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View Full Version : I really, really like the Hurricane



TAW_Oilburner
12-21-2005, 09:06 PM
Especially the IIB. Except for the glass chin it is quite a nice ride and way more capable than I once thought. Definately worth spending some time in if you haven't yet http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

TAW_Oilburner
12-21-2005, 09:06 PM
Especially the IIB. Except for the glass chin it is quite a nice ride and way more capable than I once thought. Definately worth spending some time in if you haven't yet http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

wayno7777
12-21-2005, 09:07 PM
Was my favorite ride in EAW....

HotelBushranger
12-21-2005, 09:09 PM
I had a dream last night about flying a Hawker Hind and chopping up some poor G.50 on OnlineMT map. This game is really getting to me...

wayno7777
12-21-2005, 09:10 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

neural_dream
12-21-2005, 09:12 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by TAW_Oilburner:
Especially the IIB. Except for the glass chin it is quite a nice ride and way more capable than I once thought. Definately worth spending some time in if you haven't yet http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Then you may care think about this scenario http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/3341094983 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif.

danjama
12-21-2005, 09:15 PM
IIC is nice, if only for the hispanos. Nice solid plane, poor in terms of climb, but ok otherwise. I dream about flying alot, in fact, i go to sleep replaying the nights action in my mind. Sad, no! Im just in love... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

huggy87
12-21-2005, 09:42 PM
It is a very stable gun platform, an attribute that is often underrated.

BuzzU
12-21-2005, 09:55 PM
One of the easiest planes to fly. A few hundred more HP would have been nice.

msalama
12-22-2005, 12:45 AM
Hurricane is a very stable gun platform and a nice flyer, albeit somewhat anemic in the HP department just as Buzz said. But it does manouvre very well in the defensive if you * know how to handle it!

And it looks spiffy as well http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif So all in all a dashing aeroplane for a gentleman connoisseur, isn't it?

* Not me.

Lt.Davis
12-22-2005, 01:08 AM
I'm using Paul's DCG to creat a multiplayer mission, Bf109-E vs Hurri... 4 of us (human player) not to say very good in skills, but rather quiet experience in Bf-109. When DF started all within 10 minutes being shot down by 8x hurricanes.

We don't really believe it and refly the mission. Again within 10 minutes we are all bail out or burn inside the plane like no body business.

Until we try the 4th time, all of us survive but 3 of us have some damage, we manage to down 3 hurri and the rest of the AI Hurri i think is out of ammo and RTB.

From that day onwards, everytime when i spot hurri i'll put more attention to it. Yes it's my 1st most fear enemy in the sky now so far.

NAFP_supah
12-22-2005, 01:16 AM
Flying the Ki-43 the hurricane is one of the planes I really fear. Those twelf .303's have a sort of shotgun effect making it REALLY hard to stay out of their cone of fire which is easier with more accurate guns. In the Ki-43 every hit hits something important because of its 0 armor.

HART_dreyer
12-22-2005, 01:34 AM
If you are flying a 109 you have little to fear from a Hurricane. It's just way too slow to pose a big threat.

msalama
12-22-2005, 02:49 AM
Yeah, if you are flying the Biffer WELL, and the Hurri driver doesn't know how to behave him/herself! Because hey, the raw speed difference isn't everything...

Kapteeni
12-22-2005, 03:13 AM
Me loves Hurricane IIB too! Been playing Loweringens DGEN Leningrad 1941 campaign now about 3 nights (Finnish against soviets). And i love my IIB. In Real, finnish pilots didnt like Hurricane (they had earlier versions), but in game its great. Very stable. BTW It was my second plastic model way back in 70 or 71.

mortoma
12-22-2005, 09:08 AM
The real life Hurricane is the opposite of the one we have in this sim. Very unstable and a handfull to fly. This is from reading several accounts of pilots who fly antique Hurris in modern times at airshows and the like. The pitch axis is especially unstable. One pilot describes it as a difficult aircraft to fly formation in. Ours is so easy to fly is amazing.

There are a lot of planes in this sim that are far too easy to fly compared to the real life counterpart. The P-40 is another striking example. Those of us who can easily fly it in this sim would likely get killed if we were to attempt even a take off in the real P-40. That would likely even include myself and I'm a real pilot with a taildragger endorsement. I would take as much as a year slowly getting experience in more powerful, complex and torquier planes before even attempting a warbird.

Prof.Lokovich
12-22-2005, 09:45 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NAFP_supah:
Flying the Ki-43 the hurricane is one of the planes I really fear. Those twelf .303's have a sort of shotgun effect making it REALLY hard to stay out of their cone of fire which is easier with more accurate guns. In the Ki-43 every hit hits something important because of its 0 armor. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, I have the same problem.

JtD
12-22-2005, 09:58 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HART_dreyer:
If you are flying a 109 you have little to fear from a Hurricane. It's just way too slow to pose a big threat. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Guess you never had to deal with a Hurricane flying at 20000+ ft.

carguy_
12-22-2005, 10:08 AM
All post `41 models are very nice,especially the field mod.When I fly the Hurricane I`d like the P51 to have same stability at high speed.The elevator authority is supoerior so ay 450kph there aren`t many planes that can handle you on their 6.You can do a full 360 very very quickly and have full control plus very much energy left.

For a wooden plane,the Hurric`n acts quite optimistically @high G maneuvers.

You need to be fast.Turnrate,firepower,stability and toughness are there.


And overrev causes no damage to the engine http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/354.gif

Vipez-
12-22-2005, 11:04 AM
I think you also would have liked Hurri in FB 1.0 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Jetbuff
12-22-2005, 11:05 AM
You are not alone... the Hurri is a beauty. And don't listen to Vipez, the FB1.0 hurricane had no soul.

Banger2004
12-22-2005, 12:56 PM
Usually fly mk8 Spit, especially online, but when BoB turns up I'll be getting in a few hours on the wonderful Hurri, sooooooo smooth.

Not so sure about mortoma's observation about the aircraft handling, and of course I accept that the pilots flying current Hurricanes have real experience of type, but I'm sure I've seen and read several accounts in the past of ww2 pilots praising the Hurris stability and ease of operation.

Badsight.
12-22-2005, 01:15 PM
the Hurricane

best foward view for deflection shooting in the whole game (well , along with the P-38)

because of this i have managed to score 7 Emils in one sortie using the IIc . i really really like Emil versus Hurricane (any models) DF maps

danjama
12-22-2005, 01:18 PM
Someone posted this link once, of a guys website who flys warbirds at Airshows. He wrote reviews of the planes he flew and the Hurricane one he wrote was very interesting. To put it mildly, he said he feared flying the Hurricane, and he found it hard work, albeit rewarding. **** i wish i could find that link, but it was a long time back that it was posted http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

ploughman
12-22-2005, 02:40 PM
I remember that, he thought the Hurricane was horrible.

berg417448
12-22-2005, 02:43 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by danjama:
Someone posted this link once, of a guys website who flys warbirds at Airshows. He wrote reviews of the planes he flew and the Hurricane one he wrote was very interesting. To put it mildly, he said he feared flying the Hurricane, and he found it hard work, albeit rewarding. **** i wish i could find that link, but it was a long time back that it was posted http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


This one?:

http://www.avweb.com/news/columns/185849-1.html

danjama
12-22-2005, 02:56 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by danjama:
Someone posted this link once, of a guys website who flys warbirds at Airshows. He wrote reviews of the planes he flew and the Hurricane one he wrote was very interesting. To put it mildly, he said he feared flying the Hurricane, and he found it hard work, albeit rewarding. **** i wish i could find that link, but it was a long time back that it was posted http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


This one?:

http://www.avweb.com/news/columns/185849-1.html </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

aye thats the one. Everyone read his opinion i thought it was interesting and inciteful. Thanls for link, bookmarked now!

reverendkrv1972
12-22-2005, 03:01 PM
Hurri is one of my favourite aircraft...I have to admit I love her.

I havent flown much lately but,I had one session a while back online & had a few kills under my belt,got half of one of my wings blown off,proceeded to shoot another 2 enemy down whilst on my way to land http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I read that article a while back & found it quite upsetting considering everything else I had read about the Hurri.

overall a quality ride that has bags of character & is rewarding to fly,even if she is underrated(unfairly imho)

regards,

Rev

ploughman
12-22-2005, 03:05 PM
I did find it curious as it seemed to chime against everything I'd read about the Hurricane, it's stability, etc. But then he was flying one!

SlickStick
12-22-2005, 03:08 PM
If its a '41 plane set, I still choose the Mk IIc first. I love the Hurricane Mk. IIs! The thing that the game doesn't seem to translate well is the size of the Hurricane II series. It's actually a rather big plane.

http://img432.imageshack.us/img432/7803/00246hurri0sv.jpg

(edit: Forgot about the current "109-G2" being a '42 plane, lol.)

VV_Holdenb
12-22-2005, 04:12 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif Hurri fan club - http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
My ride of choice. As said already: needs
a bit more horse power through.

Low_Flyer_MkII
12-22-2005, 06:31 PM
Here's a few passages from an excellent first hand account of flying the Hurri during the battle of France.

Not the first time I've posted it, but hope some of you find it interesting. The book is widely available in paperback in the U.K.



Posted 26.October.2003 14:54
Just been reading, thought some of you might find it interesting...
(That's a 'u' in P*ssy BTW - I appear to have been censored )
.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

AN INTERESTING POINT ABOUT MUNICH

On arrival at Tangmere I was rather surprised to hear about the flap that had swept through the fighter squadrons during the Munich crisis a few months before. All the 1 Squadron officers had spent a hectic week in the hangers with the aircraftsmen spraying camouflage paint on the brilliant silver aircraft. The troops had belted ammunition day and night. And the CO of 1 Squadron (which was equipped with obsolete Hawker Fury biplanes carrying two slow-firing machine-guns and capable of a top speed of 220 mph) had announced to his startled pilots: "Gentlemen, our aircraft are too slow to catch the German bombers: we must ram them."

Fortunately for the RAF, England and the world, Mr Chamberlain managed to stave off war for a year. That vital year gave the RAF time to re-equip the regular fighter squadrons with Hurricanes and Spitfires armed with eight rapid-firing machine-guns and capable of an average top speed of 320 mph.


.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

FORMATION PRACTICE

Soon we were in our cockpits, most of us in shirtsleeves in the heat. Engine after engine burst into life and was run up by its pilot. The Bull's order came clearly over thre R/T: "Come on, we're off! We're off!" He taxied past, followed by Hilly Brown and Leslie Clisby, who formed his section of three. Then came Johhny Walker,P*ssy Palmer and sergeant soper, the Red Section of "A" Flight, followed by Prosser Hanks, myself and Stratton, the Yellow Section. Next came "B" Flight - Leak Crusoe, Boy Mould, Sergeant Berry (Blue Section), and Billy Drake, Sergeant Clowes and Sergeant Albonico (Green Section).

The fifteen Hurricanes move forward together with a deep roar, slowly at first, then gathering speed. Tails come up, and controls get more feel. Bump-bump-bump. Almost off. A bit frightening, this take off. We fly! No...down we come again. Bump...Blast! Must have been a down-draught...Hold it! We're off now - straight over the cliff edge 400 feet above the sea. I see Prosser shut his eyes in mock terror. It is an odd feeling. As usual, I start to talk to myself. Wheels up. Keep in. Stick between knees. Come on, bloody wheels! Dropping behind a bit. Open your throttle! More! Wide! Ah, there are the two pretty red lights: the wheels are locked up. Now get in closer, for God's sake! The Bull's giving it too much throttle, blast him! Anyway - I'm tucked in now. That's fine.

"Sections astern - Sections astern - Go!" over the R/T from the bull. Back drops my section of three, a little left and underneath. Don't waffle, P*ssy, or I'll chew up your tail! Up we climb. Phew, it's hot! But I'll bet it looks nice. Hope so anyway.

Out we go over the sea. Flying south I think. Yes, there's the far side of the Seinne. "Turning right - turning right a fraction!" from the Bull. Round and out to sea again. Keep below Prosser in the turn - that's right. Hell, the sun's bloody bright! I can't see Prosser's wing when he's above me in the turn. Don't hit him! Watch his tailplane! The Bull again: "Coming out - coming out!" We straighten. Ah, that's better - I can see now. And the Bull once more: "For Number 5 Attack - Deploy - Go! Sections-line-astern - Go! Number 5 Attack - Go!"

Open out a bit. There goes Johnny. Now P*ssy. Soper. Prosser next. Now me. Down I go. Watch "B" Z Flight and synchronize with them. Pull up now. Fire! Break away quickly. Roll right over and down to the right. Rejoin. Where's Prosser got to? Can't see a bloody thing. Ah, there he is, up there. Full throttle! Up - up - cut the corner. Here we come behind him. Throttle back or you'll pass him. And there we are again, back in line-astern.

Prosser's waggling his wings. That means form Vic. "Re-form! - Re-form!" from the Bull. "Turning right now!" Towards Havre? Yes, there it is dead ahead. "Sections-echelon-starboard - Go!" Right goes my section. Up. Left. Keep in! There, that's nice, really nice. The whole squadron is now in Vics of three aircraft and the five Vics are echeloned to starboard. now, fingers out please 1 Squadron. Hope we don't overshoot. No, here we go. "Peel off - peel off - Go!" says the bull. His section banks left in formation beyond the vertical and disappears below. Johnny's section follows. Don't watch them - keep your eyes glued to Prosser. Here goes my section now. Down, down we dive in tight Vic, turning slightly left. Keep in - tucked right in! Stratton is OK the other side of Prosser. Right a bit. The controls are bloody stiff - must be doing a good 400. Flattening out now. Don't waffle! There goes the harbour. Buildings flashing by. We're nice and low. Keep in! Hold It! Pulling up now - up - over the rise - over the airfield now. Down we go again - just to make the Frogs lie down. Up over the trees - just! Round and back again. Good fun, this. Bet they're enjoying the show down there. I am! Here we go again, skimming the grass and heading straight for the trees. Pull up - up come our noses and we just clear them. Prosser's waving his hand. Break away! There goes Stratton's belly - away we go, nicely timed in a Prince of Wales, and I'm in my own.

What now? God, I feel ill! Let's give the old girl a last shake-up. What about an upward roll? Good idea - but watch the others - the air's full of flying bodies! Let's climb. Down in that clear space. Need some space for this. 300-350-360. That's enough. Adjust the tailwheel. Now back with the stick. Gently Up - up - a touch harder now. Horizon gone - look out along the wing. Wait till she's vertical - now look up. Stick central, now over to the right of the cockpit. Round she goes. Stop. Back with the stick. Look back. There's the horizon, upside down - stick forward - now over to the left - and out we roll. Not bad. Oh my god, I'm going to be sick...

Better land. Throttle right back. Slow down to 160 mph. Wheels down. Now flaps. Turn in now. Open the hood. Hold speed at 90. Tailwheel right back. Over the boundary. Hold off a fraction. Sink, sink - right back now with the stick. Bump, rumble, rumble, rumble - fine. No brakes - plenty of room. Tiny bit heavy that one. Not quite right. Oh well. Taxi in - run the petrol out of the carburettor, switch off ignition, brakes off, undo safety and parachute harness and jump out.

I stroll across to join the other pilots. Prosser fixes me with his characteristic dead-pan look.
"You just missed a steeple when we were beating-up Havre, Paul," he says casually.
"Did I?" Equally casual. "Glad I didn't see it!"

.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

CONVERGEANCE SETTINGS

A few days later an air marshall from the Air Ministery paid us a visit. He had come, he told us, to find out out why we had shot down every aircraft we had attacked while the Fighter Command squadrons in England were, in the main, only succeeding in "driving the German aircraft off in an easterly direction", as the communiques delicately phrased it.

Since we were no longer under the jurisdiction of Fighter Command we had no hesitation in telling the air marshall the reason.

All single-seat eight-gun squadrons in Fighter Command - both Hurricanes and Spitfires - had very poor practice shooting results before the outbreak of war. We all used the "Dowding Spread" at that time - a method of gun-harmonization laid down in accordance with the conviction of our Commander-in-Cheif, Air Marshall Sir Hugh Dowding, that his fighters would never see, let alone engage, enemy fighters.

In theory the Dowding Spread, which was worked out for shooting at enemy bombers from astern, seemed a good idea. Used against a big target, theoretically it produced a wide enough bullet pattern to compensate for aiming error and left sufficient lethal density to destroy such a target. Furthermore, the range laid down - 400 yards - was outside effective enemy defensive fire.

Now we were not armament experts, but we knew about flying and air firing, and we didn't like the Dowding Spread. We reckoned that, even if the experts were right and that at 400 yards' range the bullet velocity was still high enought to prevent tumble, maintain accuracy and penetrate armour (which seemed unlikely), the spread produced by aiming, shooting and random errors combined would be more than enough to drop lethal density below the minimum required for a kill, especially against a small target like a fighter - which WE were not at ALL convinced we would never meet. As for defensive fire from an enemy bomber, we felt his one or two guns hardly stood a chance against the Hurricane's eight. Curiously, the only thing we were wrong about turned out to be this last point.

Fighter Command had dismissed our theories, so during our month's shooting practice in the spring of 1939 we secretly harmonized all our guns on a spot at 250 yards range. Our shooting results on towed air targets showed we were right - we shot them clean away time and time again. Action in France had now proved this point: we had shot down every enemy aircraft we'd attacked.

To the air marshall, and later on to the Air Staff, the case was conclusive. All sigle-seat fighter squadrons were instucted to adopt our method. It was not a moment too soon...

Not long afterwards we made another contribution that was benefit all our fighter squadrons. While still with Fighter Command, in order to facilitate recognition by our observers on the ground the undersides of our wings were painted black on one side, white on the other. We considered this to be idiotic, since the German aircraft were duck-egg blue underneath and very difficult to spot from below, whereas we stood out like flying chequerboards. So the Bull gave orders for the undersides of our aircraft to be painted duck-egg blue, and this too was later adopted for all RAF fighters.

.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

"By the time No.1 Squadron withdrew from France on 18th June 1940, they had gained a formidible combat reputation. Miraculously, they had destroyed a total of 155 enemy aircraft with only three of their own pilots having been killed, two wounded and one captured".

Fighter Pilot: a personal record of the campaign in France 1939-1940
by Paul Richey 1941.
1990 edition published by Leo Cooper.
ISBN 1-85089-550-3
.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

SlickStick
12-22-2005, 08:20 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by VV_Holdenb:
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif Hurri fan club - http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
My ride of choice. As said already: needs
a bit more horse power through. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Agreed. Did they ever make a boosted version of the Hurri II? Or, I guess the Spitfire just took over.

When we got the Mk. Vc Spitfire in-game, I have to admit, having four hispanos on that Spitfire made it a tough choice not to fly it in 1941. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Cool read, LF_MKII. Wow...
"Miraculously, they had destroyed a total of 155 enemy aircraft with only three of their own pilots having been killed, two wounded and one captured."

Now, that's some mighty-fine pilotin' there. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Banger2004
12-23-2005, 04:01 AM
Saw a program on UK television the other week about one of the pilots from No 1 Squadron, Billy Drake. He came across as a wonderfully modest man, who enjoyed flying his Hurricanes. The program took him back to France, where they searched for and excavated the Hurricane he was in when he was shot down, but also told the story of No 1 Squadrons' success at shooting down enemy aircraft. It was a poignant and sobering tale.

It seems that 1 Squadron, because of their early experience in combat were the instigators of a few RAF fighter tactics and aircraft improvements, for instance the CO had a downed German bomber gutted of its armour plating, so that the Hurricans could have protection fitted behind the seat. This act alone saved Billy Drake from almost certain death when he was shot down.

I believe that Billy Drake is the last surviving member of 1 Squadron from the Battle of France period, he went on to become an ace.

For anyone who is interested, this makes for an interesting read:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/ww2/u567081

Also, I have also read the account of the Hurricane flying at

http://www.avweb.com/news/columns/185849-1.html

and I cant help but wonder if that is a hybrid aircraft? I say this because the engine seems to have no real history, the prop mated to it is possibly not the correct model/type, so is it possible that handling etc could be adversly affected? I don't know the answer, and I am certainly not an expert, but does anyone here think it possible that the airframe/engine /prop configuration would be essential to performance?

HART_dreyer
12-23-2005, 04:40 AM
If a Hurricane manages to shoot me down while I'm in a 109 online, I think I'll start to cry.

Badsight.
12-23-2005, 05:58 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HART_dreyer:
If a Hurricane manages to shoot me down while I'm in a 109 online, I think I'll start to cry. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>depends on which 109

the Emil is not the plane it used to be , its performance advantage over the Hurricane used to be really dominating before we got the Ki-61 , after PF came out the Emil was toned down in realtion to how the Hein performed

the Feild Mod Hurri has some really nassty guns & (imo) the Hurri (any model) is a good match up against Emils

Friendly_flyer
12-23-2005, 06:23 AM
In the book "Tally-ho!€ the account of the Norwegian pilots flying for the RAF during the war, the hurricane is described as nice enough to fly, but a bit docile compared to the Spitfire. The old war-bird tested by Deakin may not have been performing at its best. He mentioned that the engine overheats very easily, which does not agree much with wartime reports. It is quite possible that the axis instability may be an artefact of restoration. When taking out old equipment (like guns) and fitting new (like modern electronics) the plane's balance may shift a bit, which I think could do bad thing to the planes balance.

HART_dreyer
12-23-2005, 06:36 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Badsight.:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HART_dreyer:
If a Hurricane manages to shoot me down while I'm in a 109 online, I think I'll start to cry. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>depends on which 109

the Emil is not the plane it used to be , its performance advantage over the Hurricane used to be really dominating before we got the Ki-61 , after PF came out the Emil was toned down in realtion to how the Hein performed

the Feild Mod Hurri has some really nassty guns & (imo) the Hurri (any model) is a good match up against Emils </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hmm, I can't say for sure as I haven't flown the Emil vs Hurricane in sooo long, I used to dominate Hurri's with it without a problem about a year ago however.

The F2/F4 would defineatly outperform the hurricane for sure even in 4.02.

Kernow
12-23-2005, 06:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Ploughman:
I did find it curious as it seemed to chime against everything I'd read about the Hurricane, it's stability, etc. But then he was flying one! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Then again so had Stanford Tuck:

'... its remarkable steadiness and solidness when eight machine guns crashed into life made it an absolute delight to fly.'

'She was steady as a rock, even going fast downhill, and was a very impressive gun platform, having good forward visibility... She hardly shuddered when the eight Brownings blasted off, but it was a different story later when four 20 mm Hispanos were mounted in it...'

I'll take the opinions of those who flew the the real thing at the time.

HotelBushranger
12-23-2005, 08:24 AM
Aye, a lot can happen to an aeroplane in 60 years.

Monty_Thrud
12-23-2005, 08:44 AM
21st June 1941...Bob Stanford Tuck(Fly For Your Life)...Hurricane MkIIc

He had taken off at 1.30 on a routine patrol, flying alone, it was a wide, bright afternoon

and it was good to be back in the dance of the sun. He flew down the coast to Southend

without sighting another aircraft. A year ago this area of sky wouldn't have been empty....!

The passage of time enhances a legend, but the drug repetition can rob a star performer of

his confidence and judgement. Tuck had been on operations for thirteen months without

respite. He was beginning to feel like a prisoner.

Without any conscious decision or plan, he put the stick over and headed straight out to

sea at 1,000 feet. For sixty ,eighty a hundred miles out he flew, swivelling his head around

without pause, all that he saw in the air were a few white feathers of cirrus, high above.

Until the shells came ripping through the cockpit and the engine. And kept coming - a

blazing, thundering jet playing on him.

The Hurricane was quivering and rocking and his earswere hurting with the deafening

clatters and explosions and his body was frozen rigid waiting for the tearing,

bone-splintering blows. Through it all his brain was shrieking hysterically: FOOL,FOOL,FOOL!

He knew now he'd come out here deliberately looking for trouble. A hundred miles from the

coast, no altitude, all alone, perfectly bounced.

This is all the trouble in the world, Robert and it is all yours.

The hellish din of it - can't possibly last another instant, it must stop, NOW! Jesus

God,how much more is coming in? The next one will hit me, the very next shell - i can feel

the place in my back where it'll hit, the flesh is braeking open there already!

God, make it stop: make it stop!

During those few agonising seconds when the shells were hammering into his machine, panic

tried for the stranglehold which would destroy all reason and seal his doom. But Tuck was a

seasoned Fear-fighter. As ever, he hung on, grinding his back teeth, holding back the icy

tide that wanted to burst up from the depth of his belly and flood through him - telling

himself this torture must end in the very next iota of time. The next, the next, the next...

When atlast the din and the shuddering did stop. his mind was instantly clear and his

reflexes were working smoothly and swiftly. A 109 flashed by close underneath him. He put

the stick forward. The sight dropped on to the flat-topped canopy. He checked the

turn-and-bank in the space of a heart's beat and squeezed the button. The Messerschmitt

waggled angrily under the blast of metal. The canopy crumpled like melting cellophane. It

gave itself up to gravity and the deep, dark sea.

The moment he was sure it was going down he threw the Hurri into a steep turn. Somehow he

knew ther were others behind him.

Sure enough, as he banked, bright tubes of tracers burned through the air scant feet beyond

the perspex. He twisted his neck and saw another 109 very close. It had a yellow spinner:

hallmark of a crack squadron. It was travelling too fast to get inside his turn. He let it

go by underneath, slammed the stick over and cartwheelled after it. He hadn't been in a real

'split-a r s e d' dogfight for months - he'd soon discover if the old hound could still bite...!

The German dived to about a hundred feet, went over on his side and pulled right for all he

was worth. Nice flying. Tuck hauled hard and followed. Round and round. The sea was a

flashing vertical wall rushing past his starboard wingtip. The poles span and the sunlight

dimmed. A tremendous pressure on the top of his head and shoulders rammed him down in his

seat. The engine screamed. His eyes ached. The red lines of the gunsight were blurred and

bent.

Then the 109 took of a little of his bank. Tuck followed suit and everything came back into

sharp focus. The Hun was trapped in his sight. They were still in a steep turn, less than

fifty feet off the sea, nevertheless he checked his turn-and-bank needle, and centerd it

with tiny adjustment of the rudder before he fired. Two seconds' worth of 20-mm sent the

Messerschmitt straight into the water. Tuck flew through the plume of spray it raised.
He pulled up quickly, aileroned the opposite way, then throttled back. Immediately he was

hit from the left. The throttle lever was blown out of his hand. The kick of it numbed every

fibre of his left arm, like a high-voltage shock. The reflector plate exploded and a chip of

it embedded itself in his forehead. The hood flew off and a tornado raged in the c0ckpit.

The third German flashed underneath and made a wide circle. The Hurricane's engine was

missing badly and had no throttle, so he couldn't chase it. He just climbed slowly and

watched it come right round and start towards him, head-on. Toe-to-toe stuff now.

The sunlight made the 109's yellow nose shine like a golden bull's eye - an archer's

'gold', he thought with mild, irrational amusement. He hoped there was enough ammo left to

give the b astar d just one good smack in the snout. He was being almost wistful now. In his

heart he was pretty sure this really was the end of the road: the Hurricane just couln't

take anymore punishment. He'd pushed his luck too far this time - this was the dreaded

moment when fortune would desert him.

He'd no sight, but the turn-and-bank was still working. He wiped a trickle of blood from

his left eyebrow and made himself relax.

Charging through the summer sky at a composite speed of around 600, the two fighters

slugged it out for perhaps five or six seconds. Marvellously, the German missed. Tuck's

shells shattered themselves deep amid the whirring steel parts of the Daimler-Benz.

The Messerschmitt made a shaky turn and disappeared eastwards in a shallow dive, bleeding

glycol. The German didn't have many miles to go - he'd probably make the coast all right.

Tuck knew he'd never make his...

http://premium1.uploadit.org/bsamania//bbmf_05_1024.jpg

Aaron_GT
12-23-2005, 09:58 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">The real life Hurricane is the opposite of the one we have in this sim. Very unstable and a handfull to fly. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The reputation in the Battle of Britain was of a plane that was more forgiving and a more stable gun platform than the Spitfire. The more concentrated gun locations also helped here.

Aaron_GT
12-23-2005, 10:07 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">I'll take the opinions of those who flew the the real thing at the time. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well you have to use all the information, but this one case of a restored Hurricane seems to have different characteristics to all other reports of them, so it might be that one plane.

The article said:
"No matter what the data says, this instability in pitch fairly screams at me that the airplane is tail-heavy,"

So it sounds like the plane tested had a balance or trim problem.

TAW_Oilburner
12-23-2005, 06:51 PM
It's been a while since I read the article but I also remember them adding a water tank/sprayer for the radiator. As has been said, the reputation as an extremely stable gun platform is one that is very hard to refute.