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DIRTY-MAC
05-20-2004, 11:46 AM
Dont forget to read part two,
NOMOHAN II
http://www.danford.net/nomonhan.htm
Enjoy

DIRTY-MAC
05-20-2004, 11:46 AM
Dont forget to read part two,
NOMOHAN II
http://www.danford.net/nomonhan.htm
Enjoy

Scarn3
05-20-2004, 11:59 AM
I would so like to see this.

I-15's,I-153's, I-16's vs KI-27's,(and possibly Type 97's) bomber intercepts, ground attacks and all before the war in Europe started.

CowboyTodd41
05-20-2004, 12:00 PM
Great read! Thanks http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/11.gif

http://mywebpage.netscape.com/Tgan92/newsig.gif

LEXX_Luthor
05-20-2004, 06:54 PM
Even better is 1937+ air WAR in China where Saburo got his training.

---> http://www.dalnet.se/~surfcity/sino-japanese.htm

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>3 October 1939

On 3 October the Kulishenko's group attacked Hankou aerodrome, which by then was in the deep rear of the enemy. The SBs could not reach this far and the Japanese did not expect any attacks. In the open the Japanese had located a naval aviation aerodrome designated "Base W." It was also used by pilots of Army Aviation. On this day the airbase prepared to receive new aircraft ferried from Japan and representatives of the fleet command and the city authorities had assembled there.

Nine DB-3s flew to the target unobserved, in a tight wedge, maintaining radio silence. They attacked as the ceremony was in progress. Aircraft stood in four rows, wing tip to wing tip. From an altitude of 8700m http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif the Soviet volunteers bombed them with a mix of high explosive, fragmentation-high explosive and incendiary bombs. According to the reports of the crews, most of the bombs exploded along the rows of aircraft, which were tossed in every direction from the force of the blasts, with many burning. Antiaircraft was silent and only a single fighter took off from the enormous bonfire below. In it flew the later famous Japanese ace Saburo Sakai, but he was unable to catch the departing and lightened DB-3s. The Japanese identified the unknown bombers as SBs and were very surprised at their appearance.

Reportedly 64 aircraft were destroyed or damaged, with 130 people killed and 300 wounded. The fuel reserves burned of three hours. Japanese sources confirm the loss of fifty machines. Killed were seven senior officers of Captain 1st Rank and higher and twelve more were wounded. Amongst the latter was Rear Admiral Tsukahara, commander of the 1st Rengo Kokutai. A period of mourning was declared and the airfield commandant was shot. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-sad.gif Lieutenant (junior grade) Kanetake Okazaki (Class 62) of the 12th Kokutai was killed during the day.
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14 October 1939

The attack on Hankou aerodrome was repeated on 14 October. Twelve DB-3s flew to the target, again led by Kulishenko. But just after dropping their bombs they were attacked by Japanese fighters and three bombers received damage. Wounded, Kulishenko flew his bomber as far as the city Wangxian, where he landed on the Yangtze River about 100-150 m. from the bank. After the aircraft came to a halt, he lowered the landing gear and the aircraft began to sink. Kulishenko died of his wounds. The aircraft was later pulled from the water and repaired.

Reportedly on this occasion at Hankou 36 Japanese aircraft were destroyed by the bombing. It is possible that the Japanese suffered even greater losses - about forty naval and army machines. Later there was a third attack which raised Japanese losses (according to Soviet reports) to 136 aircraft.
One of the wounded airmen at Hankou was the ace-to-be Mototsuna Yoshida of the 12th Kokutai (14 victories) while PO3c Isamu Ochi (Pilot 41) from the same unit was killed. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


The Japanese responded in kind with a 72 bomber raid, and Chinese had cannone armed French D510 waiting for them...

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>4 November 1939
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....The G3Ms came over in two formations, each with 36 aircraft. Captain Okuda (nicknamed 'King of the Bombers'), commander of the 13th Ku, led the first formation with all of the aircraft from 13th Kokutai. The Chinese responded by sending two formations against the attackers. The first Japanese formation was heavily attacked by seven Dewoitine D.510s of the 17th PS, led by Captain Shen Tse-Liu and seven I-15bis from the 27th PS led by Captain Hsie Chuan-Ho. The 27th PS first made contact with the 13th Ku about 4,000m over Fenghuang Shan. The Chinese Air Raid Warning Net had given ample warning and the Chinese fighters, equipped with oxygen and radio receivers in the lead aircraft, were able to climb and attack the Japanese from above. Diving down at 65 degrees from behind, the I-15bis concentrated on the leading flight of G3Ms. After the initial pass, the I-15bis followed up with firing passes from the rear at the same level or slightly below. Then came the cannon armed D510. Captain Shen led his squadron in a level attack from the front. (Past experience had shown that when firing in a dive, the spring tension of the drum magazine in the Hispano HS-404 cannon was insufficient to feed the gun causing stoppages.) This time, under ideal conditions, Shen was able to make one devastating head-on pass on Okuda's G3M. Multiple hits by the deadly 20mm cannon set Okuda's G3M on fire at the right wing root. The fire then spread to the fuselage fuel tanks. The G3M then nosed over in a dive, which resulted in both wings snapping away. Shen and his squadron turned around to attack the Japanese formation form the rear. This was when the concentrated firepower of the G3Ms began to tell. Shen's D510 No. 5921 was damaged and he made a forced landing in which he was injured. Another D510 (No. 5924 flown by Lieutenant Chen Kwei-min) was damaged in the fuel tank but managed to land safely. Three 27th PS I-15bis were slightly damaged. Another G3M was shot out of formation smoking heavily but was not seen to crash by the time the Chinese fighters retired.

The second Chinese formation was led by Group vice-commander Wang Han-Hsun and included nine I-15bis led by Captain Ma Kwok-Lim of the 29th PS and six I-16s of the 26th PS. Included in Ma's group were Lieutenant Teng Chung-Kai, now promoted to Squadron vice-commander. They met the Kisarazu and Kanoya formation over Taiping-shi Airfield. Ma led the I-15bis in a vertical diving pass on the leading flight of the formation. After the initial pass, the I-15bis turned back to attack from below and behind. They were joined by two I-16s from the 26th PS, which had become separated from their formation. After the first two passes, the volume of return fire from the Japanese formation was seen to appreciably slacken. The lead ship from the Shotai to the right of the leading shotai was seen to catch fire and gradually descend below the formation. Teng in I-15bis No. 2903 was credited with hitting this aircraft and contributing to it falling out of formation. In a final firing pass from behind and below, the concentrated return fire from the Japanese formation hit Teng's aircraft and he crashed to his death. Wang Han-Hsun in I-15bis "V-2" was wounded and made a forced landing. All but one of the other I-15bis were damaged and three more had to make forced landings (I-15bis nos. 2910, 2904, 2907). Both of the 26th PS I-16s were also shot up badly, one, No. 2609 crashed at Jintang, killing its pilot Lieutenant Tuan Wan-Yu and the other, no. 2604 force landed at Pengshang.

During the attack the Japanese dropped over 100 bombs on Fenghuang Shan Airfield. The second Japanese formation of 36 aircraft dropped over 200 bombs on Wenjiang Air Field. They destroyed one aircraft and two trainers on the ground. After the battle, the Chinese found three wrecks and the bodies of Okuda and one of his Buntaicho. The Japanese, however, admitted to a total of 4 losses.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>