PDA

View Full Version : Newly Discovered Sakai Story



Sakai9745
06-28-2004, 06:48 PM
I do not know if this is true. I have never seen this in print before, nor have I ever heard about it in my studies of this Japanese ace. It wasn't even mentioned in the book "Samurai". Mr. Sakai did relate a story about not wanting to attack a plane with a wounded pilot who initially did not want to fight back - it is that factoid that makes me wonder about this newest story.

Source is -

http://www.frenkenstein.com/ww2/japan/Aces/Saburo_Sakai.htm

I intend to look into this matter further. If anyone can confirm or deny this tale, please let me know. If this story does hold up, then my respect and admiration for this fine man just went through the roof.

Here's an interesting story that just might be true...
Several years ago, a former Dutch military nurse contacted the Japanese Military, attempting to locate a Japanese fighter pilot that spared her life over New Guinea in 1942. She was flying in a Dutch military C-47 at low altitude over dense jungle. On board were 11 wounded soldiers and 6 children being evacuated from a combat area. Suddenly, a Japanese Zero appeared alongside the plane. It is not hard to imagination their panic as she and the children began frantically waving, hoping to ward off an attack. After a few moments of terror, the Zero pilot waved back, gave a quick wing wobble and flew away. The C-47 erupted with cheers.
For over fifty years, this Dutch nurse wanted to meet the pilot who had spared their lives. The Japanese Military located that pilot and it was none other than Saburo Sakai, who had been flying combat air patrol on that day. Sakai had thought about downing the C-47 for a moment as was the order of the day, but seeing the waving hands and terrified faces, he was moved to mercy.

Al - SF, Calif

"Defense Dept regrets to inform you that your sons are dead cause they were stupid."

Sakai9745
06-28-2004, 06:48 PM
I do not know if this is true. I have never seen this in print before, nor have I ever heard about it in my studies of this Japanese ace. It wasn't even mentioned in the book "Samurai". Mr. Sakai did relate a story about not wanting to attack a plane with a wounded pilot who initially did not want to fight back - it is that factoid that makes me wonder about this newest story.

Source is -

http://www.frenkenstein.com/ww2/japan/Aces/Saburo_Sakai.htm

I intend to look into this matter further. If anyone can confirm or deny this tale, please let me know. If this story does hold up, then my respect and admiration for this fine man just went through the roof.

Here's an interesting story that just might be true...
Several years ago, a former Dutch military nurse contacted the Japanese Military, attempting to locate a Japanese fighter pilot that spared her life over New Guinea in 1942. She was flying in a Dutch military C-47 at low altitude over dense jungle. On board were 11 wounded soldiers and 6 children being evacuated from a combat area. Suddenly, a Japanese Zero appeared alongside the plane. It is not hard to imagination their panic as she and the children began frantically waving, hoping to ward off an attack. After a few moments of terror, the Zero pilot waved back, gave a quick wing wobble and flew away. The C-47 erupted with cheers.
For over fifty years, this Dutch nurse wanted to meet the pilot who had spared their lives. The Japanese Military located that pilot and it was none other than Saburo Sakai, who had been flying combat air patrol on that day. Sakai had thought about downing the C-47 for a moment as was the order of the day, but seeing the waving hands and terrified faces, he was moved to mercy.

Al - SF, Calif

"Defense Dept regrets to inform you that your sons are dead cause they were stupid."

Merlin (FZG_Immel)
06-28-2004, 07:05 PM
well, if its true, its something really to admire.

------------------------------
www.checksix-fr.com (http://www.checksix-fr.com) Il2/FB/AEP co-webmaster
------------------------------------------------------------
Slot 2 pilot of the Virtual Haute Voltige team, and live video director

http://www.haute-voltige.com/virtualHVteam/concept.htm

BigKahuna_GS
06-28-2004, 08:39 PM
S!

I remember reading a story like this in Aviation History Magazine. Mr.Sakai is an honorable man.


----------

CCJ: What do you define as the most important things a fighter pilot must know to be successful, relating to air combat maneuvering?

Robert S. Johnson :
It's pretty simple, really. Know the absolute limits of your plane's capabilities.
Know its strengths and weaknesses. Know the strengths and weaknesses of you enemy's fighters. Never fight the way your enemy fights best. Always fight the way you fight best. Never be predictable.

In "Fighter Aces," aviation historians Raymond Tolliver
and Trevor Constable compared Johnson's record with that of two German aces.
Werner Molders was the first ace to score 100 aerial victories and Erich Hartmann is the top scoring ace of all time with 352.

The authors noted that
Johnson "emerges impressively from this comparison." He downed 28 planes in 91 sorties, while Molders took 142 sorties to do the same, and Hartmann, 194.
________



http://www.aviationartcentral.com/images/art/stokes/stokes-turkeyshoot.jpg

"Angels of Okinawa"

ELEM
06-29-2004, 02:03 AM
Yes, I've read this somewhere before, and not on the internet. Can't remember where, but I'm quite sure it's true.

I wouldn't join any club that would have ME as member!

http://img35.photobucket.com/albums/v107/Elem_Klimov/I-16_desktop.jpg http://img35.photobucket.com/albums/v107/Elem_Klimov/dhm_787_small.jpg

ploughman
06-29-2004, 02:55 AM
I've only heard two stories about this guy and in both of them he was mercifull. Moderation in war may be imbecility, but in a man?
I had read that Hartman's last kill in the war was a Russian pilot celebrating the coming end of hostilities by performing aerobatics over Prague. While Hartman had every right to shoot down the Russian, it seemed a very futile and merciless thing to do.

Aztek_Eagle
06-29-2004, 07:38 PM
read that on imperial japanese navy or army aces of ww2

RAC_Pips
06-29-2004, 10:43 PM
The author Henry Sakaida first published that story in an magazine interview with Saburo back in '92. The plane was a KLILM DC-3 and it was escaping from the Dutch East Indies. I'll see if I can dig up the mag.

Saburo also tells that story in the video/DVD series 'Hunters Of The Sky'.

[This message was edited by RAC_Pips on Tue June 29 2004 at 09:52 PM.]

VOL_Hans
06-30-2004, 01:20 AM
Now thats honor!

You know that the transport would have been an incredably easy target for him to add one more kill tag to his plane, but instead he broke off.

As for Hartmanns last kill... The war WAS still on, and his opponents WAS IN the war zone, in a COMBAT FIGHTER...

It's true that Hartmann could have let him go...But if that Russian had found Hartmann doing aerobatics, would he have spared the trigger?

http://www.altitude.us/missions/The%20Volunteers/hanssig.jpg

drapis
06-30-2004, 02:53 AM
actually, I think the Russian was performing aerobatics over Brno (about 100 km E. of Prague)

just to be precise... http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Killing for peace is like whoring for virginity.

VOL_Hans
07-01-2004, 10:22 AM
Dosent matter where the Russian was goofing off at.

Think about it, if Pokryshkin had seen a German doing aerobatics, I can garuntee he wouldn't have let him go. He'd have done the same as Hartmann: Kill him.

http://www.altitude.us/missions/The%20Volunteers/hanssig.jpg

kchickenlord
07-09-2004, 02:59 PM
The hatered instilled in the people of all nations during the war, didnt disapear the moment peace was declared, it takes time for people to adjust and understand that the people they were killing were just that, people.
Given the chance many pilots would have attacked the russian pilot if they had been in hartmans shoes.

lbhskier37
07-09-2004, 04:48 PM
How long did this Sakai guy live after the war? I took a class in vehicle dynamics and most of the tire stuff we learned was from a guy named Sakai, I'm wondering if its the same guy. I know all the tire data was pretty old, probably the fifties or sixties.

http://lbhskier37.freeservers.com/pics/Killasig6.jpg (http://www.il2skins.com/?action=list&whereauthorid=lbhkilla&comefrom=display&ts=1049772896)
Official "uber190n00b"

"Big cannons are only for skilless pilots who can't shoot shraight enough to hit a target with a smaller caliber round."-310thcopperhead

RAC_Pips
07-09-2004, 05:08 PM
Saburo Sakai dies at the age of 84, in the year 2000.

After the war he managed to start up a small printing shop, in which most of his employees were the wives and children of his former comrades. That, and his efforts to reconcile with his former enemies, took up all of his time.

lbhskier37
07-09-2004, 05:45 PM
So he never did research into modeling tire dynamics, damn, must be another Sakai.

http://lbhskier37.freeservers.com/pics/Killasig6.jpg (http://www.il2skins.com/?action=list&whereauthorid=lbhkilla&comefrom=display&ts=1049772896)
Official "uber190n00b"

"Big cannons are only for skilless pilots who can't shoot shraight enough to hit a target with a smaller caliber round."-310thcopperhead