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View Full Version : Short sunderland vs 8 Ju-88's



NAFP_supah
12-21-2006, 10:57 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by freiw44:
So far I noticed:
1) Engines, that is obvious, slightely modified.
2) Tail section - from the 262
3) tachometers - almost a direct copy
4) Artificial horizon with slip indicator (but not turn, that one omitted)
5) Compass (gyrocompass?)
6) Wings are similar to he-162. I think in they gave both craft a good roll, and high as well as low-speed performance.

I flew against it in a yp-80 without luck. Its a good energy fighter, and the high-altitude airfoil peformance is very good.

Cant help but laugh at the heat-shielded tail. "Comrade, what about the coanda effect?" - "well at least germans didn`t have that!" </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Coanda effect being that gasses stick to a nearby surface right?<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://supah.chaotic.nl/profiles/profile-sig.jpg (http://supah.chaotic.nl)

Badsight-
12-22-2006, 03:42 AM
what ive read is that the guys who flew didnt like it & were glad to get out of it once other jets came out

Thanatos833
12-22-2006, 10:59 AM
I've read about this in various places, so it is certainly factual, many of you may have heard about it.



The rifle-calibre .303 guns were far from satisfactory as they lacked hitting power but the Sunderland retained its reputation for being able to take care of itself. This reputation was enhanced by a savage air battle between eight Ju 88C long-range heavy fighters and a single RAAF Sunderland Mark III on June 2, 1943. There were 11 crewmen on board the Sunderland, including nine Australians and two British. The crew was on an anti-submarine patrol and also searching for remains of BOAC Flight 777, an airliner that had left Gibraltar the day before and subsequently been shot down over the Bay of Biscay.

In the late afternoon one of the crew spotted the eight Ju 88s. Bombs and depth charges were dumped while the pilot, Walker, redlined the engines. Two Ju 88s made passes at the flying boat, one from each side, scoring hits while the Sunderland went through wild "corkscrew" evasive manoeuvres. The fighters managed to knock out one engine. On the third pass of the fighters, the top-turret gunner managed to shoot one down. Another Ju 88 disabled the tail turret but the next fighter that made a pass was bracketed by the top and nose turrets and shot down as well.

Still another fighter attacked, smashing the Sunderland's radio gear, wounding most of the crew in varying degrees and mortally wounding one of the side gunners. A Ju 88 tried to attack from the rear but the tail turret gunner had managed to regain some control over the turret and shot it down. The surviving fighters pressed home their attacks despite the losses. The nose gunner chewed up one of the fighters and set one of its engines on fire. Two more of the attackers were thoroughly shot up and the other two finally decided they had had enough and departed. Luftwaffe records indicate these were the only two that made it back to base.

How was it able to do this? If only the heavy allied bombers over Europe had this ability.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/9285/do17in9.jpg

The Dornier Do-17, another brilliant example of German engineering, a ???Schnellbomber" which could just outrun all fighters, this plane led to the German victory in the Battle of Britain and indeed, the Second World War.

Thanatos833
12-22-2006, 10:59 AM
I've read about this in various places, so it is certainly factual, many of you may have heard about it.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">
The rifle-calibre .303 guns were far from satisfactory as they lacked hitting power but the Sunderland retained its reputation for being able to take care of itself. This reputation was enhanced by a savage air battle between eight Ju 88C long-range heavy fighters and a single RAAF Sunderland Mark III on June 2, 1943. There were 11 crewmen on board the Sunderland, including nine Australians and two British. The crew was on an anti-submarine patrol and also searching for remains of BOAC Flight 777, an airliner that had left Gibraltar the day before and subsequently been shot down over the Bay of Biscay.

In the late afternoon one of the crew spotted the eight Ju 88s. Bombs and depth charges were dumped while the pilot, Walker, redlined the engines. Two Ju 88s made passes at the flying boat, one from each side, scoring hits while the Sunderland went through wild "corkscrew" evasive manoeuvres. The fighters managed to knock out one engine. On the third pass of the fighters, the top-turret gunner managed to shoot one down. Another Ju 88 disabled the tail turret but the next fighter that made a pass was bracketed by the top and nose turrets and shot down as well.

Still another fighter attacked, smashing the Sunderland's radio gear, wounding most of the crew in varying degrees and mortally wounding one of the side gunners. A Ju 88 tried to attack from the rear but the tail turret gunner had managed to regain some control over the turret and shot it down. The surviving fighters pressed home their attacks despite the losses. The nose gunner chewed up one of the fighters and set one of its engines on fire. Two more of the attackers were thoroughly shot up and the other two finally decided they had had enough and departed. Luftwaffe records indicate these were the only two that made it back to base. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

How was it able to do this? If only the heavy allied bombers over Europe had this ability.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/9285/do17in9.jpg

The Dornier Do-17, another brilliant example of German engineering, a ???Schnellbomber" which could just outrun all fighters, this plane led to the German victory in the Battle of Britain and indeed, the Second World War.

freiw44
12-22-2006, 12:41 PM
Yes coanda effect propably caused a significant weight addition just to keep the tail from melting or deforming.

I think the whole plane was an emergency stop-gap in case of war with the previous allies like Britain or US.