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projectpat06
10-11-2012, 09:40 PM
-Rebels vs an Empire in a war of oppression vs democracy
-A hero who's home is burned and destroyed
-A wise old mentor who is secretly a member of a group of deadly yet wise warriors (Jedi = assassins).
-A young hero who seeks out these skills from the old mentor
-As the hero hones in on his skills over time, he blindly fights with the rebels against the Oppression
-Hero leaves the rebels to pursue his own agenda
-Hero's father is actually part of the empire (?)but is also a member of this group of skilled and wise warriors (was a jedi / assassin)
-Hero helps to end the war while pursing his own quest (killing the sith which is basically the equivalent to the templars)


The only thing that's different really is Luke Skywalker never killed rebels, but he was basically on his own side along with Han Solo.


Just thought this was kind of interesting. My old Literature teacher back in high school once said that no general theme or story is original anymore. They are all just the same stories but in a new form with various deviations.

thoughts?

Slayer_WTF
10-11-2012, 09:59 PM
Genius.

Locopells
10-11-2012, 10:01 PM
Yeah well, I watched Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade the other day where he goes under a Venice landmark, through a hidded catacombe, finds and old tomb, then pops up through a grating in the square in front...

Sickull
10-11-2012, 10:08 PM
"There is nothing new under the sun." You ever see that episode of Southpark called "The Simpsons Already Did It"?

To point out some other similarities Abstergo is this giant organization/shadow government that has the ability to change events in their favor and pretty much have control over everything yet have tricked the everyday man into thinking he is free to me that sounds like The Party from Orson Welles 1984 and I hate to bring Anime into this but Naruto also has two groups of people fighting for peace but their methods of achieving it differ greatly, you could even compare a bit of AC to the Matrix. Even though these stories have similar aspects it's all those tiny details that make them end up going in vastly different directions.

kudos17
10-11-2012, 10:38 PM
You can compare a lot of things with similar themes, and many things will appear the same. That's not uncommon at all in storytelling. There are certain logical paths a story takes, and certain logical elements a good story has. That means, of course, it will share those paths and elements with other stories.

Where it becomes interesting, however, is how those elements are used and what surrounds the paths taken.

LoyalACFan
10-11-2012, 10:51 PM
My old Literature teacher back in high school once said that no general theme or story is original anymore. They are all just the same stories but in a new form with various deviations.

If you want to get really technical, there NEVER was an "original" story theme. Every adventure story ever written has been based on themes that were present in events that already happened. An unlikely hero going up against an oppressive empire? You could take that all the way back to the ancient Greeks and Persians. Hero trained by a wise, renowned master? Alexander the Great was tutored by Aristotle. George Lucas didn't come up with these themes on his own, they've existed for centuries. Probably even before the examples I gave.

projectpat06
10-11-2012, 10:59 PM
If you want to get really technical, there NEVER was an "original" story theme. Every adventure story ever written has been based on themes that were present in events that already happened. An unlikely hero going up against an oppressive empire? You could take that all the way back to the ancient Greeks and Persians. Hero trained by a wise, renowned master? Alexander the Great was tutored by Aristotle. George Lucas didn't come up with these themes on his own, they've existed for centuries. Probably even before the examples I gave.

Oh I know, ha I never meant for that to sound like George Lucas' story was original. I was just using is as a comparison to show how it had its similarities. The discussion my teacher had used a long time ago when I took his class was that even shakespeare wasn't original. He used to say he was the biggest plagiarist of all the great writers. This just came to mind when I was thinking about the conflict between Britain and the colonials and how Star Wars seemed similar. Then the idea of Connor and this secret society of skilled assassins versus the Templars reminded me of the Jedi (who were basically near extinct) vs the sith who had taken control of the empire.

GreatBeyonder
10-12-2012, 03:17 AM
Charles Lee: Achilles never told you what happened to your father...

Connor: He told me enough! He told me you killed him!

Charles Lee: No.... I am your father.

Connor: NOOOOO!

(Is genuinely half expecting this scene in AC3)

LoyalACFan
10-12-2012, 04:29 AM
Charles Lee: Achilles never told you what happened to your father...

Connor: He told me enough! He told me you killed him!

Charles Lee: No.... I am your father.

Connor: NOOOOO!

(Is genuinely half expecting this scene in AC3)

But... if he gets his hand cut off, he can't dual-wield :(

zhengyingli
10-12-2012, 07:06 AM
Aside from the themes, I feel the setting itself is very similar to the first Rurouni Kenshin OVA/manga, (Spoilers below to who hasn't watched/read it, yet) as opposed to Star Wars:

Connor's drive for justice came from his village being burned down.
Kenshin's drive for strength came from his inability to protect the people around him, which later turned into a quest for justice.

Both settings are somewhat about the birth of a new era.

(According to the story trailer) Connor and his master argued philosophy.
Kenshin and his master also argued philosophy, and left the latter's tutelage to go into the city to be, in the former's opinion, more productive.

Connor seems to believe in Washington's ideals, and therefore the latter may have some degree influence on Connor's judgment.
Kenshin became a personal assassin for Kogoro, one of the three men responsible for the birth of the Meiji era. At the time, Kenshin blindly accepts Kogoro's version of justice.

Just a thought:
Kenshin's view on life changes throughout his assassin days, which is interesting as that's similar to Revelations/Embers in some ways:

Ezio lost Cristina through him losing the apple to Savonarola, became guarded from feelings, but found himself a woman later on.
Kenshin lost his wife through a tragedy partially of his own making, became a wanderer, but later settled down with another.

It's a given that Connor's definition of justice might shift to a certain degree throughout ACIII. What intrigues me more is whether he'll learn anything about life itself, and if so, how profound would that be compared to Kenshin, or Ezio.

NOLA_Assassin
10-12-2012, 12:04 PM
Luke Skywalker isn't Native American though...

Calvarok
10-12-2012, 08:18 PM
You can compare ANY story to ANY story if you strip out all the things that don't relate and leave the things that do.