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Shrap
06-16-2005, 08:12 PM
Ok what is rudder trim and aileron trim and what does it do?

In fact what is a aileron (I know what a rudder is).

Shrap
06-16-2005, 08:12 PM
Ok what is rudder trim and aileron trim and what does it do?

In fact what is a aileron (I know what a rudder is).

The_Gorey
06-16-2005, 08:16 PM
ailerons are the flight control surfaces on your wings.. they allow you to roll the plane left and right.

trim, is just a small tab on the control surface. by deflecting it up or down into the airflow you can "load" the control surface. makes flying easier as you don't have to hold 10lbs of back stick pressure (for example) to keep the nose level.

not all planes have all surfaces trimmable. the 109 & 190 for example only have elevator trim.

nickdanger3
06-16-2005, 08:26 PM
You've probably noticed that if you are flying straight and level and throttle up or down, the nose will rise or drop. To maintain level flight you need to trim - think of it as tuning the plane to fly the way you want at a given speed.

Perhaps more to the point, why trim?

It let's you go faster since you aren't making a bunch of corrections and letting the plane do the work for you.

heywooood
06-16-2005, 09:36 PM
trimming a boat or plane is a reference to the making of small adjustments to the control surfaces etc. to maximize both speed and performance in flight or through the water.

Some planes are equipped with small tabs on the control surfaces...rudder trim tabs..aileron tabs...elevator tabs, so the pilot can make minute adjustments to pitch, yaw and roll to keep the airplane flying a true - clean line through the air. This improves speed by reducing drag from larger, constant full rudder, aileron, and elevator movements.

On a sailboat - you trim by adjusting the various sails to get maximum speed and reduce luff/drag effects. You can also use ballast to good effect by shifting crew and other objects to add weight distribution into the equation.

Airframe mfg's try to do this when they position fuel tanks and other heavy objects within the airframe...they will also include recommended fuel tank usage to maintain even 'ballast' during flight for optimum performance.

Shrap
06-16-2005, 09:44 PM
So when I'm trimming my goal is to get it so that the plane doesn't alter course if I throttle up or down?

jarink
06-16-2005, 10:11 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Shrap:
So when I'm trimming my goal is to get it so that the plane doesn't alter course if I throttle up or down? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

For cruising flight, yes. A properly trimmed airplane also maneuvers more easily. Additionally, some people advocate the use of trim during combat to give you "extra" control. For example, if you're in a turn fight and pulling back on the stick, you can usually get a tighter turn by adjusting the elevator trim for more nose-up force.

Foxtrot_14
06-17-2005, 12:11 AM
The problem I have with rudder trim and aileron trim is that I don't have the controls for it. On a rotary switch seems most natural, but they're both used up. I'm using an X45 throttle combined with a Saitek 3D Rumble Force joystick. I'm using the bottom rotary for elevator trim and the top for brakes.

I tried setting rudder trim to arrow keys but I can't get them to work.

What is everyone using?

Izzy5
06-17-2005, 09:47 AM
I fly using an x45 throttle and joystick. I have the top rotary on the throttle set to aileron trim and the bottom one set to elevator trim. I have my mouse wheel set to rudder trim, although I am also experimenting with having rudder trim on pov hat 1 (mode 1 + pinkie switch) mapped to key presses as defined in the IL2 control menu. I have my brakes set to the joystick trigger in mode 2 (all my take off and landing controls are in mode 2, normal flight/combat in mode 1 and engine selection etc in mode 3).