass sound. In country, they tend to track one fretless bass (whether it's a stand up or electric) and one fretted bass. In Jessie's Girl, it sounds like they may have run one bass channel through distortion and left the other clean. This maintains the bottom but gives the sound a grit at the same time. One way to do this is to have the bassist play the part twice. Since some guys aren't that great at 'doubling' their own parts, what they do is to make two tracks of bass and run one signal into a distortion and the other straight and then mix those down to a single track. Remember, back then, they didn't have unlimited tracks, so you have to 'bounce' tracks to get things done. Now, we just run as many track as we want and the master might contain literally hundreds of tracks where this song was likely done in 16 or less.

What's that go to do with this? Well, you're a bassist playing through a game trying to emulate what was played in perfect conditions in 1981. The odds are stacked against you. Therefore, cheating a little by playing the note at the B is almost expected. Rock on!

Kynlore
12-16-2013, 10:28 PM
The recording of the song was in Sound City, a documentary by Dave Grohl about the recording studio and the soundboard used. It is a very good movie. Dave Grohl has the board in his home studio now.

armoury_R1
12-19-2013, 05:30 AM
FWIW, by playing the B-note, I finally passed this. One strike, when I missed the first slide, but I got the rest. That was probably also the only missed note; just to satisfy the OCD in me, I guess I might give this another go some other time to get the 100%. Thanks to John Newton and PRS.

Gold_Jim
12-19-2013, 03:53 PM
FWIW, by playing the B-note, I finally passed this. One strike, when I missed the first slide, but I got the rest. That was probably also the only missed note; just to satisfy the OCD in me, I guess I might give this another go some other time to get the 100%. Thanks to John Newton and PRS.

Awesome!


The recording of the song was in Sound City, a documentary by Dave Grohl about the recording studio and the soundboard used. It is a very good movie. Dave Grohl has the board in his home studio now.

Yeah, that board recorded some very famous albums. Keith Olsen was very in demand. I saw that documentary, and he was looking for an analog board, and I think that's a Neve, if memory serves.