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woofiedog
10-12-2006, 02:23 AM
In order to counter the introduction of German turbojet-powered aircraft such as the Me-262, the Soviet Union in 1944 began a crash program to develop a high-performance fighter which resulted in the Mikoyan-Gurevich I-250 (N).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/77/MiG-13.jpg
This mixed powerplant configuration enabled the I-250 to reach a maximum speed of 513 mph (825 km/h), but only for no more, than 10 minutes. Without jet engine working, maximum speed was 677 km/h.

Although the aircraft was largely conventional in layout, it featured a novel propulsion system which consisted of a Klimov VK-107R V-12 piston engine (mounted conventionally and driving a tractor propeller) which was connected, via an extension shaft, to a compressor with seven fuel burners. This produced a propulsive jet which was directed, and accelerated, through a variable rear nozzle (compare thermojet). This mixed powerplant configuration enabled the I-250 to reach a maximum speed of 513 mph (825 km/h), but for no more than 10 minutes. Without the jet engine working, maximum speed was 421 mph (677 km/h). The plane was named I-250 (for istrebitel - fighter), it also bore factory code designation: aircraft N.

The first prototype was flown on March 3, 1945. On July 5, 1945 it crashed due to tail damage, killing its test pilot, Alexander Deyev. Tests continued on the second prototype. At the same time, the first batch of 50 aircraft were ordered. However, the aircraft development met with numerous problems, and it was not ready to pass state evaluation. In the meantime, Soviet designers constructed the first real jet fighters, MiG-9 and Yak-15, which made the I-250 obsolete. Therefore, in early 1947 the VVS cancelled its further development. It was decided to pass the completed planes to the Naval Aviation, but the aircraft did not pass state evaluation, which ended in April 1948.

According to older sources, 50 aircraft were built from late 1945, and served with the Baltic Fleet and some Northern fighter units until 1950 under the designation MiG-13. However, new Russian sources claim that the number of completed planes was lower - possibly only 10-20, and there is no evidence of their service, nor of MiG-13 designation, which might have been an intended name for serial aircraft.

http://avia.russian.ee/pictures/russia/mig-13_1.jpg

Engine: 1x Klimov VK-107A piston engine / 1x Khalshchevnikov VRDK jetbooster
Wing Span: 9.5 m
Length: 8.18 m
Weight: Empty 2,935 kg / Loaded 3,680 kg
Maximum Speed: 825 km/h
Ceiling: 11,900 m
Range: 1,380 km
Crew: 1
Armament: 3x 20mm cannons

Links:
http://www.sergib.agava.ru/russia/mikoyan/i/250/i250_e.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermojet

Klimov VK-107

Klimov VK-107 is a V-12 liquid-cooled piston aircraft engine used by Soviet aircraft during World War II.

VK-107 was a brand-new design having little in common with its predecessors M-105 and VK-106. To achieve a greater power output, each cylinder now had four valves (two intake and two exhaust), crankshaft and camshafts were completely revised, and a new supercharger design was implemented. Although the engine could have been ready for production as early as 1942, Soviet factories lacked the capacity to produce a brand new design. Thus, less powerful VK-105PF and VK-105PF2 were built instead. However, the appearance of Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Me 109 with Daimler-Benz DB 605 engine in 1943 created an urgent demand for a more powerful engine. VK-107A was put into production in 1944 and was used on Yak-9U fighters. The engine was not well liked by either pilots or mechanics -- it had a life expectancy of only 25 hours and war emergency power was almost never used for fear of decreasing this even more. The engine was also difficult to service, in part because exhaust gas collectors were on the inside of the cylinder banks.

Variants

VK-107A - production version
VK-107R - version for hybrid piston-turbojet powered Mikoyan-Gurevich I-250 (N) and Sukhoi Su-5 fighters
VK-108 - attempt to further develop VK-107 with 1,380 kW (1,850 hp) on takeoff, used on several Yakovlev Yak-3 prototypes but did not enter production.

Specifications (VK-107A)
General characteristics
Type: 12-cylinder supercharged liquid-cooled Vee aircraft piston engine
Bore:
Stroke:
Displacement: 35.0 liters (2,135 in??)
Dry weight: 765 kg (1,685 lb)
Components
Valvetrain: Two intake and two exhaust valves per cylinder actuated via an overhead camshaft
Supercharger: Gear-driven centrifugal type supercharger
Cooling system: Liquid-cooled
Performance
Power output:

1,230 kW (1,650 hp) at 3,200 rpm for takeoff
1,082 kW (1,450 hp) at 3,800 m (12,500 ft)
Specific power: 35.1 kW/L (0.77 hp/in??)
Compression ratio: 6.75:1
Power-to-weight ratio: 1.61 kW/kg (0.98 hp/lb)

Also...

Su-5, I-107

http://avia.russian.ee/pictures/russia/su-5.jpg
The airplane reached so a speed of 807 km/h in 10,000 meters height.

WEIGHTS
Take-off weight 3804 kg
Empty weight 2954 kg
DIMENSIONS
Wingspan 10.56 m
Length 8.51 m
Height 3.53 m
Wing area 17.00 m
PERFORMANCE
Max. speed 810 km/h
Range 600 km

The development at the TsIAM (Central Aero Engine Institute) by K V Kholshchevnikov of the so-called "accelerator", or VRDK (Vozdushno-reaktivny dvigatyel kompressorny, or Air-reaction engine compressor), prompted the development of mixed-power single-seat fighters as an interim means of meeting the potential threat of German turbojet-powered fighters. Both Mikoyan-Gurevich and Sukhoi bureaux were assigned the task of creating such fighters, the former developing the MiG-13 alias I-250(N) and the latter the Su-5 alias I-107. The VRDK provided 300kg thrust for up to 10 min at high altitude to boost the power available from the Klimov M-107A (VK-107A) 12-cylinder Vee-type liquid-cooled engine which delivered 1,650hp for take-off. An all-metal stressed-skin single-seat monoplane with a monocoque fuselage, the Su-5 had an armament of one 23mm engine-mounted cannon and two 12.7mm machine guns. First flown in April 1945, the prototype was soon thereafter fitted with a new wing of laminar-flow type developed by the TsAGI, and during one subsequent flight test a speed of 793km/h was attained at 4350m, this being 25km/h faster than had been calculated for that altitude. The effect of the VRDK was a gain of 90km/h at low altitude rising to 110km/h at 7800m, at which it was anticipated that maximum speed would be 810km/h. Early in July 1945, before this speed could be attained, the M-107A engine suffered some damage in flight and when it was found to be irreparable, the Su-5 flight test programme was abandoned.

Links:
http://tanks45.tripod.com/Jets45/Histories/Su5/Su5.htm
http://avia.russian.ee/air/russia/su-5.html
http://www.ctrl-c.liu.se/misc/RAM/su-5.html<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/woofiedog/X-masWoofie.jpg

Hunter 82's PC component shop
http://www.magnum-pc.com/
https://usm.channelonline.com/magnumpc/storesite/Search/External/

woofiedog
10-12-2006, 02:23 AM
In order to counter the introduction of German turbojet-powered aircraft such as the Me-262, the Soviet Union in 1944 began a crash program to develop a high-performance fighter which resulted in the Mikoyan-Gurevich I-250 (N).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/77/MiG-13.jpg
This mixed powerplant configuration enabled the I-250 to reach a maximum speed of 513 mph (825 km/h), but only for no more, than 10 minutes. Without jet engine working, maximum speed was 677 km/h.

Although the aircraft was largely conventional in layout, it featured a novel propulsion system which consisted of a Klimov VK-107R V-12 piston engine (mounted conventionally and driving a tractor propeller) which was connected, via an extension shaft, to a compressor with seven fuel burners. This produced a propulsive jet which was directed, and accelerated, through a variable rear nozzle (compare thermojet). This mixed powerplant configuration enabled the I-250 to reach a maximum speed of 513 mph (825 km/h), but for no more than 10 minutes. Without the jet engine working, maximum speed was 421 mph (677 km/h). The plane was named I-250 (for istrebitel - fighter), it also bore factory code designation: aircraft N.

The first prototype was flown on March 3, 1945. On July 5, 1945 it crashed due to tail damage, killing its test pilot, Alexander Deyev. Tests continued on the second prototype. At the same time, the first batch of 50 aircraft were ordered. However, the aircraft development met with numerous problems, and it was not ready to pass state evaluation. In the meantime, Soviet designers constructed the first real jet fighters, MiG-9 and Yak-15, which made the I-250 obsolete. Therefore, in early 1947 the VVS cancelled its further development. It was decided to pass the completed planes to the Naval Aviation, but the aircraft did not pass state evaluation, which ended in April 1948.

According to older sources, 50 aircraft were built from late 1945, and served with the Baltic Fleet and some Northern fighter units until 1950 under the designation MiG-13. However, new Russian sources claim that the number of completed planes was lower - possibly only 10-20, and there is no evidence of their service, nor of MiG-13 designation, which might have been an intended name for serial aircraft.

http://avia.russian.ee/pictures/russia/mig-13_1.jpg

Engine: 1x Klimov VK-107A piston engine / 1x Khalshchevnikov VRDK jetbooster
Wing Span: 9.5 m
Length: 8.18 m
Weight: Empty 2,935 kg / Loaded 3,680 kg
Maximum Speed: 825 km/h
Ceiling: 11,900 m
Range: 1,380 km
Crew: 1
Armament: 3x 20mm cannons

Links:
http://www.sergib.agava.ru/russia/mikoyan/i/250/i250_e.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermojet

Klimov VK-107

Klimov VK-107 is a V-12 liquid-cooled piston aircraft engine used by Soviet aircraft during World War II.

VK-107 was a brand-new design having little in common with its predecessors M-105 and VK-106. To achieve a greater power output, each cylinder now had four valves (two intake and two exhaust), crankshaft and camshafts were completely revised, and a new supercharger design was implemented. Although the engine could have been ready for production as early as 1942, Soviet factories lacked the capacity to produce a brand new design. Thus, less powerful VK-105PF and VK-105PF2 were built instead. However, the appearance of Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Me 109 with Daimler-Benz DB 605 engine in 1943 created an urgent demand for a more powerful engine. VK-107A was put into production in 1944 and was used on Yak-9U fighters. The engine was not well liked by either pilots or mechanics -- it had a life expectancy of only 25 hours and war emergency power was almost never used for fear of decreasing this even more. The engine was also difficult to service, in part because exhaust gas collectors were on the inside of the cylinder banks.

Variants

VK-107A - production version
VK-107R - version for hybrid piston-turbojet powered Mikoyan-Gurevich I-250 (N) and Sukhoi Su-5 fighters
VK-108 - attempt to further develop VK-107 with 1,380 kW (1,850 hp) on takeoff, used on several Yakovlev Yak-3 prototypes but did not enter production.

Specifications (VK-107A)
General characteristics
Type: 12-cylinder supercharged liquid-cooled Vee aircraft piston engine
Bore:
Stroke:
Displacement: 35.0 liters (2,135 in??)
Dry weight: 765 kg (1,685 lb)
Components
Valvetrain: Two intake and two exhaust valves per cylinder actuated via an overhead camshaft
Supercharger: Gear-driven centrifugal type supercharger
Cooling system: Liquid-cooled
Performance
Power output:

1,230 kW (1,650 hp) at 3,200 rpm for takeoff
1,082 kW (1,450 hp) at 3,800 m (12,500 ft)
Specific power: 35.1 kW/L (0.77 hp/in??)
Compression ratio: 6.75:1
Power-to-weight ratio: 1.61 kW/kg (0.98 hp/lb)

Also...

Su-5, I-107

http://avia.russian.ee/pictures/russia/su-5.jpg
The airplane reached so a speed of 807 km/h in 10,000 meters height.

WEIGHTS
Take-off weight 3804 kg
Empty weight 2954 kg
DIMENSIONS
Wingspan 10.56 m
Length 8.51 m
Height 3.53 m
Wing area 17.00 m
PERFORMANCE
Max. speed 810 km/h
Range 600 km

The development at the TsIAM (Central Aero Engine Institute) by K V Kholshchevnikov of the so-called "accelerator", or VRDK (Vozdushno-reaktivny dvigatyel kompressorny, or Air-reaction engine compressor), prompted the development of mixed-power single-seat fighters as an interim means of meeting the potential threat of German turbojet-powered fighters. Both Mikoyan-Gurevich and Sukhoi bureaux were assigned the task of creating such fighters, the former developing the MiG-13 alias I-250(N) and the latter the Su-5 alias I-107. The VRDK provided 300kg thrust for up to 10 min at high altitude to boost the power available from the Klimov M-107A (VK-107A) 12-cylinder Vee-type liquid-cooled engine which delivered 1,650hp for take-off. An all-metal stressed-skin single-seat monoplane with a monocoque fuselage, the Su-5 had an armament of one 23mm engine-mounted cannon and two 12.7mm machine guns. First flown in April 1945, the prototype was soon thereafter fitted with a new wing of laminar-flow type developed by the TsAGI, and during one subsequent flight test a speed of 793km/h was attained at 4350m, this being 25km/h faster than had been calculated for that altitude. The effect of the VRDK was a gain of 90km/h at low altitude rising to 110km/h at 7800m, at which it was anticipated that maximum speed would be 810km/h. Early in July 1945, before this speed could be attained, the M-107A engine suffered some damage in flight and when it was found to be irreparable, the Su-5 flight test programme was abandoned.

Links:
http://tanks45.tripod.com/Jets45/Histories/Su5/Su5.htm
http://avia.russian.ee/air/russia/su-5.html
http://www.ctrl-c.liu.se/misc/RAM/su-5.html<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/woofiedog/X-masWoofie.jpg

Hunter 82's PC component shop
http://www.magnum-pc.com/
https://usm.channelonline.com/magnumpc/storesite/Search/External/

major_setback
10-12-2006, 04:21 AM
I give up, what is it?<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y129/major-setback/Signaurepic004BESTframe014small.jpg
<span class="ev_code_PINK">My Aim is True.</span>

DIRTY-MAC
10-12-2006, 12:56 PM
No one?<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Otto may have been a weirdo, but he was a dam good fighterpilot.
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c15/HOOTCHIE-MAMA/ohhbabyfinal.jpg
aka HOOTCHIE MAMA online