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View Full Version : reproducing pilot psychology of the time



PikeBishop
06-30-2006, 05:34 AM
Dear All,
It just occured to me that there is an inherent problem with all historical simulators with respect of how pilots dealt with the unknown factors of air warfare. That is for example, when pilots were faced for the first time with new enemy types they would automatically be very wary of them as they would know nothing of the relative performance of these new types. As we play this simulator we all know exactly how to deal with a FW190 if we are flying a P51 or visa-versa, or how to deal with a Zero if in a P40.
But back then in the real world pilots would have very few clues.....other than their comrades did not make it home so often after these encounters. One can then see how myths and reputations arise. I should think that had it not been for the Americans finding the intact Zero wreck on the Island of Aktan six months into WWII they would have lost many more pilots to enemy action. Prior to that find how many Pilots actually tried to 'avoid' combat with those nasty Zero's that you only believed could totally outclass you. Knowing that there was a good chance that you were not going to come home from an encounter must have had a marked effect on one's morale. OK, we know now that the Zero was not that fast, that it was lightly built etc. But back then it must have been frightening to say the least and it took time to develope tactics to improve your chances of survival.
Again, later in the war with types such as the Ki84 which would have been seen as a great improvement over the A6M as it could still outmanoeuvre and outclimb US types but could also take much more battle damage. But, again, until one was captured and tested US pilots were again faced with a formidable foe from which they might not survive an encounter. Clearly the Japanese tended to have a different view on life and death unlike the Americans who did not really want to die. So for those men the stress must have been considerable. Also Pilots would know nothing of any 'maintanence' problems that we are told today the the Japanese suffered from. Just think for a moment what would happen if we all knew nothing about how to deal with a particular type and you were only allowed to pass on the knowledge of a particular experience if you survived the encounter with the 'new' enemy type. How much harder would it be for each and every one of us to tolerate and survive this game?
Best regards,
SLP

PikeBishop
06-30-2006, 05:34 AM
Dear All,
It just occured to me that there is an inherent problem with all historical simulators with respect of how pilots dealt with the unknown factors of air warfare. That is for example, when pilots were faced for the first time with new enemy types they would automatically be very wary of them as they would know nothing of the relative performance of these new types. As we play this simulator we all know exactly how to deal with a FW190 if we are flying a P51 or visa-versa, or how to deal with a Zero if in a P40.
But back then in the real world pilots would have very few clues.....other than their comrades did not make it home so often after these encounters. One can then see how myths and reputations arise. I should think that had it not been for the Americans finding the intact Zero wreck on the Island of Aktan six months into WWII they would have lost many more pilots to enemy action. Prior to that find how many Pilots actually tried to 'avoid' combat with those nasty Zero's that you only believed could totally outclass you. Knowing that there was a good chance that you were not going to come home from an encounter must have had a marked effect on one's morale. OK, we know now that the Zero was not that fast, that it was lightly built etc. But back then it must have been frightening to say the least and it took time to develope tactics to improve your chances of survival.
Again, later in the war with types such as the Ki84 which would have been seen as a great improvement over the A6M as it could still outmanoeuvre and outclimb US types but could also take much more battle damage. But, again, until one was captured and tested US pilots were again faced with a formidable foe from which they might not survive an encounter. Clearly the Japanese tended to have a different view on life and death unlike the Americans who did not really want to die. So for those men the stress must have been considerable. Also Pilots would know nothing of any 'maintanence' problems that we are told today the the Japanese suffered from. Just think for a moment what would happen if we all knew nothing about how to deal with a particular type and you were only allowed to pass on the knowledge of a particular experience if you survived the encounter with the 'new' enemy type. How much harder would it be for each and every one of us to tolerate and survive this game?
Best regards,
SLP

TgD Thunderbolt56
06-30-2006, 06:42 AM
good points, but as has been stated many times before, this is a a game. One that, for me, allows a certain amount of vicarious experience that otherwise would be impossible. If you consider the current lifespan of this sim, it's a foregone conclusion that many have more hours in specific planetypes than their RL counterparts ever had. Despite that, look at a stats-page for just about any server that keeps them and you'll see only a handful of pilots with K/D ratios over 2.

It's apples & oranges mate.


TB