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PhonedZero
04-07-2012, 12:49 AM
Near the end of the dlc, you enter a room that has a broken column as its only feature. The symbol itself holds importance for Freemasonry, symbolizing the death or loss of a particularly honorable Mason, or who has passed too soon. Why is it included here? Especially so close to the end, i think it was in the 3rd to last room. No-one would really pick up on it except a Mason. I searched the forums and no-one has mentioned it yet.

LightRey
04-07-2012, 01:01 AM
I'm not sure which room you are referring to. Could you be more specific or provide a screenshot or time in a video?

PhonedZero
04-07-2012, 04:41 AM
http://i1196.photobucket.com/albums/aa406/phonedzero/broken-1.jpg

memory seven, not sure if this is also supposed an acacia tree or not, another popular Masonic symbol.

Seems odd to devote a room to this obscure reference. Although the person who formalized the broken column as a Masonic symbol was Jeremy Cross, possibly a cryptic reference to Daniel Cross. Abstergo Subject #4?

GeneralTrumbo
04-07-2012, 08:59 AM
Wow...great find. This is why people make me laugh when they deny that Ubisoft inputted the free masons into their game.

GeneralTrumbo
04-07-2012, 09:00 AM
http://savannaenvironment.files.wordpress.com/2008/04/acacia.jpg

Looks like the acacia tree to me.

PhonedZero
04-07-2012, 01:43 PM
Wow...great find. This is why people make me laugh when they deny that Ubisoft inputted the free masons into their game.

Thanks, not suprised that no-one has picked up on this yet!

MoneyForBoobs
04-07-2012, 09:59 PM
nice find

LightRey
04-07-2012, 10:03 PM
http://i1196.photobucket.com/albums/aa406/phonedzero/broken-1.jpg

memory seven, not sure if this is also supposed an acacia tree or not, another popular Masonic symbol.

Seems odd to devote a room to this obscure reference. Although the person who formalized the broken column as a Masonic symbol was Jeremy Cross, possibly a cryptic reference to Daniel Cross. Abstergo Subject #4?
I wouldn't be surprised if these symbols were not Masonic by origin as that is the case with most symbols popular in Freemasonry. I'd look it up right now, but I'm extremely tired.

JCearlyyears
04-07-2012, 10:25 PM
I thought that this room seemed awkward.

PhonedZero
04-08-2012, 04:08 AM
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I wouldn't be surprised if these symbols were not Masonic by origin as that is the case with most symbols popular in Freemasonry. I'd look it up right now, but I'm extremely tired.

We Freemasons are certainly not bashful about borrowing symbols from other societies. However the combination of the column and the acacia tree, imo, can only be referencing some kind of Masonic connection/inference. Why here, in this room?

From the Grand Lodge of BC and Y, this is the summary of text from an article printed in 1922.

http://freemasonry.bcy.ca/symbolism/broken_column.html

snip
The claim of Cross to having originated the emblem is, however, disputed. Oliver speaks of the monument but does not assign to it an American origin and the idea itself is very old. In the Barney ritual of 1817, formerly in the possession of Samuel Wilson of Vermont, which was the work adopted by the Grand Lodge of Iowa in 1860, there is the marble column, the beautiful virgin weeping, the open book, the Sprig of Acacia, the urn, and Time standing behind. The only part lacking is the Broken Column and the words referring to this were added later. Samuel Wilson says: "Previous to 1826, but the date or cir****tances of their getting in I cannot recall." Thus it would seem that everything in the present emblem except the reference to the Broken Column was in use prior to the publication of Cross's Work and in fact the emblem in somewhat different form is frequently found in ancient symbolism.
With the Jews the column symbolized the princes, rulers or nobles, and a broken column denoted that a pillar of the state had fallen.
In Egyptian mythology Isis is sometimes pictured weeping over the broken column which conceals the body of her husband while behind her stands Horus or Time pouring ambrosia on her hair.
In Hastings' Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics, Isis is said to be sometimes represented standing. In her right hand is sistrum, in her left a small ewer and on her forehead is a lotus, emblem of the resurrection.
In the Dionysiac Mysteries Dionysius is represented as slain, Rhea goes in search of the body. She finds it and causes it to be buried in due form. She is sometimes represented as standing by a column holding in her hand a sprig of wheat, emblem of immortality, since though it be placed in the ground and die it springs again into newness of life. She was the wife of Kronus or Time, who may fittingly be represented as standing behind her.
While, therefore, it may be true that Cross gave to the emblem its present form it cannot be said that he gave expression to an entirely new idea. The greater part of it is an adaption rather than an invention.
The Builder Magazine March 1922, Volume VIII, Number 3.


http://freemasonry.bcy.ca/symbolism/origin.html
snip
the acacia to the Mason simply recalls the ad death of the Master, Hiram Abif, and its evergreen nature suggests the idea of a future life; but to the Greek mystic it was the emblem of innocence; by carrying a sprig of acacia upon his person, or invoking the aid of the symbol, he himself was protected against temptation, and his innocence guarded. It is only natural that the ancients should use their symbols to represent an abstract idea, such as innocence, for by their aid they were better able to understand these ideas; we ourselves can see how hard it is for modern philosophers to define abstract ideas without such convenient aid.

Sajn12
04-08-2012, 09:37 AM
Wow, great find, I didn't know that, thank you :)

LightRey
04-08-2012, 09:48 AM
Well I'd say the column makes much sense at in every case it seems to be in some way referring to someone who was in some way brought back from the dead (Jesus, Osiris, etc.). It seems a reflection on S16's situation.

The acadia seems yet another symbol associated with life beyond death, which I think once again is a reference to S16's situation. I do not think these symbols suggest a (direct) Freemason significance to the story, but rather that the one who's responsible for showing these symbols was likely Freemason or fairly knowledgeable of Freemason ritual and symbolism and therefore knew the meanings of these symbols and associated them with each other.

I'd like to point out btw that Cronus (Greek: Kronos) =/= Time. The name was confused with the Greek word for time (chronos) and subsequently people started associating him with Time/Death. Cronus was actually a Titan associated with the harvest. This confusion is the reason Death is often depicted wielding a scythe.

PhonedZero
04-08-2012, 05:45 PM
It just sees to be a long stretch to make a connection, and to what end? I find it odd that a these symbols would be written into the story without a definite result in mind. If ive learned anything over my 30 years of gaming is that nothing is put into a game that doesnt have a very specific reason to be there. For 99% of folks playing this game, you could eliminate that room without affecting the story or anyone being the wiser. The choice to add/keep it, means to me, that some message is being sent, or connection to be established. I wish i could talk to one of the writers of these games, great story telling!

LightRey
04-08-2012, 07:48 PM
It just sees to be a long stretch to make a connection, and to what end? I find it odd that a these symbols would be written into the story without a definite result in mind. If ive learned anything over my 30 years of gaming is that nothing is put into a game that doesnt have a very specific reason to be there. For 99% of folks playing this game, you could eliminate that room without affecting the story or anyone being the wiser. The choice to add/keep it, means to me, that some message is being sent, or connection to be established. I wish i could talk to one of the writers of these games, great story telling!
You've never encountered any easter eggs in a game before?

PhonedZero
04-08-2012, 11:34 PM
Sure, but if this is just an Easter egg, I've never seen one that attempts to smack you in the face like this. The game makes you come through here, its not an accidental find or something you have to seek out. I'm not surprised that most people don't see this as significant, like I said before if you aren't a mason this holds little to no significance what so ever. I agree that some one either involved directly or indirectly withe the craft has added this. To suggest that it is only a 'heads-up' to masons is something I would expect from non masons. If it is supposed to be a signal or something of the like, it is an inappropriate sign. We have much more simpler ways of leaving our mark, with a much clearer message than this one.

I could be way off but if this DLC, is all about S16, and giving us a bit more of his back story, could it be that he was a Freemason. I mean it seems only natural that as we bring the story into the modern era. Groups like the assassins and templars had to adopt a more genial face for society to allow them to exist. I could certainly see the transition of the templars to freemasons once they hit the Americas. It would have been a great way to hide in plain sight. Also provides an explanation as to why the fight is coming to america.