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View Full Version : Is anyone else curious as to what most of the characters in ACIII will sound like?



jzsnyder
04-01-2012, 06:30 PM
I'm wondering what kind of accent George Washington will have. Considering we have no audio recordings of him (duh), I'm curious to see how Ubisoft will make most of the patriots sound. In the trailer, nobody has an apparent British accent, as one would expect. So, what kind of accents should we expect to hear from the patriots in the full game?

rileypoole1234
04-01-2012, 06:45 PM
Well if I'm not mistaken the British accent really used to sound like an American southern accent, and evolved through time to sound as it does today, so I hope that at least some of the characters have a southern accent.

That may be completely wrong.

SixKeys
04-01-2012, 07:22 PM
In AC1 though, everyone in Acre who was British spoke with a British accent as we know it today.

D.I.D.
04-01-2012, 07:37 PM
Well if I'm not mistaken the British accent really used to sound like an American southern accent, and evolved through time to sound as it does today, so I hope that at least some of the characters have a southern accent.

That may be completely wrong.

I've seen people try and claim this, but I don't think it's remotely true.

For one thing, that accent would have to survive in England, and it doesn't. Secondly, when you know that the US accent is an amalgamation of Dutch, Irish and Scottish in varying measures, you can hear it and pick it apart pretty clearly. Polish and German feed more into certain Midwest accents due to high concentrations of Polish and German Settlers. In Canada, you hear an especially high degree of Scottish tones in the modified American accent there, and again that's borne out in the history of migration.

[edit] Besides, you should know this as an Englishman - the "British accent" doesn't exist. We've got easily a hundred accents, despite all of the ease of movement we have nowadays. The southern US dialect is the most powerfully distinct of all US accents, so there's no way we spoke like that in the 1600-1700s. That's something which developed over there.

kriegerdesgottes
04-01-2012, 07:45 PM
Well if I'm not mistaken the British accent really used to sound like an American southern accent, and evolved through time to sound as it does today, so I hope that at least some of the characters have a southern accent.

That may be completely wrong.

I have heard this theory before as well and I find it a little hard to buy myself but the truth is no one really knows exactly how they spoke at the time. The English had been on the continent for about 170 years at this point so certainly they had already kind of established themselves as their own people and I truly believe that they saw it that way and that was the whole point of the Declaration was to embody the general feeling of the colonials and let the crown know that they no longer felt they were part of the British crown and that they were their own free, independent people. I am however super curious about what they sounded like at the time compared to typical British people in London.

D.I.D.
04-01-2012, 07:58 PM
I have heard this theory before as well and I find it a little hard to buy myself but the truth is no one really knows exactly how they spoke at the time. The English had been on the continent for about 170 years at this point so certainly they had already kind of established themselves as their own people and I truly believe that they saw it that way and that was the whole point of the Declaration was to embody the general feeling of the colonials and let the crown know that they no longer felt they were part of the British crown and that they were their own free, independent people. I am however super curious about what they sounded like at the time compared to typical British people in London.

Something that helps is looking at poetry and songs from the period, and examining the rhymes. Sometimes things don't match up due to sloppy writing in prose, but sometimes it reveals important details that can point to something significant.

I wouldn't expect the colonials to sound radically different to the people of their homelands, even after 170 years, but without regions to preserve distinct accents the English speakers would probably end up with a blend of all kinds of British accents by that time.

kriegerdesgottes
04-01-2012, 08:03 PM
Something that helps is looking at poetry and songs from the period, and examining the rhymes. Sometimes things don't match up due to sloppy writing in prose, but sometimes it reveals important details that can point to something significant.

I wouldn't expect the colonials to sound radically different to the people of their homelands, even after 170 years, but without regions to preserve distinct accents the English speakers would probably end up with a blend of all kinds of British accents by that time.

Yeah that is probably true. It def may have been similar but I can't help but believe that it had changed to some degree already. Even Corey May said when they were investigating it, they read that they would go from a Virginia dialect to something else which of course is not helpful lol. So I would say they probably didn't speak exactly like the typical British person but I imagine it was probably closer than how we speak today.

mattscat16
04-01-2012, 10:23 PM
they will have an american accent, because England changed the way they spoke in 1740, i believe, from what we know as " the american accent" into " the british accent. Many people were in the colonies by then so they didn't adopt it and we stayed the same. At least I think thats it .

brick177
04-01-2012, 10:29 PM
For the whole thing go here: http://pandora.cii.wwu.edu/vajda/ling201/test3materials/AmericanDialects.htm But the condensed version is this:

The main dialect areas of the US can be traced to the four main migrations of English speaking people to America from the British Isles during the colonial period (1607-1775).


1. From 1629-1640 Puritan religious dissenters fleeing oppression from Charles I fled East Anglia and brought their distinctive twang (a sort of "flat sounding" nasal lengthening of vowels) to Massachusetts. The extreme conservatism and nostalgia for England helped maintain this dialect while the language of East Anglia changed (speech similar to New England can still be found in East Anglia. Today the 16 million or so descendants of the Puritans and many of their neighbors speak some form of this East Anglia derived speech.


2. From 1642-1675 the Royalists, also called Cavaliers, fled from the south and southwest England with their indentured servants and settled in Virginia when the English Civil War against Charles I began. They brought with them their south England drawl (a drawing out of the vowels); they also brought such phrases as aksed (instead of asked), and ain't (instead of isn't). Royalists later settled the Carolinas as well. Southern English speech laid the foundation for the development of American Tidewater speech, or Coastal Southern English.


3. From 1675-1725 the Quakers, or Society of Friends, migrated from the north midlands of England and Wales to the Delaware valley. Their speechways--mixed with those of later German and Swedish immigrants--gave rise to the distinctive band of dialects spoken in parts of Pennsylvania and New Jersey.


4. From 1718-1775 English speakers left North Britain and Northern Ireland and settled in the Appalachian backcountry. These people are called the "Scots-Irish." These were mostly Anglo-Saxons refugees of the Norman Conquest who had settled within the Celtic fringe of Britain. The true Scottish and Irish people were Celts who spoke Scots-Gaelic or its close relative Irish-Gaelic and most did not adopt English until the 18th or 19th century. The immigration of true Irish and Scottish peoples, beginning in the mid-1800's, had little permanent effect on American dialect formation.


One island of early Scotch-Irish English speech was left behind and preserved during the push west. This special, archaic variety of English is known as Appalachian English. It preserves many archaic features that date back to earlier stages in the development of English in Britain. Forms thought to be substandard today are actually the outmoded standard of yesterday. A good example is the use of double negatives such as 'not nobody.' Linguists have dubbed this variety of English as "American Old English" or "American Anglo Saxon". Other mountainous, relatively isolated areas of the American East show a similar preservation of archaic speech. Mario Pei, a popular writer on linguistics, said that "The speech of the Ozarks comes closer to Elizabethan English in many ways than the speech of modern London."

BBALive
04-01-2012, 11:19 PM
Around the time, American and British accents hadn't yet diverged, so they'll likely sound more American to us, but at the time, it would be considered a British accent. So it's actually the British accent that has changed drastically over time, whereas the 'American' accent has remained mostly the same. In short, Americans of today speak with the British accent of the 18th century. However, since the game takes place in Boston and New York, two of the places that adopted the non-rhotic accent that developed in Southern England and spread throughout the country. So we may hear multiple different accents throughout the game, both rhotic and non-rhotic, some sounding similar to the American accents of today, and some sounding similar to the British accents of today.

Jamison_J_B
04-02-2012, 01:58 AM
I'm wondering what kind of accent George Washington will have. Considering we have no audio recordings of him (duh), I'm curious to see how Ubisoft will make most of the patriots sound. In the trailer, nobody has an apparent British accent, as one would expect. So, what kind of accents should we expect to hear from the patriots in the full game?

Wasn't the audio for Washington's character used in the trailer?

American southern accents are extremely easy to denote, I live in the midwest and I hear a clear distinction. However, you might be interested: most people from Texas don't have much of a southern accent, to find that, you would be looking toward Georgia and Alabama.

Also, what is the story behind you brits changing the sound of your accents?

UrDeviant1
04-02-2012, 01:59 AM
Also, what is the story behind you brits changing the sound of your accents?

It's how we roll :cool:

iNEEDSmeINSIDES
04-02-2012, 08:52 AM
No doubt British accents have changed over the years but where on earth has the theory come from that we used to talk with what is now considered to be an American accent and we one day decided to change our accents but Colonists didn't?

Surely the most likely place for a change in accents to have occurred is a place where lots of people form different regions and countries settle and start living togther?!

If you look(or listen) to other British Colonies they tend to talk English with something approaching a Queen's English accent not a current American accent (or apparently an old British Accent).

Also North Britain is a horrible phrase, just call it Scotland. I know it came from that article and not the poster themselves.

Anyways, I think the characters accents will comprise of a variety regional English accents, Irish, Scottish, French, possibly Dutch and German and they will through in a couple of American accents for good measure.

Captain Tomatoz
04-02-2012, 10:47 AM
What is the 'British accent' because the accents in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales are completely different. Not to mention the many, completely different, accents in England.

iNEEDSmeINSIDES
04-02-2012, 11:17 AM
What is the 'British accent' because the accents in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales are completely different. Not to mention the many, completely different, accents in England.

Definately, I tried to use plural as much as possible and not refer to a singular British Accent.

freddie_1897
04-02-2012, 11:18 AM
Don't worry Americans, we don't all sound like Cheryl cole, you will be able to understand what were saying

iNEEDSmeINSIDES
04-02-2012, 11:46 AM
Or Jamie Oliver.

There is always the subtitles I guess.

D.I.D.
04-02-2012, 11:47 AM
they will have an american accent, because England changed the way they spoke in 1740, i believe, from what we know as " the american accent" into " the british accent. Many people were in the colonies by then so they didn't adopt it and we stayed the same. At least I think thats it .

Have you travelled in the UK? You can travel 20 miles and be in a place with a different accent to the one you left.

There's also something about the power of accents - some have a heavier strength that others. I don't mean just in the sound, but in resilience. For example, people settle in a new place and their accent might be so ingrained that it doesn't change at all, but some will bend towards the host location - to the point that the newcomer sounds weird to their friends back home. The central London accents are like that. Only in the last 20 years have we seen any challenge to those accents: one, an Essex-tinged accent and the other a traditional London accent with heavily modified vowel sounds. There are accents which are deemed to have 'disappeared', such as the extremely clipped tone of upper-class UK film actors of the 1930s and 1940s, but in truth those accents were already somewhat rare, and they are still around. It's just that this social class isn't the public face of society anymore.

If the American accent was really the thing in 17th and 18th century England, it would have to have been very widespread (in order for the majority of US settlers to have had that accent), and there would have to be some pockets of it remaining today. American accents are pretty powerful. Of all the people I know who have emigrated to the US, very few have kept their original vocal sound. They've gravitated to varying degrees towards the local accent, whether it's something small such as pronouncing all "t"s as "d"s or a more significant swing.

It's true that we've only got the history of audio recording to go on for solid proof, but then we've also got personal memories. Whenever there's a small change in accents - the emergence of "upspeak", which hit the UK through the popularity of Australian soap operas in the 80s, or the flattened vowels of inner London's under-30s (a recycling of a recycling of Afro-Caribbean accents combined with London's own) - people note it in writing. You see hundreds of mentions in journals, newspapers and fiction. I have never seen any written record of somebody noting that "these Americans speak with a dead accent which my grandfather used", or something of that nature.

The one interesting thing is in singing. It takes a huge amount of concentration to sing in most British accents without going off-pitch or unbalanced in volume, whereas it's much easier to sing in an American accent. Most contemporary British singers do sing in either a halfway or fully American accent now, almost by default, unless they're trying to make some kind of point about their Britishness.

BBALive
04-02-2012, 02:13 PM
When people say "British accent" or "English accent" they're referring to the general English accent.

UrDeviant1
04-02-2012, 02:29 PM
When people say "British accent" or "English accent" they're referring to the general English accent.

The "general" English accent being what?

iNEEDSmeINSIDES
04-02-2012, 02:32 PM
The "general" English accent being what?

Hugh Grant.

UrDeviant1
04-02-2012, 02:35 PM
Hugh Grant.

Ugh, can't stand that guy.

Captain Tomatoz
04-02-2012, 02:41 PM
When people say "British accent" or "English accent" they're referring to the general English accent.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8a/English_Dialects_of_the_British_Isles.pngI don't see a 'general English accent'

UrDeviant1
04-02-2012, 02:44 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8a/English_Dialects_of_the_British_Isles.pngI don't see no 'general English accent'

This was my point.

iNEEDSmeINSIDES
04-02-2012, 02:49 PM
Bloody hell, we English ain't half pedants.

UrDeviant1
04-02-2012, 02:52 PM
Bloody hell, we Englist ain't half pedants.

I think It was a good point to make.

SixKeys
04-02-2012, 03:50 PM
The same can be said about every country. There is no "German accent", "French accent" or "American accent" either.

LightRey
04-02-2012, 04:12 PM
The same can be said about every country. There is no "German accent", "French accent" or "American accent" either.
There are strong similarities though. I mean, it's easily distinguishable by their accent whether someone's from Germany or Switzerland for example. The same goes for the Netherlands and Belgium, or The US and England, or England and Scotland, etc.

UrDeviant1
04-02-2012, 04:24 PM
The same can be said about every country. There is no "German accent", "French accent" or "American accent" either.

It was more a point of someone referring to the English or "Hugh Grant" accent as the general accent of Britain. Britain Is a nation split up Into 4 Independent Countries, each with their own accents and some with their own language. It's a bit different to saying there Is no German/French/American accent. It's no biggie though, It's not something I necessarily feel strongly about. Just sayin' ;)

Edit: I should correct that, England,Wales,Scotland,Northern Ireland are not exactly Independent. My mistake :D

kriegerdesgottes
04-02-2012, 04:24 PM
This was my point.

It all sounds the same to me.

UrDeviant1
04-02-2012, 04:28 PM
It all sounds the same to me.

hahahah

albertwesker22
04-02-2012, 05:59 PM
It all sounds the same to me.

No it doesn't. In the magical world of Hollywood maybe :rolleyes:

RzaRecta357
04-02-2012, 06:38 PM
I've posted this before but... This is what Conner will sound like..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NQdpNBZA0k

kriegerdesgottes
04-02-2012, 06:38 PM
No it doesn't. In the magical world of Hollywood maybe :rolleyes:

haha that could be.

tarrero
04-02-2012, 07:16 PM
It is not my intention to be offensive, but aside from the southern accent, all the americans sound pretty similar to me, I am from Spain, so I guess many of the American characters will have some "bostonian" accent,

How accurate would that be?

kriegerdesgottes
04-02-2012, 07:24 PM
It is not my intention to be offensive, but aside from the southern accent, all the americans sound pretty similar to me, I am from Spain, so I guess many of the American characters will have some "bostonian" accent,

How accurate would that be?

Well Boston has its own unique accentthat is similar(to me anyway) to the New York accent but it's nothing like the southern accent. And yeah I don't blame you for not hearing a different since you're from Spain. I can't say if that is what they would have spoken back then because the truth of the matter is, no one is quite sure exactly what they sounded like at the time.

brick177
04-03-2012, 01:52 AM
I've posted this on a different thread about a similar topic. But this HBO miniseries was very accurately done. Here are the representatives from all the colonies voting on the Declaration of Independence and you can hear their various colonial accents and the similarities it they still had with English accents.


http://youtu.be/nrvpZxMfKaU