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bhunter2112
05-03-2004, 11:03 PM
I am reading john Toland's (won pulitzer prize for the book) The rising sun, the decline and fall of the Jpanese empire 1936-1945. 950+ pages. I recommend the book highly. It gives a very detailed (but not to detailed) account of the war in the pacific from begining to the end. The book has a dozen maps of some of the more interesting engagements.
I got the book to get ready for the PF game. I enjoy making historically accurate missions in the full mission builder. It will help a lot. I also have Ospreys "aircraft of the aces" double volume of navy and army aces of japan. I am all set !

bhunter2112
05-03-2004, 11:03 PM
I am reading john Toland's (won pulitzer prize for the book) The rising sun, the decline and fall of the Jpanese empire 1936-1945. 950+ pages. I recommend the book highly. It gives a very detailed (but not to detailed) account of the war in the pacific from begining to the end. The book has a dozen maps of some of the more interesting engagements.
I got the book to get ready for the PF game. I enjoy making historically accurate missions in the full mission builder. It will help a lot. I also have Ospreys "aircraft of the aces" double volume of navy and army aces of japan. I am all set !

Capt._Tenneal
05-03-2004, 11:16 PM
I've read Toland's book several times myself. Although not strictly an operational history of the Pacific War (it has a lot of human interest stories), it does give a fairly good picture. I also like his narrative style -- sort of like reading a novel, instead of a straight analysis that reads like an essay or college term paper.

The book also goes into several lesser-known events preceding the Pacific War, like the young officer's revolt and attempted coup in 1936, was it ? And it closes out with another officers attempted coup in 1945, when they tried to take the Emperor hostage so he can not broadcast the surrender message.

bhunter2112
05-03-2004, 11:34 PM
I am up to early 43 in the book. The japaese really should have tried to sue for an acceptable peace in the early stages of the war. It was obvious that they could not win.

Art-J
05-06-2004, 04:53 PM
Obvious for us, today, when we know what the outcome was. But if you had lived there, in those times, in Japan, you would have been probably assassinated for saying things like that... Logical thinking was not no.1 in the country governed by the army since early thirties. That was a black and sad card in Japan's history indeed

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SkyChimp
05-06-2004, 05:22 PM
Excellent book!

Regards,
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