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XyZspineZyX
12-19-2004, 12:52 AM
I don't have a LOT of experience with this game yet and I haven't been able to tell how best to handle an engine when it starts running rough (brown smoke).

When you're far from home and want to get as close to friendly territory as possible (or maybe even make it all the way back), is it best to:

1) Run the engine at high a setting as possible so as to cover as much ground as possible before the engine quits?

or

2) Run the engine as gently as possible to maintain altitude so that it lasts as long as possible?

The brown smoke I assume is loss of oil? So this causes the engine to overheat?

I'm thinking that I want to run the engine fast so that I get as much distance out of it as possible before the oil runs out.

Anyone have any pointers on this or insights into how the game handles engine siezure? Does it sieze up faster if it's run harder or is the siezure just a timer thing?

Tully__
12-19-2004, 01:30 AM
I haven't run extensive testing, but I deal with it this way:

If I'm at high altitude I baby the engine and aim for just enough throttle to stay off the ground 'til I'm over friendly territory. Once I'm over friendly territory I maintain enough altitude to bail out (700m +) and try for base. If the engine quits before base I'll land if there's a clear patch or bail.

At low altitude, I gun it (but less than 100%) and hope for a clear spot to land when it quits.

The best option is not to damage the engine in the first place. If you're damaging without getting shot, you're mis-handling engine management and need to run lower throttle or prop pitch settings. The commonest non-guns related causes of engines running rough are overheating or over revving. Also on the list are running supercharger 2nd/3rd stages at lower altitudes and in the German aircraft not having "WEP" engaged before increasing the throttle through 100%.

Fehler
12-19-2004, 01:46 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Tully__:
..commonest.. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

LOL, what is THAT word? LOL

Tully__
12-19-2004, 01:47 AM
variation of "most common".

ColoradoBBQ
12-19-2004, 02:03 AM
If you're suffering from an oil leak, I suggest you drop prop pitch and throttle to a minimium required to glide at high speed, usually 70% to 80%, and coast out of the combat area ASAP. Running the engine at full power would only have it seize up faster and at shorter distance than gliding it back.

WOLFMondo
12-19-2004, 02:19 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Tully__: The commonest non-guns related causes of engines running rough are overheating or over revving. Also on the list are running supercharger 2nd/3rd stages at lower altitudes and in the German aircraft not having "WEP" engaged before increasing the throttle through 100%. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Also making the mixture to high when at to higher altitude will do it. I found in the Ki84, putting the mixture to high, to high up makes the engine go bang.

XyZspineZyX
12-19-2004, 02:56 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ColoradoBBQ:
If you're suffering from an oil leak, I suggest you drop prop pitch and throttle to a minimium required to glide at high speed, usually 70% to 80%, and coast out of the combat area ASAP. Running the engine at full power would only have it seize up faster and at shorter distance than gliding it back. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well, I was thinking that if oil is leaking out, it's better to get as much quick distance with the engine as you can while there is still any oil at all... No?

HotelBushranger
12-19-2004, 04:10 AM
Nah mate....doesnt work that like. Gunning it only gets ya a nice POW camp wall.

Tully__
12-19-2004, 07:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by AgentBif:
Well, I was thinking that if oil is leaking out, it's better to get as much quick distance with the engine as you can while there is still any oil at all... No? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If it's modelled even remotely like the real thing, running the engine at high revs will drive the oil pump at maximum, pumping the oil out a lot quicker. You don't need anything like full power to maintain altitude and running the engine at lower rpm (reducing the prop pitch / governor setting) should make the oil last longer....

Heavy_Weather
12-19-2004, 08:35 AM
when you see brown smoke coming out that usually means your fuel mixture is too rich. cut the mixture to around 80% and it will run better. you only have to do this in some A/C when you're over 5000m.

VW-IceFire
12-19-2004, 08:43 AM
I tend to nurse the engine a bit if I can. Of course, if I'm under fire, I just hit the maximum and try and escape/run the engine into the ground.

If its anything except a German plane, reduce the RPM's through the prop pitch control, reduce the throttle, open the radiator wide, and try and keep the engine as cool as possible.

In the German planes I just reduce the throttle and open the radiator. I figure the RPM controls will take care of themselves...unless the governor is damaged at which point I run it at a minimal pitch setting.

Zeus-cat
12-19-2004, 08:47 AM
I have noticed that in several British planes (notably the Hurricanes), that you can keep a damaged engine running by using prop pitch instead of throttle. The Hurri engine likes to over-rev when damaged in this game and prop pitch keeps it under control much better than throttle. Set the throttle for 50-60% power and listen to your engine constantly. Decrease pitch if it starts to rev too much and increase pitch if it starts to fade. I can baby a Hurri back to base 40-50 km in some cases (OK, usually not, but I have done it). Never tried it in any other planes a they don;t seem to over rev like the Hurris.

Zeus-cat

Tully__
12-19-2004, 08:52 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Zeus-cat:
I have noticed that in several British planes (notably the Hurricanes), that you can keep a damaged engine running by using prop pitch instead of throttle. The Hurri engine likes to over-rev when damaged in this game and prop pitch keeps it under control much better than throttle. Set the throttle for 50-60% power and listen to your engine constantly. Decrease pitch if it starts to rev too much and increase pitch if it starts to fade. I can baby a Hurri back to base 40-50 km in some cases (OK, usually not, but I have done it). Never tried it in any other planes a they don;t seem to over rev like the Hurris.

Zeus-cat <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

This works fine if the only damage is to the automatic propellor governor. I don't think it would get you that far with a coolant or oil loss as well.

Rab03
12-20-2004, 01:21 AM
When it starts to lose oil, you're doomed. Engine will (not ingame) overheat fast and stop. I don't know if babying the engine is modeled in game, but I wonder how much time it would give you. Generally, I run them close to overheating, and when I noice there's no power left - feather the prop. Don't know about He111, but getting home and landing on one engine isn't to hard when you're flying Bf110 or P-38.

Atomic_Marten
12-20-2004, 01:48 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Rab03:
When it starts to lose oil, you're doomed. Engine will (not ingame) overheat fast and stop. I don't know if babying the engine is modeled in game, but I wonder how much time it would give you. Generally, I run them close to overheating, and when I noice there's no power left - feather the prop. Don't know about He111, but getting home and landing on one engine isn't to hard when you're flying Bf110 or P-38. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yup.
I have tried everything (at the time on P40E) -- no good.
It is like car engine without oil; when oil get below certain point, your engine get busted no matter what your sett. are (little red light below speed meter anyone?http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif). And I think there is no counter action to that (power, prop.pitch etc.). Well maybe if you land, fill (repair) the holes, and put some fresh oil in engine from your canister.. argh.http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

Skarphol
12-20-2004, 05:13 AM
Is it really possible to feather the props of the 110 and 111 in this game? How? I've tried, but can't see any change what so ever..

Skarphol

Zeus-cat
12-20-2004, 07:08 AM
So back to the original question - does it do any good to baby the engine in the game if you have an oil leak?

Is this modelled in the game or did Oleg just give you X amount of time for the engine to run after an oil leak? If you have X amount of time regardless of how hard you work the engine, then it makes sense to go to 110% of power and go as fast or climb as high as you can with the time you have left.

Anyone care to test this? It should be easy enough to do. Set up a mission where you take your favorite plane and get behind a bomber. Let him shoot you in the engine and start an oil leak. Baby it. Time how long the engine lasts. Repeat the scenario, but this time go to max power. Compare your times. You may want to repeat each scenario several times to get a good average.

Let us know what you find out.

Zeus-cat

Atomic_Marten
12-20-2004, 08:18 AM
I just vote for X ammount of time. It would be realistic.

The only question is, is the ammount of oil loss modelled in sense that if my engine have bigger hole, more oil I loss, therefore will die more quickly. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

It is certainly worth to test this. But I think it would be somewhat hard. (maybe the easiest way to park on enmy bomber's six, then wait for gunner to 'enable' oil loss on my engine then..). And repeat that 5-10times. Maybe somebody knows better way. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

ZG77_Lignite
12-20-2004, 08:51 AM
Its far from 'easy' to test this, or someone would have done it already. The reason its not easy is the multiple types/levels of engine damage. There are most certainly times when severe engine damage occurs with a very short life remaining, and other times when damage is minimal and it will run for a very long time. It is arguable as to what types of damage are modeled, however I feel their is fuel system, oil system and coolant systems modeled, as well as prop governors and cylinder compression, with varying degrees of severity for each. Thats a lot of variables.

In short, imho, there is no way to know whats best (as it should be), beyond experience and intuition.