PDA

View Full Version : Strumming in Rocksmith



TheGotti
12-05-2013, 05:08 AM
You know a great mod to add to the game, would just be the ability to see which strum is an upstroke or downstroke. I typically will pause the game and try to count the beats, to figure it out, but I think it could be as easy as adding an small arrow to the right of the strum just so you know the beats. This one fix would significantly help people how to figure out the proper strumming patterns for the songs.

thoman23
12-05-2013, 06:59 AM
Yep, that would be my #1 request right now. It makes learning the rhythm parts much harder when you don't know the strumming pattern...at least for us beginners...maybe advanced players can just sort of wing it.

Actually my #1 request would be scored vocals, but that doesn't count cuz it's not happening. But I could see this one happening.

Jockstar1974
12-05-2013, 11:54 AM
You know a great mod to add to the game, would just be the ability to see which strum is an upstroke or downstroke. I typically will pause the game and try to count the beats, to figure it out, but I think it could be as easy as adding an small arrow to the right of the strum just so you know the beats. This one fix would significantly help people how to figure out the proper strumming patterns for the songs.
Absolutely agree mate. I posted a thread a while back about this. Strumming patterns are obviously very important in playing guitar. Seems strange that RS doesn't show these. Would be good to get an update to the game for this.

mrvega79
12-05-2013, 01:29 PM
Well, I think the most important thing to know is that your hand should pretty much always be strumming up and down, even when you're not actually striking the strings. This helps your strum remain steady and consistent with the beat. Watch videos of guitarists playing, you'll see that for most, their right hand is always moving, even if only very slightly.

This also makes it easier to read the strum patterns: When you see two strum bars one right after another, you know that the first is a Down strum, the second is Up. If there's a gap between them, then it will become Down (Up) Down (the Up is played in the air, not on the strings). This depends on how wide the gap is, of course. It could be something like Down (Up) (Down) Up .... you get the idea.

It should be fairly easy to work out most of the various rhythm patterns: A triplet will have three strum bars closely grouped together. Where as a normal Up/Down pattern will be evenly spaced. (Of course more complex songs, will be different. But a beginner probably shouldn't be working on those.)

After that, it's just listening to the beat, listening to what the guitar track is doing too.

Jockstar1974
12-06-2013, 07:48 AM
Well, I think the most important thing to know is that your hand should pretty much always be strumming up and down, even when you're not actually striking the strings. This helps your strum remain steady and consistent with the beat. Watch videos of guitarists playing, you'll see that for most, their right hand is always moving, even if only very slightly.

This also makes it easier to read the strum patterns: When you see two strum bars one right after another, you know that the first is a Down strum, the second is Up. If there's a gap between them, then it will become Down (Up) Down (the Up is played in the air, not on the strings). This depends on how wide the gap is, of course. It could be something like Down (Up) (Down) Up .... you get the idea.

It should be fairly easy to work out most of the various rhythm patterns: A triplet will have three strum bars closely grouped together. Where as a normal Up/Down pattern will be evenly spaced. (Of course more complex songs, will be different. But a beginner probably shouldn't be working on those.)

After that, it's just listening to the beat, listening to what the guitar track is doing too.


So you're telling me that there is strumming patterns in the game? And they are read as above?

berad88
12-06-2013, 07:53 AM
I agree with the OP. The next step Rocksmith should take is showing strumming patterns.

mrvega79
12-06-2013, 10:27 AM
So you're telling me that there is strumming patterns in the game? And they are read as above?

Yes, there are indeed strum patterns in the game. Although I agree they can be difficult to interpret. It's important to pay attention to the measure lines -- they run horizontally -- and to remember that in 4/4 timing, there will only be four beats.

The strum patterns are divisions of those four beats. So a single line in a measure means you strum once in that measure. Four lines in a measure means you strum all four beats (presumably up and down, although downstrokes have their own sound to them).

Now take one away, say the second line -- this gives you Down (up) Down Up. (where the beat in parentheses is not played)
Take away the third : Down Up (Down) Up

When the lines get closer together, you're dealing with 8th notes -- i.e., 8 strums in a measure, or 2 strums per beat. Just means you're going to fit the Down/Up pattern within a single beat.

And of course, you'll find a mix of 1/4 notes and 1/8 notes (and 1/16 notes, etc.) in a single measure.

The advantage of notated tab is that the strumming pattern is easier to see -- if there are 16th notes in a beat or beats, all strums will be notated using the 16th note diagram. Rocksmith is similar in that you'll come to recognize the look of 1/8 note strums or triplets etc. But it does take more effort.

That's why listening to what the guitar is doing in the actual song will help you out a lot -- it's actually easier to pick up on the rhythm pattern by listening to it, than reading it. Rhythm is a primitive function, after all. We were all primitives once!