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Enforcer572005
07-08-2006, 11:54 AM
This is about as good a place as any to post this, since most of you guys have some interest
in aviation, especially military aviation. Some of you may remember my post some mos ago of an airshow act he was in going a bit off...that's in here to.

It took a car wreck 25 yrs to kill my Dad, yet even though it took his ability to walk, it didnt stop his flying. Only his declining health and eyesight did that about 7 yrs ago.

For 8 yrs he was a regular almost daily contributor to Ludlow Porch's radio show (in the southern US). His yarns were very popular, as more than a half century of flying for both fun and a living gave him plenty of material.He never saw a day of actual combat,but his contribution to military avaition was extensive, and many pilots from an assortment of nations let him know (often) that thier lives were saved in combat by what he had taught them.

This is about 20 or so photos, so if you could minimise commenting till im done....thanx.

Here He is helping his friend Henry do an insane airshow act that involved tumbling off a ladder of a clipped wing J-3 at 28 knts. He asked my Dad to fly for him at this show, and since he didnt want some noob getting his friend killed, he relunctantly accepted. However, his foot got caught for a few seconds, resulting in this unique hemoroid treatment before he finally got free. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/Hemmoriodtreatmentcroppedreduced.jpg

Here is the 19 yr old AAF private (left) hanging out on the flight line with P-51s he wishes he was flying, in occupied Japan, 1946.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/AAFF-51Japan1948reduced.jpg

My Dad took this photo of his 2 very board friends with no war to fight....yet. Note the appropriate nose art. the artist hadnt painted the chick yet.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/5-photo-by-Wild-Bill-too-much-time-.jpg

He came home in 49, having his fill of peacetime service, and got a job as the 3rd guy on DC-3s for a time at Eastern Airlines. Then Korea came along, and the USAF needed pilots...fast. He got a job as a link instructor at Spence AFB in South Ga., then
became a regular flight instructor for a civilian contract school. In the meantime, He
obtained an Aeronica Champ and married my mother, who was also a pilot with her own
J-3. Here he is in preferred element in the
Champ.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/AbovethecloudsinhisAeronicaChamp195.jpg

He went from instructing primary
in T-34s to basic in The 'new' T-28A. He's
on the rt with a cadet student. Note the size of these underpowered machines.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/T-28Ascirca1955reduced.jpg

then about 1958, The T-28s were replaced by T-37s. One of his favorite rides. He's in the right seat, where the instructor's position is.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/T-37Areduced.jpg

I had just started walking when this
was taken in 59. I actually have a vague memory of my mother holding me while
he opened the canopy. I guess the
sound of the motor must've impressed me. Dependans could go out on the flight
line back then, even when they were
dependants of civie contract instructors.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/T-370001DadwT-37-2reduced.jpg

He also did alot of fun stuff with
his assortment of "interesting"
associates. Here he's helping ferry
(in the back seat)
a Ryan PT-22 his friend EB Pirkle
bought. (His friends had such aviation
sounding names.) What you cant see
is the huge oil slick on the opposite
side of the fuselage that was
forcing them to find an airport.
Still had time for a photo-op though.
note position of flaps.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/PT-22colorscanreduced.jpg

In 61, the USAF made the ingenious decision to do all basic and advanced training in house, so
he had to find another job. The Army still
used civilian instructors (as they still do)
and things were starting to heat up in a
place called Vietnam. They also still did fixed
wing training. Here he's with some other
instructors (on rt) and an L-19 circa 1963(USAF called them O-1s).
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/withL-19andinstructorsFt.jpg

In 65, the Army started letting the air force
train all its fixed wing guys, as they were
converting almost completely to helicopters.
They also needed LOTs of pilots for Vietnam.
Here he's with a student and a TH-13 (on rt)
in oct 1966 at Fort Rucker Ala. teaching
instruments. (yes, its a Bell47).
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/WithLt.jpg

Enforcer572005
07-08-2006, 11:54 AM
This is about as good a place as any to post this, since most of you guys have some interest
in aviation, especially military aviation. Some of you may remember my post some mos ago of an airshow act he was in going a bit off...that's in here to.

It took a car wreck 25 yrs to kill my Dad, yet even though it took his ability to walk, it didnt stop his flying. Only his declining health and eyesight did that about 7 yrs ago.

For 8 yrs he was a regular almost daily contributor to Ludlow Porch's radio show (in the southern US). His yarns were very popular, as more than a half century of flying for both fun and a living gave him plenty of material.He never saw a day of actual combat,but his contribution to military avaition was extensive, and many pilots from an assortment of nations let him know (often) that thier lives were saved in combat by what he had taught them.

This is about 20 or so photos, so if you could minimise commenting till im done....thanx.

Here He is helping his friend Henry do an insane airshow act that involved tumbling off a ladder of a clipped wing J-3 at 28 knts. He asked my Dad to fly for him at this show, and since he didnt want some noob getting his friend killed, he relunctantly accepted. However, his foot got caught for a few seconds, resulting in this unique hemoroid treatment before he finally got free. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/Hemmoriodtreatmentcroppedreduced.jpg

Here is the 19 yr old AAF private (left) hanging out on the flight line with P-51s he wishes he was flying, in occupied Japan, 1946.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/AAFF-51Japan1948reduced.jpg

My Dad took this photo of his 2 very board friends with no war to fight....yet. Note the appropriate nose art. the artist hadnt painted the chick yet.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/5-photo-by-Wild-Bill-too-much-time-.jpg

He came home in 49, having his fill of peacetime service, and got a job as the 3rd guy on DC-3s for a time at Eastern Airlines. Then Korea came along, and the USAF needed pilots...fast. He got a job as a link instructor at Spence AFB in South Ga., then
became a regular flight instructor for a civilian contract school. In the meantime, He
obtained an Aeronica Champ and married my mother, who was also a pilot with her own
J-3. Here he is in preferred element in the
Champ.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/AbovethecloudsinhisAeronicaChamp195.jpg

He went from instructing primary
in T-34s to basic in The 'new' T-28A. He's
on the rt with a cadet student. Note the size of these underpowered machines.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/T-28Ascirca1955reduced.jpg

then about 1958, The T-28s were replaced by T-37s. One of his favorite rides. He's in the right seat, where the instructor's position is.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/T-37Areduced.jpg

I had just started walking when this
was taken in 59. I actually have a vague memory of my mother holding me while
he opened the canopy. I guess the
sound of the motor must've impressed me. Dependans could go out on the flight
line back then, even when they were
dependants of civie contract instructors.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/T-370001DadwT-37-2reduced.jpg

He also did alot of fun stuff with
his assortment of "interesting"
associates. Here he's helping ferry
(in the back seat)
a Ryan PT-22 his friend EB Pirkle
bought. (His friends had such aviation
sounding names.) What you cant see
is the huge oil slick on the opposite
side of the fuselage that was
forcing them to find an airport.
Still had time for a photo-op though.
note position of flaps.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/PT-22colorscanreduced.jpg

In 61, the USAF made the ingenious decision to do all basic and advanced training in house, so
he had to find another job. The Army still
used civilian instructors (as they still do)
and things were starting to heat up in a
place called Vietnam. They also still did fixed
wing training. Here he's with some other
instructors (on rt) and an L-19 circa 1963(USAF called them O-1s).
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/withL-19andinstructorsFt.jpg

In 65, the Army started letting the air force
train all its fixed wing guys, as they were
converting almost completely to helicopters.
They also needed LOTs of pilots for Vietnam.
Here he's with a student and a TH-13 (on rt)
in oct 1966 at Fort Rucker Ala. teaching
instruments. (yes, its a Bell47).
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/WithLt.jpg

Enforcer572005
07-08-2006, 12:42 PM
It's 1974, and he's assigned to
instructing South Vietnamese students.
Here he's with a VNAF lt and a Hughes
TH-55, or as he called it, a really
h orny easteregg. His Viet students
were among his favorites, all very
eagar and motivated as well as some of
his best students. This was taken by
another VNAF student-they all referred
to him as "my dady" (with one d). I
remember going to the base once and
seeing a bunch of these guys come
running up to him like he really was.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/TH-55Lt.jpg

And now for something completely
different. When the usual poorly
thought out defence cuts came along,
he found a new home with Bell
Helicopter, training the Imperial
Iranian Army to fly the HUGE amount
of equipment the Shah bought from us.
He's leading a flight of primary
students in Bell 206s
on a cross country in the
middle of a very hot and empty
Iranian desert, somewhere near Isfahan
in 1975.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/Bell206endlessIraniandesert1975redu.jpg

He progressed from 206s to
teaching advanced in UH-1Hs,
then tactics in AH-1J Cobras-
his absolute all time favorite
ride. Here an Iranian student
takes this of him in the command
cockpit, as he usually flew in
the gunners/instructors position
forward. This day they were
giving the students time in the
gunners position.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/AH-1JpilotcockpitIran77CROPPEDTEXTa.jpg

LStarosta
07-08-2006, 12:49 PM
Great photos! Thanks!

Taylortony
07-08-2006, 12:51 PM
What a superb tribute to him from a loving son.

Long may he Rest In Peace and fly the clouds above free from the cares of the world....................................

Enforcer572005
07-08-2006, 12:56 PM
thanks guys, there's a few more, and this is
the condensed version.

Here he and a student (he's in the forward cockpit where he usually flew from) on the way through some mountains near the Iraqi border
in 78 on the way to the range. He's got a full load of 2.75" rockets and 20mm. I gotta get the 8mm films of shooting all that stuff on video somehow so i can upload it..some great stuff.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/CobraoverIran77reducedto35reduced.jpg

After narrowly getting out of Iran after our govt decided to abandon Iran, he went to
work for Arizona helicopters in Scottsdale
fighting fires in the Ca, Utah, and new mexico.
California was almost like being in combat,
making delivery of fire fighters (mostly
inmates who did a fearless job), dropping
water and flurry, and using a helitorch to
start backfires. He also did many medivacs of
both firecrews and civilians, and emergency
evacuations of both as well.
Here a news reporter took this photo of him
lifting a bucket out of a lake fighting a
fire in the ca mtns.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/Liftingwaterbucketwhilefirefighting.jpg

Ok, i had to resize some of these even smaller.
He made alot of emergency flights in that job,
as he technically was a fireman in the fire
season of the biggest tenderbox on earth. He
made the local CA papers several times, and also
the tv news. He pulled many people off those
ridges as fire was closing in, trees were literally exploding (he'd never seen that before), and several times had fire licking at
the skids as he took off overloading the Bell
Longrangers with the cabin full and guys on
the skids (got the dogs to).

THis is another newspaper photo of him using a
common technique in the hot density altitude
of those mtns....diving off a ridge to load
the rotors. It was daylight to well after
dusk, and thru the night sometimes.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/Bell206divingoffridgeCa79reducedcro.jpg

Here he's with one of the fire crews he worked
with that included some
he had earlier pulled off a ridge
that was so thin he had to balance the AC on
it while everyone climbed in and on the skids.
Note the invaluable dog, as well as the rangers
and other pilots. He's on the back rt
a bit after all the exitment. He really enjoyed
this work, as it was sort of like the
combat tour he never had.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/WithfireteamathelitacbaseCalifornia.jpg

Stackhouse25th
07-08-2006, 01:25 PM
im hoping my flight story is that way some day http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Enforcer572005
07-08-2006, 01:28 PM
After Pres. Reagan came along and reminded
everyone that the country still needed a
military, He went back to work at Ft. Rucker, working for Northrop (which had the contract
using Bell and Hughes AC) and wound up being
thier chief test pilot at Ft. Rucker;this
entailed being in charge of the section that
tested AC that had been worked on and checking
that everything worked. THis had been his last
job in Iran as Bell's chief test pilot there.

It was during this time in 1981
that He got hit in the drivers side by some speeding kid near Dothan ala on his way to
work and was nearly killed. He wound up paralyzed and
suffered terribly, but never gave up hope
of flying again. After a couple of yrs, he
recovered enough to get an ultralight
modified with rudder in the stick (they
only had rudder and elevator). He flew 2
of these for many yrs, having more engine
failures and forced landings than he ever
did in anything else. When nobody else could
figure out why, he took the kawasaki snow-
mobile engine apart and found that a gasket
had been left out. After that he had no
problems.

Here he is taking off at my grandparents
small backwoods strip in N. Ga. in his
Condor.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/TakeoffinCondormodifiedwithhandcont.jpg

In 83, Atlanta ch.11 did a story on him, as this was pretty original for back then. His
friends would sometimes fly in the small strip
where he lived, and it's kinda interesting
to be woken up by an OH-6, Huey, or even a
CH-54 SKycrane buzzing your house then
sometimes even landing in your back yard.
You guys wouldnt believe the stories
associated with this. I couldnt sometimes
myself.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/ch11storyin1983shannonreducedto35.jpg

heywooood
07-08-2006, 01:35 PM
a courageous fellow was your pops, and this is a fine tribute to a full and happy life it seems.

Thanks to him and all who serve the USA.

Rebel_Yell_21
07-08-2006, 01:39 PM
Godspeed.

Enforcer572005
07-08-2006, 01:47 PM
Thanks guys. There are just 2 more after this one, then ill be done.

He continued to build RC models and fly them with the local RC club in Cave Sprgs Ga; this guy was a master at this, and had been involved in RC since the first ones came out with just a button for rudder. He managed to do this despite being in constant
pain. In fact, that only time the pain stopped
was when he was flying the condors. Go figure.
Anyway, he's in his shop doing his thing. I used to go with him to fly on weekends at Ft Rucker, and I could write a hilarious book
about those goofballs.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/StillbuildingRCmodelscirca1985despi.jpg

Just one more after this......

After 25 yrs or incredible suffering and
more incredible overcoming, his body finally
shut down due to the injuries he had suffered.
Next time somebody tells you they're afraid of
flying, tell them about the guy with over 13000
hrs logged flying time in all those AC, and he
never got a scratch, despite many emergencies, including forced landings, engine fires and
failures, near midairs, and loosing a wheel on
takeoff to a grass covered hole.

He was buried July 5 2006 with military rites
performed by an amazingly sharp American
Legion rifle team, most of whom were old enough
to use the M-1s they were firing when they
were in combat. I put his flight helmet he had
used in Iran on his casket, as he was buried
in the bright yellow Bell flight suit he
used as chief test pilot in Iran. His short time in the AAF/USAF technically qualified him
as a veteran, but his contribution to American
military aviation was much greater than that.

There's a lot of guys and their kids running
around now (and maybe on this forum) who can
thank him for thier continued existance. When
i was a kid in Enterprise Ala, he would take me
to town, and we ALWAYS ran into some pilot
who had returned from a tour in Vietnam, and
EVERYONE of them had been shot down at least
once, and all credited him with their survival.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/IMGP0999cropped-1.jpg


He always regretted what had happened to
his Iranian and SouthVietnamese students,
and he considered their fate to be a gross
injustice. To him, loyalty and cameraderie
transcended politics; he agreed with the Ranger
creed of "leave no man behind", but was in no
position to do anything about it. If he could
have, he'd have flown into both those places
to get those guys out-just the kinda guy he
was. If you were his friend, you had a friend
for life whose loyalty you could depend on.

When at Spence AFB, his students had often
been assigned the callsign 'Tiger Flight', which he thought was kinda cool, and he used
it often during his later career.

All I can conclude this with is that he has
been cleared for his final take-off.

Tiger flight out.

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/ultralighttakeoffreduced.jpg

slipBall
07-08-2006, 01:50 PM
You had a http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif Pop, I enjoyed the pics http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

joeap
07-08-2006, 02:08 PM
Wonderful pics. Wonderful tribute. That's all. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

badaboom.1
07-08-2006, 03:01 PM
The Apple doesn't fall far from the tree Enforcer572005!!! You are a credit to your father......What a beautifull tribute to him!!!
You're a good man as he was....YOU ARE THE TIGER NOW MY FRIEND!!!!!!! Salute!

Esel1964
07-08-2006, 03:19 PM
May he fly on forever;but,should he need a break,I'm sure he's got permanent approach clearance to the best runway of all,Heaven.

Condolences to you and your family.

danjama
07-08-2006, 03:44 PM
I am speechless here http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

Good show sir, rest in peace. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

Thanks for sharing this with us...

p1ngu666
07-08-2006, 04:09 PM
wow, amazing guy http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

i would say RIP, but i bet *right* now hes upto some high jinks http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

JG52Uther
07-08-2006, 04:38 PM
An amazing and full life.

willyvic
07-08-2006, 04:46 PM
Personal, heart felt, and touching.

You are a good son.

Haigotron
07-08-2006, 04:49 PM
An angel when alive, and an angel even after, he'll always soar http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

blairgowrie
07-08-2006, 05:15 PM
Thanks Enforcer m8. Very humbling.

BG

Beaufort-RAF
07-08-2006, 06:46 PM
Very nice tribute.

-HH-Dubbo
07-08-2006, 07:00 PM
Condolences mate. A very touching tribute.

skarden
07-08-2006, 08:06 PM
Wow.A great read about a hell of a man.My condolences enforcer.
Your father is proof that if your will is strong enough nothing will stop you from doing what you love.

<S>

Sintubin
07-08-2006, 09:11 PM
No words just RESPECT http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

dieg777
07-09-2006, 01:45 AM
~S~

A fine tribute to someone special

My condolences to you and your family mate

B16Enk
07-09-2006, 04:15 AM
~S~ M8, a wonderful tribute.

Please accept my condolences too, and thank you for the great effort you put into posting that for your Father and us.

Old_Canuck
07-09-2006, 02:44 PM
A moving tribute to a special Dad. S~

Zeus-cat
07-09-2006, 04:10 PM
Well done sir, well done.

ytareh
07-09-2006, 05:57 PM
Very moving, thanks for sharing,condolences to you and yours...

-HH- Beebop
07-09-2006, 09:26 PM
http://www.republicanandproud.com/Memorial%20Day%20Salute%20001.jpg

To a good man.

You have a fine son sir!

wayno7777
07-09-2006, 10:10 PM
~S~ and Godspeed. A beautiful, soaring tribute! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif May his Condor never run out of fuel....

Udidtoo
07-09-2006, 11:25 PM
Some men are called Sir simply due to rank. A stripe,bar or star. Then there are the men like your pop.S'

ddpairborne59
07-10-2006, 12:32 AM
I was touched, Condolences to you and your family.Thank you for sharing.~S~

TC_Stele
07-10-2006, 01:13 AM
I bet he was a great guy, but you already know that. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

WTE_Ibis
07-10-2006, 01:19 AM
An amazing life and a stirring tribute from his
son.
These times bring home to us just how short life is, even when lived to the fullest.
I too have lost a parent, a brother and friends and there is little one can say to ease the loss.
May he fly with a tail wind.
S`
Ibis.

mrsiCkstar
07-10-2006, 08:01 AM
I'm at a loss for words really. A superb tribute!

Enforcer572005
07-11-2006, 11:49 AM
Thanks guys, Im sure he would be flattered and honored by your comments and regard.

I just realized that the first photo may be a bit confusing.....He is the one flying the cub, not the masochist dragging on the ground. He only did that to keep his pal Henry from getting killed-good thing to, since that little problem arose. Ok, back to the virtual war. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Heavy_Weather
07-11-2006, 01:02 PM
wow your dad was a very involved and great guy, what a rich life to live. thx for sharing sir, and God bless you and your father. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Cold_Gambler
07-11-2006, 01:21 PM
Fantastic thread. He sure sounds like he knew how to get the most from life...
S!

Abbuzze
07-11-2006, 01:25 PM
I just can say thank you!

Ob.Emann
07-11-2006, 01:35 PM
An absolutely amazing man.

Thanks for posting!

DuxCorvan
07-11-2006, 01:48 PM
Watching his earlier pics and his later ones you can see a same soul behind the same smile and eyes. I know an ever young spirit when I see it.

Thanks for sharing this moving tribute to a man who always flew high, and still does. Be sure.

Enforcer572005
07-11-2006, 08:32 PM
Thanx guys. I put some more pix on the K-9 squadrons site; P-51 shots, Cobras in Iran etc. Some neat stuff he took photos of in occupied
japan as well, including Nagasake as he rode thru on a train. I thought most virtual pilots would find such interesting-you can be sure they have not been published before. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

http://forums.dangerdogz.com/viewtopic.php?t=506

danjama
07-11-2006, 08:52 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WTE_Ibis:
May he fly with a tail wind.
S`
Ibis. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I read thewhole thing again, and im still touched.

Ditto to what Ibis said http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

slo_1_2_3
07-19-2006, 12:32 AM
~S~

Dunkelgrun
07-19-2006, 02:42 AM
Thanks Enforcer, a wonderful tribute to a man that lived a good and full life.
Condolences to you and yours.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif to your old man.
S!

Flying_Nutcase
07-19-2006, 03:05 AM
Ditto to all the above. He was apparently as good at being a father as he was at being a pilot and trainer. S! Enforcer. He lived a good life.

Bearcat99
07-19-2006, 07:52 AM
"Honor your mother and father so that your days will be long upon the Earth..... "

I am certain that he knew he was loved and respected by his son everyday of his life and that your love kept him going through some of those dark days.....

What a well done tribute from a good son for a good man..... he taught you well. ~!S!~

Jungmann
07-19-2006, 11:43 AM
I felt sad for you, reading your tribute, but also happy. You have so much to remember him by.

Cheers,

BfHeFwMe
07-19-2006, 09:53 PM
Can't never keep a good man down, what an amazing silent hero.

woofiedog
07-20-2006, 03:38 AM
Sorry to hear of your family's loss. Your father had Quite the career in flying.

Thank's for sharing some of his life with us.

May God Bless