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fpg909
08-09-2005, 08:03 PM
Afraid I don't understand how to use the tool helper. Where im confused is why 180 degrees is at 12 o'clock on the cursor? Someone mind explaining that right quick please?

fpg909
08-09-2005, 08:03 PM
Afraid I don't understand how to use the tool helper. Where im confused is why 180 degrees is at 12 o'clock on the cursor? Someone mind explaining that right quick please?

Poacher886a
08-10-2005, 12:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by fpg909:
Afraid I don't understand how to use the tool helper. Where im confused is why 180 degrees is at 12 o'clock on the cursor? Someone mind explaining that right quick please? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I have yet to see the point in any of the tool helper's!

Trydan
08-10-2005, 07:34 AM
Okay, let's take the ruler as an example. Imagine you wish to draw a line indicating a southeast (SE) course, in order to mark the rough course of a ship that has been reported and now appears on your map. You select the ruler, and then click on the plotted ship. Now, as you draw out the mouse, the line from the cursor to the first point you clicked is not going in the direction that you want that ship's course to run, but actually in the exact opposite direction. So, to make the line run SE (which is 135 degrees) you would need to make it run at 315 degrees on a "normal" potractor.

So... to make it easy, the numbers are plotted "inverted". If you want a line that runs SE (which is azimuth 135 degrees), then click and draw out the line, so that it lies under the 135 on the "helper".

Done.

(Alright, that wasn't a particularly good explanation, but it should help.)

lecek
08-10-2005, 08:42 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Trydan:
Okay, let's take the ruler as an example. Imagine you wish to draw a line indicating a southeast (SE) course, in order to mark the rough course of a ship that has been reported and now appears on your map. You select the ruler, and then click on the plotted ship. Now, as you draw out the mouse, the line from the cursor to the first point you clicked is not going in the direction that you want that ship's course to run, but actually in the exact opposite direction. So, to make the line run SE (which is 135 degrees) you would need to make it run at 315 degrees on a "normal" potractor.

So... to make it easy, the numbers are plotted "inverted". If you want a line that runs SE (which is azimuth 135 degrees), then click and draw out the line, so that it lies under the 135 on the "helper".

Done.

(Alright, that wasn't a particularly good explanation, but it should help.) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I am sorry but it doesn't. Perhaps some screen shots?

Poacher886a
08-10-2005, 10:04 AM
Ok/
Now say im traveling in a direction of 100deg and i get a hydrophone reading of a ship 20deg's of me....

...How the hell do i plot that line with the given tool's??

It would have been more help if we could have turned the protractor!

lecek
08-10-2005, 10:12 AM
two methods.

Method 1. Add 20 and 100. Select the protractor tool. Click above the ship. Click on the ship. Move out in the direction of 120. When you get there click a third time.

Method 2. Click ahead of your ship. Click again on your ship. Move out to about 20. Click when you have the correct number.

Going past 180 is the same except that you have to do math. For example using method 2.

Sound contact at 250. It is past 180 so I am going to subtract 250 from 360 = 110. I now do as in method 2 except that I go counterclockwise.

I think the essential point you are missing is that the protractor is a three click tool not a two click tool. You click a start point, you click a pivot point, you click a final point. You can adjust the tool after, which you often must because it is not the best designed.

paulhager
08-11-2005, 01:44 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by lecek:
two methods.

Method 1. Add 20 and 100. Select the protractor tool. Click above the ship. Click on the ship. Move out in the direction of 120. When you get there click a third time.

Method 2. Click ahead of your ship. Click again on your ship. Move out to about 20. Click when you have the correct number.

Going past 180 is the same except that you have to do math. For example using method 2.

Sound contact at 250. It is past 180 so I am going to subtract 250 from 360 = 110. I now do as in method 2 except that I go counterclockwise.

I think the essential point you are missing is that the protractor is a three click tool not a two click tool. You click a start point, you click a pivot point, you click a final point. You can adjust the tool after, which you often must because it is not the best designed. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That's a pretty good description of the process. I tend to use the protractor pretty frequently.

I stopped a game last night just before launching an attack on a convoy approaching Freetown. This was yet another instance of finding a convoy strickly by periodically submerging and listening DIRECTLY to the hydrophone.

When I first detected the convoy there was no way of knowing whether it was heading to or away from Freetown. All I had was a bearing relative to my boat from the hydrophone. I used the protractor to draw a long line in the direction of the sound and then made a 15 minute high speed run at a 30 degree offset north, submerging for another reading at that point. By making a series of shorter high speed runs (5 min) I was able to come up with a series of triangulations that gave me rough estimate of the course. Once I had that I was able to do an end-around run.

We'll see how things turn out...

aaronblood
08-11-2005, 03:40 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by fpg909:
Afraid I don't understand how to use the tool helper. Where im confused is why 180 degrees is at 12 o'clock on the cursor? Someone mind explaining that right quick please? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The point of it being reversed is so that it's usable. As you click and drag in a given direction, where the line intersects the protractor ring is the course heading of that line.

Just as an example, draw a line from your u-boat to a port and as your dragging the line, watch where the line intersects the protractor. That is the compass heading you'll have to turn your sub to in order to get to that port.

If it were right-side up, it would actually be more difficult to use.

Kaleun1961
11-04-2005, 05:35 PM
I'm bumping this thread for Sword of Light. He asked this question and this is the thread that anwers his question.

Sword_of_Light
11-07-2005, 12:27 PM
Well, thank you for bumping this. Er. It still doesnt make much sense to me - I mean, the tools without the protractor make plotting intercept courses pretty easy. What I need is a quick tool that will tell me exactly where to look in relation to my relative bearing for a contact - and thats not one thats inverted - because if it is then I have to think ok, it says bearing 2-2-5, so...flip that around....uh....thats port...so flip it to starboard....225 - 180 is....hell, math bad Don no like...35 degrees to starboard?
I'd much rather get a contact, click on the tool and have it tell me zero three five, F3 to the periscope, swivel to 035 off the bow, and hey! theres a faint shadow of a C3 in the fog and rain. Say hello to my little friend!

Kaleun1961
11-07-2005, 01:06 PM
I never use these tools as described in this method. I guess I'm just good at doing instinctive intercepts. It's almost like I have a radar built-in. As a convoy gets near, I'm like Spiderman: "Spidey senses tingling..."

macker33
11-09-2005, 04:38 AM
Somebody should change the distance measure tool to act like a real ruler.