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View Full Version : Fastest floatplane of WWII......



Tooz_69GIAP
12-06-2004, 07:34 AM
......waddaya reckon???

http://www.supermarine-spitfire.co.uk/spitfire_floatplane.htm

Daiichidoku
12-06-2004, 09:37 AM
I reckon it makes for beautiful seaside and other secinic marine pics, butwould loathe to see yet another one-off or never seen combat or lowlowlow production type in FB


Dont anyone start asking for a floatplane spit, please, or I will have to counter it with a campaign for Roland Payens beautiful creations....http://home.att.net/~dannysoar2/Payen.htm

RocketDog
12-06-2004, 09:48 AM
The floatplane George must be the fastest "mass-production" floatplane of WWII.

Nice pictures here: http://www.studenten.net/customasp/axl/plane.asp?cat_id=10&ple_id=461&page=0

It looks menacing and purposeful, whereas the floatplane Zero looks silly.

Regards,

RocketDog.

Tooz_69GIAP
12-06-2004, 09:50 AM
Now those are some wacky looking aircraft!! Did they actually fly?? How did they do??

cbazza
12-06-2004, 09:58 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Daiichidoku:
I reckon it makes for beautiful seaside and other secinic marine pics, butwould loathe to see yet another one-off or never seen combat or lowlowlow production type in FB


Dont anyone start asking for a floatplane spit, please, or I will have to counter it with a campaign for Roland Payens beautiful creations....http://home.att.net/~dannysoar2/Payen.htm <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Actually I think I read somewhere that Spitfire floatplanes were active in the eastern Med and even shot down a Luftwaffe patrol aircraft.

This would be good for a possible Med add-on, but I admit not as a very important aircraft - not top of my wish list!

Daiichidoku
12-06-2004, 12:16 PM
Ok, after the Norway campaign started, Air Ministry looked into floatplane fighters, and a meeting was called, including Alan Clifton from Supermarine and Sidney Camm from Hawkers...

One Spit MkI, R 6722 was to beconverted, using floats already at hand, originally meant fo rthe Blackburn Roc....these floats were actually larger tahn needed....but the Norweigan business ended, and the unfinished float convo. was changed back to land plane

In 1942 with Japan at Britain at war, the idea was rehashed, using a Mk V, W3760, using specially made floats made by Arthur Shirvall who did the floats on the Schneider racers, and built by Folland...it had a merlin 45 and a 4 blade prop, volkes-type air filter intake, no armament, and a spin rec paprchute

testing dictated changes in the form of a straight leading edge to the tailplane and incresing its area, and fitting a late-style airfilter intake

in spring 43 Folland convo'd two more Vs, EP 751 and EP 754

In AUG 43, the sole 3 spit Mk V floatplanes were shipped to Egypt on the SS Penrith Castle, arriving there in OCT 43

the plan was to use the spits from an island to cut off german transports to the Dodecanses Islands, guided by a submarine eq with radar and VHF radios...but the germans re-established control of the islands with force, also occupying islands Kos and Leros, cancelling the entire oeration....the MkV floatplane spits never saw any action, spending their days on Great Bitter Lake, in Egypt

in spring 44 Mk IX spit MJ 982 was convo'd to floatplane, flying 18 June fo rthe first time...shorty after that, the whole plan was dropped, the idea at first being to have float spits fo rthe PTO, but sense prevailed


In all, only 5 float spits were ever made, none saw action, and all were converted back into landplanes



The Rex, on the other hand, was a mass produced type, that was eventually converted into land plane, and eventually had its mid wing set low in the George

The interesting thing about the Rex, which was, for a floatplane, very fast and retained good manuverability, and could DF those US types with ease...was the few few prototypes were actually fitted with the production planned contra-rotating prop, making it easier to fly, and for a floatplane, the vital ease to T.O. and landing....not to mention the obvious benefits of no torque in a DF...but technical probs made them drop it


Only the JP made successful floatplane fighters, and in WWI the Brandenburg types from Germany

The post-war Shorts jet fighter never went beyond two prototypes, and AFAIK, only three of the Delta Sea Darts were made, and though sucessful in its own right, the concept finally faded, at least for fighter-types

Tooz_69GIAP
12-06-2004, 01:00 PM
But wouldn't it be so cool to fly a float spit??? C'mon, you know you wanna!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif