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ClnlSandersLite
02-19-2005, 07:13 PM
Well, some time ago, I posted aboutthe BI-1 reaching insane altitudes in the game. A couple of people mentioned bailing at those altitudes, and I just got around to doing it. This is in essence a follow up. Bailed at roughly 90k feet (yes, I know the difference between feet and meters). Time from the pilot leaving the cockpit to touching the ground: 15m 11s +/- 2 seconds. The pilot (supprisingly) free fell most of the distance. I'm not sure what altitude he opened it at as the pilot has no altimiter on him http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. I'd say it was under 10k feet when he opened his chute though, just eyeballing it of course. If anyone cares to figure out just how fast a pilot falls on his chute, I could tell you pretty precisely.

FI-Aflak
02-19-2005, 07:29 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ClnlSandersLite:
Well, some time ago, I posted aboutthe BI-1 reaching insane altitudes in the game. A couple of people mentioned bailing at those altitudes, and I just got around to doing it. This is in essence a follow up. Bailed at roughly 90k feet (yes, I know the difference between feet and meters). Time from the pilot leaving the cockpit to touching the ground: 15m 11s +/- 2 seconds. The pilot (supprisingly) free fell most of the distance. I'm not sure what altitude he opened it at as the pilot has no altimiter on him http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. I'd say it was under 10k feet when he opened his chute though, just eyeballing it of course. If anyone cares to figure out just how fast a pilot falls on his chute, I could tell you pretty precisely. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The pilots always freefall most of the way down from high alts, basically skydiving.

The human body reaches a speed where the drag equals the weight, thus speed is constant. Called terminal velocity. This is slower at lower alts, but I don't think this is the reason the hold off on their chutes.

They probably did it then to get out of a situation where enemy pilots could take potshots at them.

ClnlSandersLite
02-19-2005, 08:09 PM
I know they do it irl, what I'm supprised about is that it's modelled in game. Most of the time, in prop sims, they don't do this.

AlGroover
02-19-2005, 09:44 PM
I believe that a lot of pilots bailing out at great altitude died of hypoxia on the way down. Should it be modelled? I think that Oleg has enough to do.

Maj_Death
02-19-2005, 11:29 PM
I've noticed shoots don't open until around 3000m. I've bailed out as high as 13,000m from my Bf-110G. Didn't even plan to bail, some punk*ss P-47 blew off my tail at that height, and he had an altitude advantage too http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif. Don't remember who it was but it was probebly VFC*Korolov, he flies that high.

Fliegeroffizier
02-20-2005, 11:59 AM
In the modern/jet era, one has oxygen bottle along with the chute. Above, say, 14,000 feet you will black out or die from lack of oxygen.

While I could easily be wrong, I don't think that WWII flyers had Oxygen(bottles) with their chutes, thus they would avoid opening chutes if they felt they were considerably higher than 14,000 feet...it would be a trade off between falling faster(free fall) and therefore needing less time with limited Oxygen versus passing out before pulling the D ring and opening the chute...
It would be a real guessing game for a guy under a hell of a lot of stress after having just bailed out(at Whatever altitude!) in combat.

In the modern era, again, chutes will automatically open at the lower altitude (let's say 14,000 feet) even if the pilot is unconscious.

Here is a discussion of the world's high altitude bail out record (http://hypertextbook.com/facts/JianHuang.shtml) in which the pilot jumped from 102,000feet and reached velocity of 714MPH, breaking the sound barrier... He slowed to 250Mph at denser atmosphere of 50,000 feet and opened his chute at 18,000 feet. (He DID have pressure suit and Oxygen, of course)


Average human terminal velocity at lower altitudes(say below 10,000 feet or top of a moderately tall building) seems usually to be stated at roughly 120 Mph.

chaikanut
02-20-2005, 04:58 PM
He broke the sound barrier? Arms and legs still in their sockets? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif


I know, the air was too thin.

GreyBeast
02-20-2005, 05:40 PM
"...in which the pilot jumped from 102,000feet and reached velocity of 714MPH, breaking the sound barrier..."

LOL, that must be on HELL of a ride! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Owlsphone
02-20-2005, 10:11 PM
Above 10,000 feet you are supposed to use an oxygen mask. So when a pilot bails and free falls, he is free falling to get to the point where he can breathe under canopy otherwise he will die from lack of oxygen.

Another thing, right when you jump out of a plane, you are actually going faster than if you waited a few seconds for the wind resistance to slow you down. The pilot that bails must wait those few seconds before pulling the chute or he will get whiplash.

ClnlSandersLite
02-21-2005, 12:03 AM
Something I just noticed:
I select a custom pilot skin to fly with and bail out. The bailing pilot's skin is then the default. Is this a known bug?

tjaika1910
02-21-2005, 01:25 AM
How did you get that plane so high?

I tried with 100% fuel, QMB (10000 meter head start), out of fuel at <22000m (70000 feet)

Well it was quick and dirty with game speed 8X, but still, I had maximum starting altitude already...

tjaika1910
02-21-2005, 01:30 AM
BTW, Owlsphone (is it Hedwig?)

10000 feet is not so much, just 3000m. You certainly dont need extra O2 when walking on a mountain that high. Mount Everst is almost three times that high, and even there some (only sherpas can do it I think) have climbed up without extra oxygen.

GreyBeast
02-21-2005, 02:35 AM
Sherpas and (I think German-born) Reinhold Messner climb and climbed Mt. Everest without assisted breathing.

The first, I guess, because they were born at high altitude and know no other living conditions, their bodies are "used to it". The latter is known for being quite excentric, I'm surprised he needs oxigen at all http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif !!!

Proof of alien life on Planet Earth???

ClnlSandersLite
02-21-2005, 05:41 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>How did you get that plane so high? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Ok, few simple steps I followed. 100% fuel, Default Load.

Takeoff: Flaps, 100% throttle.

Transition to climb: 100% throttle. Immediately after leaving the ground, pull in flaps and gear and acellerate to 200 MPH.

Climb: 100% throttle. Keep the wings level (roll wise) and climb at 200 mph IAS (constant). At first this will be nearly vertical. As you get up to about 50-60k feet, you won't be able to hold that airspeed anymore so slow your climb to about 150 mph. Another 10k feet, and just keep what speed you can and still climb. If you get High enough, you'll need to occasionally drop flaps to force your nose up even with full stick. After a certain altitude you are on flaps until you run out of fuel. I'm not sure what the thing's optimal climb speed is but 200MPH works pretty well.
Descent: Assuming you kept a steady course during your trip up; VERY gently nose down and turn it -180 degrees and keep it in a shallow dive till you see home. From there you'll probably have to spiral down.

Notes: This plane has NO trim, so you have to fly manual the whole way. It's only got enough fuel for like 9 mins MAX at full throttle so that's not all that big a deal. With the BI's sparse instrumentation, this flight will be inexact, but it'll help if you have the speed bar on.

tjaika1910
02-21-2005, 08:26 AM
OK i dint use flaps and with 8X speed it was probably to unstable flight. Funny thing: I came up pretty high and far, far away from the pacific islands I started from, but with the head start of 10000m I was able to glide back to base with no fuel!

Owlsphone
02-21-2005, 11:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by tjaika1910:
BTW, Owlsphone (is it Hedwig?)

10000 feet is not so much, just 3000m. You certainly dont need extra O2 when walking on a mountain that high. Mount Everst is almost three times that high, and even there some (only sherpas can do it I think) have climbed up without extra oxygen. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

What I meant to say was that you're supposed to use oxygen over 10k. That is the point at which your brain starts to become affected by the lack of O2...not seriously, but still affected. Of course, if you've been living at high elevations for a while (such as the sherpas) your body is used to the conditions.

Oh, and my name comes more from a mascot than an actual owl.

Zeus-cat
02-21-2005, 12:37 PM
You can climb Mt Everest without O2, but you need to train extensively for it. If you were to take a person who lived at sea level and put them on Mt Everest without preparing them for it, I believe they would die from hypoxia rather quickly. My brother looked into climbing Mt Everset years ago, but the time involved (3 months minimum) and the cost ($50,000 at the time) were more than he could afford. You need to spend at least 6 weeks at base camp to let your body adjust to the thin air.

I used to work in the labratory that conducted some of the high altitude ballon tests. That was way before my time, but I did get to do some fun tests of my own using a crash test dummy and the rocket sled at Holloman Air Force Base.

The balloon they used for the high altitude jumps is on display at the Air force Museum near Dayton, Ohio.

Zeus-cat

tjaika1910
02-21-2005, 01:33 PM
If you stay as high as a base camp, your blood will try to adopt to the low O2 pressure. That means more hemoglobin. At a certain point, it gets dangerous because of the blood get too thick. The sherpas has an extremely efficient type of hemoglobin and dont suffer of this problem. But it is not enough to survive some minutes on top of the world. You are also supposed to walk up there http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

spiffalski
02-21-2005, 02:09 PM
when i did parachuting I was told 16k feet was the maximum you would jump without extra oxygen.
Note he said "would".

Above this its probably not comfortable. He also said that smokers can live around 3k feet above the rest of us when it comes to the amount of oxygen they can suck in through their tarred up lungs. So perhaps a healthy person can go 20k no problem.

I just dont know for sure.

EDIT: Incidentally I was told this 16k feet gave the maximum freefall duration: 1min 25 seconds

kutyaxxon
02-26-2005, 05:12 PM
i m a parachutist here too my highest altitude was 4700 meters(81sec freefall) i have been 5200 meters in an unpressed mi-17 it was no problem but some peoples feels dizzy here,so i think this is the 'safe line'about