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View Full Version : Why does everyone hate playing as Desmond or the Desmond storyline in AC?



srgntMagma
05-15-2013, 02:54 AM
Personally, in my opinion, I loved playing as Desmond, because I loved to see how his skills progressed as an Assassin after being in the Animus. As for the Desmond modern day storyline, it is what holds this series together. It's why I keep coming back to the series. The modern day storyline is so very interesting, and also provides great depth throughout the AC universe. It is what holds this series together. Why do people hate it so much?

ProletariatPleb
05-15-2013, 02:57 AM
He is bland, boring and has absolutely no personality.

His parts are half-assed and poorly designed, as if added just for the sake of adding it and they are very short.

Assassin_M
05-15-2013, 02:58 AM
The Modern storyline is what hooked me to the series....i believe it is that way for most people who love the series...hating Desmond is out of hand (I don't hate Desmond) He always took the backseat to his Ancestors. when you have 2 characters and one is running, stabbing, jumping and flying all over an accurately recreated era of history and the other is reading emails and swimming in toilets, you`ll automatically forget Desmond...we`v had so little time with him, they never made the effort to try and make us like him as half as we liked his ancestors...

I enjoyed Desmond...can`t say he couldn't have been MUCH better, though

EarthlyStudio1
05-15-2013, 02:58 AM
Because they think every single game character needs to be full of "personality", rather than actually be a relatable character. They don't understand that you're not SUPPOSED to want to be like him, rather than be HIM. Other people have the reason that the modern-day story is hard to follow, so they don't give it a chance. That just goes to show how complex it is.


He is bland, boring and has absolutely no personality.

Exhibit A.

ProletariatPleb
05-15-2013, 03:02 AM
Because they think every single game character needs to be full of "personality", rather than actually be a relatable character. They don't understand that you're not SUPPOSED to want to be like him, rather than be HIM. Other people have the reason that the modern-day story is hard to follow, so they don't give it a chance. That just goes to show how complex it is.



Exhibit A.
Do you like a rock placed somewhere because you can pretend to be it?

EarthlyStudio1
05-15-2013, 03:08 AM
Do you like a rock placed somewhere because you can pretend to be it?

He wasn't a rock though. He talked, moved, and did whatever. His personality was that of a very comedic guy. He was relatable. He can be connected to because he wasn't some "badass" assassin from ages past that ran on rooftops and jumped into hay barrels for a living. He was the most relatable character out of any assassin and it made sense. A rock is blank, doesn't move, and has nothing to even relate to. I hope you get what I'm saying.

GreySkellig
05-15-2013, 03:25 AM
I understand the need for the modern storyline. If nothing else, it provides continuity and motivation for the historical part, which is the main selling point of the game, and the part I most enjoy. There were a few points where I got close to rooting for Desmond. He was a fun way to be swept along in the story, the perfect bewildered protagonist on whom to project my own bafflement at the increasingly complex plot. His interactions with Lucy, especially in AC2 and AC:B, were the nearest he came to an interesting character.

By Revelations, however, he had morphed into an irritating and poorly developed character. Most of his dialogue, particularly in 3, consisted of complaining and angry outbursts. I was happy, I confess, to finally see him go. But as one last blow, all the promises about Desmond becoming an "Ultimate Assassin" in AC3 were seemingly forgotten. None of his action sequences after AC2 had quite the pop to make him seem like an actual assassin in my book.

In the end, I thought Desmond's potential was seriously wasted in later games. Ironically, my frustration on this point is probably a result of Ubi focusing on the main historical portions of the game, the bits I liked most to begin with.

The modern storyline had t be snappily written with some compelling mysteries and sharp dialogue in order to remain interesting, given that it was patently not the historical setting most players turn out for. While those interest-generating elements were there in the beginning, they eventually took something of a back seat to melodrama and ultra-easy action.

Alright, go ahead and flame me. I'm ready. Tel my family I loved them.

EarthlyStudio1
05-15-2013, 03:35 AM
By Revelations, however, he had morphed into an irritating and poorly developed character. Most of his dialogue, particularly in 3, consisted of complaining and angry outbursts. I was happy, I confess, to finally see him go. But as one last blow, all the promises about Desmond becoming an "Ultimate Assassin" in AC3 were seemingly forgotten. None of his action sequences after AC2 had quite the pop to make him seem like an actual assassin in my book.

I think that in 3 they purposely made him have angry outbursts for the purpose of showing his character finally taking charge. Everyone kept complaining about how he was a push-over and just went along with everything and Ubisoft took notice by making him finally go off about everything they were telling him to do in 3.

Assassin_M
05-15-2013, 03:37 AM
By Revelations, however, he had morphed into an irritating and poorly developed character. Most of his dialogue, particularly in 3, consisted of complaining and angry outbursts. I was happy, I confess, to finally see him go. But as one last blow, all the promises about Desmond becoming an "Ultimate Assassin" in AC3 were seemingly forgotten. None of his action sequences after AC2 had quite the pop to make him seem like an actual assassin in my book.

I actually started only liking him in Revelations...i`m surprised you liked him more in ACB and AC II, especially AC II...since he only appears in that game for exactly 15 minutes...brotherhood`s interactions felt like something out of Scooby Doo to me...

GreySkellig
05-15-2013, 03:58 AM
To each his own, I suppose. It is worth mentioning I didn't play the platforming levels in Revelations (I was in something of a rush to finish before AC3 arrived) and I've heard they add to his character somewhat.

Assassin_M
05-15-2013, 04:03 AM
To each his own, I suppose. It is worth mentioning I didn't play the platforming levels in Revelations (I was in something of a rush to finish before AC3 arrived) and I've heard they add to his character somewhat.
If you`re not into first person puzzle platforming, then you may not like it too much....It`s Desmond narrating his past, hearing voices from the past and seeing little visions of the past....it`s for certain tastes...I loved them, not sure I can recommend to anyone else, though..

SixKeys
05-15-2013, 04:05 AM
I enjoyed the Desmond bits from the very beginning. Every time I finished a sequence, I was anxious to get back to the real world and see what new mysteries there were to uncover. In AC3 the historical story couldn't hold my interest, I was just dying to know how Desmond's story was going to end.

EarthlyStudio1
05-15-2013, 04:12 AM
I enjoyed the Desmond bits from the very beginning. Every time I finished a sequence, I was anxious to get back to the real world and see what new mysteries there were to uncover. In AC3 the historical story couldn't hold my interest, I was just dying to know how Desmond's story was going to end.

This.

Rockpixel
05-15-2013, 04:13 AM
I thought he was a pretty good character and I actually loved his missions. Although, I wish he didn't take the apple with him on the Abstergo raid. Anti-climactic.

joey-4321_web
05-15-2013, 05:21 AM
I enjoyed the Desmond bits from the very beginning. Every time I finished a sequence, I was anxious to get back to the real world and see what new mysteries there were to uncover. In AC3 the historical story couldn't hold my interest, I was just dying to know how Desmond's story was going to end.

****ing this except for the ac3 part

every time I got out of the animus I looked at everything, interacted with everything, and talked to every one. I hate that they made the conversations optional, people easily missed them.

LoyalACFan
05-15-2013, 08:59 AM
Other people have the reason that the modern-day story is hard to follow, so they don't give it a chance. That just goes to show how complex it is.

LOL. Desmond's story was not complex. It had the ILLUSION of being complex, because every game ended in some totally unexpected "WTF?" moment that was only partially explained in the next game. If you strip away all of the superfluous cryptic messages (i.e. the Truth puzzles and Juno's bizarre narration of the failed attempts to deflect the solar flare) you get a story that had a very original concept behind it, but was ultimately poorly told and forgettable.

That said, a lot of people hate Desmond because his parts of the story were largely told via cutscenes, with a little bit of boring gameplay thrown in. Would you rather run across the rooftops of the Holy Land/Renaissance Italy/Colonial America, or read emails about yogurt and iPods in your ancestor's basement? And this is coming from someone who actually liked Desmond up until his story came to an infuriatingly unsatisfying finale.

TinyTemplar
05-15-2013, 09:09 AM
Why does everyone hate playing as Desmond or the Desmond storyline in AC?

Well, I personally like how he died... or that he died. Can't decide what I like more.

poptartz20
05-15-2013, 09:30 AM
Umm... I've always thought of Desmond as a vessel to which we play the true story. I never really hated him nor did I find myself really falling in love with his character. It was basically understood that Desmond never really wanted to be in his position in the first place. With that comes a wide range of emotions from being, scared, whining, bitterness, some more that go on down the list, and finally an acceptance of how you are just a pawn in the greater scheme of things. I can't say he didn't act appropriately considering the small bits we did see of him also always being thrown into his situations.

TinyTemplar
05-15-2013, 10:07 AM
In last two games it wasn't even Desmond anymore. I liked him before, he was a plesant, good-looking, kind man and I waited for him to return in the next game.

But then I've got this:
https://twimg0-a.akamaihd.net/profile_images/1644830582/Desmond.png
It was the biggest dissapointment in my entire life. I was shocked as never before. "Wtf??? Okay, I pretended that it never happend and they would fix it in AC 3.

But in the next game:
http://m5.paperblog.com/i/34/340585/ss-review-assassins-creed-3-L-UW0Ydv.png
They "fixed" it :nonchalance:

Accordingly, the real Desmond died for me in Brotherhood.

Legendz54
05-15-2013, 10:09 AM
I enjoyed it.. Desmond and the Modern Day is one of the key Parts in the story for me. I always enjoyed playing each part to his story as the games came out. To me AC is not just about the setting.. Its about how the Actual "Assassins Creed" fits into the TWCB and unraveling those key secrets.

Dag_B
05-15-2013, 10:19 AM
I do not hate him but I wished we could've seen more from him. His passages were mostly short and most of the story happens in the intro and end, with only a few real "important" things happening in the middle. Most time you just get some (more or less) random information in that part, so sometimes it just felt like a filler to me. Sometimes I left the animus, ran around and got disappointed because there was nothing left I could do (finished all dialogs, read all emails and so on).
AC3 did better, where you even had small missions with him. I wished we had gotten a lot more of this, Desmonds doing real things, instead of always the same hiding-reading email stuff which happens mostly.

And I am sad that they seem to do a more AC1-like modern day story for IV (being "yourself" in Abstergo Entertainment does not sound like there'd be actual parkour and climbing gameplay). So I fear we will again just walk around, read emails and that's it.
It was ok for AC1, but seems to be odd to go back to this. It's But maybe my interpretations of those bits of information are just wrong.

pacmanate
05-15-2013, 12:37 PM
I didn't mind Desmond. What I did mind was:

1. Poorly used
2. Bad Screentime
3. Short as hell segments

In my eyes, Desmond himself wasn't the problem, but the way he was utilised was.

dxsxhxcx
05-15-2013, 12:56 PM
if it wasn't for the modern days I would've gave up this franchise years ago, since in AC4 they'll use this excuse that "we" are the person in the animus, I'll wait until "AC5" to see if this whole story that began with Desmond will have its conclusion, finished or not (in AC5 or whatever they'll call the game after AC4) one thing is certain, after 2014 I'm done with this franchise...

and I wouldn't be surprised if Ubisoft does the same depending of how well Watch Dogs sell when they release it, they'll probably milk that franchise as well like they did with AC...

Kaschra
05-15-2013, 01:37 PM
I've always liked Desmond, but it's really bad how Ubisoft wasted his potential :/

SixKeys
05-15-2013, 02:31 PM
That said, a lot of people hate Desmond because his parts of the story were largely told via cutscenes, with a little bit of boring gameplay thrown in. Would you rather run across the rooftops of the Holy Land/Renaissance Italy/Colonial America, or read emails about yogurt and iPods in your ancestor's basement? And this is coming from someone who actually liked Desmond up until his story came to an infuriatingly unsatisfying finale.

Why does it have to be either-or? I enjoyed running around historical locations as Desmond's ancestors, but I also enjoyed the friendly bickering between the modern assassins, reading mysterious e-mails from Alan Rikkin and Erudito and trying to figure out what exactly was going on. In AC1 we got a lot of information about the state of the AC universe version of 2012, like mass exodus in North America, the African population nearly being wiped out due to disease, some kind of sinister fluoride incident that Abstergo was involved in etc. In ACB we got Erudito and the inconsistencies between William and "another" William writing e-mails to Lucy at different times. (Which turned out to be a hint that she was a traitor.) All this stuff had so much potential which was largely wasted because the devs were in a hurry to dump Desmond altogether.

In AC3 I felt no connection even between the returning characters. I think William's presence soured the whole atmosphere TBH. Before it was a bunch of kids on the run from the bad guys, doing their own thing, arguing but also showing that they cared about each other. It helped that they were all roughly the same age. Then William was thrown into the mix and we got an awkward father-son relationship with William being the boss and Desmond being portrayed as a whiny kid. I don't want to identify with a whiny kid who's expected to obey his parents, I want to feel like a badass assassin who's stepping up to the responsibility of saving the world. Gone was the camaraderie between the team members; Rebecca wasn't her old spirited self and Shaun mostly acted as a mediator between Desmond and his father. (And some kind of soapbox for the devs to air their views about American politics.) William had no respect for Desmond, hence the player felt like the underdog, like we were constantly supposed to be proving something as opposed to being pumped to finally showing what Desmond was capable of. When William finally showed his approval, it didn't feel right. We shouldn't have to be looking for his approval, we should be doing things because it's the right thing to do. The only reason the final scene between him and Desmond had any emotional impact was because Desmond finally had the upper hand over his dad, saying "no, your way won't work, my choice is the right one".

In short, Desmond needed to become the leader and throughout most of AC3, that task was given to William, an NPC, instead.

Sushiglutton
05-15-2013, 02:55 PM
I enjoyed following the modern day story from AC1 to AC:B. In AC:R I felt they dropped the ball by: 1) not explaining why one of the key characters had been killed, 2) Horrendous FP-platform sequences, 3) Animus island and given subject 16 a normal body (it was okey as long as he was a black blob). On the shores of animus island all my interest for the modern day storyline died. And after playing AC3 I was so glad that it did, because the way modern day was handled was very poorly in that game. It was like Corey May had been given the order to kill off as many characters as he could in ten minutes of cutscenes.

I think the idea to turn Desmond from a labrat into a badass assassin, as good as it is on paper, was fundamentally flawed. The problem is that once he becomes the latter there is no contrast between the modern part and the historical one. Instead the modern becomes a gimped version of the past. I think the direction in AC4 (presumably) to return to a slower, more cerebral modern day, as it was in AC1, is excellent. Perhaps I will start enjoying it again.

Bastiaen
05-15-2013, 03:07 PM
I agree with the OP. I'm trying to be hyped for AC4, but with the extreme decrease in emphasis on the modern story, I find it difficult to care too much.