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Graf1119
11-29-2006, 07:52 AM
Pappy's Strafers

http://img329.imageshack.us/img329/1019/b25falcon800x600jx4.jpg

"PAPPY" GUNN AND THE B‑25

Roy Lee Grover

Stories of the use of airpower in the Pacific Area during World War II would not be complete without remembering one man who made a major contribution in the use of the B-25. This is what 38th Bombardment Group pilot Roy Lee Grover remembers about "Pappy" and the B-25:

The B‑25 made a major contribution to the successful prosecution of the "War in the Pacific" during World War II. One of the men who contributed greatly or maybe was responsible for enabling the B‑25 to be successful was Paul I. "Pappy" Gunn. I am unable to sift fiction from fact regarding "Pappy" but to us who were in the Pacific and close to the action in the early days of the war, the stories of "Pappy Gunn are true.

"Pappy" Gunn owned and operated an airline in the Philippines before and during the first ;few days after the outbreak of war with Japan. He is reported to have carried out his own war with the Japanese by kicking bombs out of his transports until the Army recalled him as a Major and made his actions legal. (He was an Army flyer before he was an owner and operator of his own airline).

It was "Pappy Gunn who led the B‑25 raid on Manila in the Philippines from a base in Australia in April 1942. The Japanese had occupied many islands including the Philippines at that time. "Pappy" led his flight of B‑25 airplanes to his old commercial landing strips and used the fuel that he had cached there to accomplish this heroic and remarkable feat.

In the summer and fall of 1942, the short range B‑25 medium bomber appeared to have a limited future. It was assumed that when the nearby Japanese bases were taken, the airplane would be of no use because of it's limited range and we, the crews could go home. Certainty wishful thinking of short sighted men living in miserable conditions. At that time, we in New Guinea, were not winning the war. Our aircraft were outnumbered, our raids were small and of limited effectiveness because of fierce opposition and the limited range of our aircraft. The chances of taking the nearby bases held by the Japanese did not look promising. In fact we were in danger of losing our own bases in New Guinea. Each night "Tokyo Rose" (at least that is what we called the girl radio commentator) would identify one of our units by name and by location and sometimes by the name of the unit commander and assure us that our stay in New Guinea would be of limited duration. If we didn't leave, we would soon be dead. There were some people who made plans for evacuation in case they were left to their own means because our position was anything but secure and every one could not get on the available airplanes. It was in this time of less than great enthusiasm for striking the enemy and winning the war that brought "Pappy" Gunn's ingenuity to its sharpest edge. His major concern and objective in life appeared to be "killing the enemy". This was understandable because his wife and children were prisoners in the Philippines.

My first meeting with Lt. Col. Gunn was at first pleasant but that feeling quickly changed. It was shortly after the 38th Bomb Group had moved to New Guinea in the latter part of 1942. Previously we conducted our raids from Australia with refueling at Port Moresby. I ferried a B-25 to Brisbane to have gun mounts installed in the rear side windows of the airplane and to enjoy the hardships of civilization. This was just as the popular 38th Group song would say, "We went down to old Brisbane to hear the P.D. (per diem) boys complain, Hardships Hardships, you don't know what hardships are!" We landed at the Eagle Farms airport, turned our airplane in and were told to come back in 2 days. We quickly took advantage of a hot shower, put on clean cloths and looked for a way to town ‑ town being Brisbane. We were told to get out on the road and "hitch" a ride as there was lots of traffic on the road but no base operated transportation to Brisbane. We followed the advice and in a very short time a staff car left the base and stopped for us. A Lt. Col.. was in the front seat with a driver. The Colonel's only comment was, "Get in". When we had traveled less than a mile, the Colonel asked, "What outfit are you from?" Our answer was one of pride in our unit when we said, "The 38th Bomb Group". The then unknown Colonel said, "Stop the car ‑ get out", then drove off towards Brisbane without 3 shocked 2nd Lieutenants.

Our next encounter with "Pappy" Gunn was two days later when we three 2nd Lieutenants returned to the air base for our airplane and found out that the Lt. Col. in the staff car was "Pappy Gunn" and he was not on good terms with our commander Lt. Col. Brian "Shanty" O'Neal. Col. Gunn walked into Operations as I was filing a clearance for our return trip to New Guinea. He asked for the crew of the 38th Bomb Group B‑25 parked nearest to Operations and due to leave today. He was speaking of our airplane and we identified ourselves. (I use the term "we" because the 38th Bomb Group pilots were mostly of the flying class of 42E with a sprinkling of "old hands" three classes ahead of us and a couple of old men that were of flying classes one or two years before ours. The pilots some times traded places, that is, I was the copilot coming down to Brisbane and was the Pilot for the return trip.) Col. Gunn told us in no uncertain terms that he wanted and expected that airplane, about 2500 pounds of iron gun mounts, 12 mechanics from the 38th Group, their baggage, their tool kits and us off his base by noon. A most unreasonable demand. The airplane could not hold all that was to be moved. Col. Gunn would not listed to anything we had to say. We were assured by base personnel in Operations that what Col. Gunn wanted, Col. Gunn got and we had better "git". With frantic effort, transportation was found for 10 mechanics and their baggage on a C‑47 but no other help was available. That left 2 men, their baggage, 12 tool kits and 2500 pounds of gun mounts in addition of our crew to fit in one B‑25. It was a tight fit, but the aircraft was loaded except that when the last tool boxes were loaded in the back of the airplane the tail started to come down as the nose wheel lifted from the parking ramp. The crew and certainly I knew that the airplane could not hold all that we were trying to load in to it and we certainly could not get off the ground with such a load. To further complicate the problem, repairs were in progress on a hole in the runway so that the last 1000 feet was not available. We were assured that all this "stuff" had to go and that "Pappy" Gunn often flew with a tail heavy airplane. The way he did it was to load the items in the back while the engines were running. It worked, the tail did not go down while the engines were running, but that did not make it right. We were also informed that every one used the reduced length runway with heave loads and we had a good wind to help us. So if "Pappy" can do it, I can do it. I had had enough of "Pappy Gunn and his great capabilities. As I taxied out for take off, the airplane seemed heavy, the runway extremely short, and my position in life most perilous. However, on the bright side, it was a chance to play Jimmy Doolittle. With full throttle, flaps up and cowl flaps cracked open a little, I released the brakes for a Tokyo Raid type take off. However, we did not fly off the runway as expected, we just rolled along. I called for flaps as we approached the break in the runway and pulled the aircraft into the air. We cleared the hole in the runway but the airplane settled back down and I used the last 1000 feet to get airborne again. I had pulled a "Hot Pilot Stunt", not of my own volition but at "Pappy" Gunn's insistence and we lived through it.

One more story of "Pappy" Gunn the man, and then on to his contributions to the war effort with the B‑25. Col. Gunn liked to work on airplanes and was often the "Boss Mechanic" on a repair or modification job. The story is that he broke the little finger of his right hand and had the finger set at the hospital. The finger was held in place with a splint not a cast. However the splint got in the way as Pappy" worked on an engine and he removed it. As a result, his finger healed crooked and got in the way when Col. Gum was handling the throttles of an airplane or tried to put his hand in his pocket. "Pappy" had the finger broken again and reset, again with a splint. Once again the splint got in the way and was removed. Once again the finger healed crooked. He went to the hospital and asked to have the finger removed. The request was refused. The hospital staff would fix his finger but not remove it. So "Pappy Gunn reportedly cut off the finger with his pocket knife and the hospital tidy up the job. It is a fact that the little finger of his right hand was removed.

Now for "Pappy" Gunn's exceptional contributions to the war effort with the B‑25. It was Pappy who put the 4 forward firing 50 caliber machine guns in the bombardier's compartment of B‑25 and 4 fifty caliber machine guns on the sides in two gun packages one each side of the navigators compartment. He first tried using 30 water cooled 30 caliber machine guns in the bomb bay pointing straight downs to strafe troops in their trenches. The vibration peeled the skin or at least loosened the skin around the bomb bay so that project was abandoned. The first packaged gun on the side of the navigators compartment which were belt fed from racks inside, had the ends of the barrels of the guns behind the propellers. Test firings of the guns peeled the skin from the fuselage around the guns, the under wing and the inner portion of the engine nacelles. This problem was solve by using blast tubes to extend the gun blasts ahead of the propellers and no further trouble was encountered. This configuration was first used in low level attacks in the Bismarck Sea Battle with spectacular success. Half of the B‑25's used as low level bombers (called mast‑head bombing and later skip bombing) were already modified with the 8 forward firing guns, needless to say the 38th Group was modified until after the battle. The 38th Group B‑25's had one forward firing flexible gun in the hands of the navigator and one forward firing gun fired by the pilot. The 38th Group had to follow the Beaufighters to have the protection of a strafing pass on their skip bombing runs.

The strafing configuration of the B‑25 made it a formidable weapon with a new least on life, although it was still a relatively short ranged airplane. But "Pappy" Gum fixed that. The lower turret had been remover shortly after we went into combat. It was useless. In the space where the lower turret had been, Pappy put a 150 gallon steel square fuel tank that was hung on a bomb shackle attached to the ceiling. The procedure was to fill the main tanks from this auxiliary tank before reaching the target area and then releasing the auxiliary tank and let it fall away. The procedure worked. The raids on Wewak which weakened the Japanese airpower in New Guinea was the result. It was messy with all the fumes that resulted as the tank tore away from the hose fittings and breezy with a hole in the bottom of the airplane but it was successful and gave the B‑25 the necessary range. The Japanese had not expected the BĀ*25's to reach Wewak. "Pappy" also installed a camera in the tail of the B‑25 connected to an intervalometer to take 4 photos after the bomb bay was closed. This installation produced some of the best strike photos of the war.

One more incident. The strafing configuration with 300 rounds per gun in the nose and in the navigator's compartment put the center of gravity beyond the weight and balance limits of the airplane. "Pappy" Gunn was rumored to have received a wire from Wright Field to the effect that the modification was dangerous with the center of gravity too far forward and that the aircraft should be grounded. "Pappy" was said to have wired back, "Put the center of gravity in storage for the duration, we are fighting a war". Some precautions were necessary. The take off speed was higher. 120 mph in place of 80 or 90 and the speed in turns was increased to 170 in place of 120mph and all was well.

It was "Pappy gun who put the 75 millimeter gun in the nose of a B‑25. He took the newly modified cannon ship on a raid against shipping with his old group, the 3rd Bomb Group and had a successful day. He hit the fire control unit on a destroyer with a shot from the 75 mm so that the destroyer's guns worked individually and ineffectively. Then he sank the destroyer with a 1,000 pound bomb. He insisted in all official proclamations that he had sunk a destroyer with a 75mm. In a way, he had. That incident sold the "G" model for the B‑25.

The "G" was a special purpose weapon. It was good for use against small boats, barge traffic, buildings and such. One could consistently put 3 or 4 rounds in an six foot circle during a 4000 yard run using an inexperienced navigator as loader. The gun was manually loaded and in a rocking airplane that was some task

"Pappy" put a 75mm in a P‑38 and all his test pilots disappeared. Fortunately, he test fired the gun on the ground and found that the P‑38 could not take the recoil. A B‑25 lost about 5 miles per hour momentarily when the gun is fired and if you opened the side window and put your arm on the ledge, the flash would singe the hair on your arm. I tried it several times to show other pilots the effect of the flash.

A B‑25G had a more limited use than a strafer because you had to fire at a greater distance from the target. In a strafing run, you were to present a three dimensional target to the enemy until you pointed your nose at the target and start firing. At that point, you had to be able to out shoot the target. In a strafer you could because no target had a cluster of 8 fifty caliber machine guns but the B‑25. With a 75mm, when you started to fire you were at the proper range for the guns of a destroyer. The ship had more guns for a straight in no deflection shot than your one gun airplane. The G model was a special purpose weapon that had to be used against target it could handle.

The B‑25 strafers destroyed sea traffic, stopped barge supply traffic, and destroyed a large segment of the Japanese airplanes on the ground during the time I was acquainted with the airplane. It was a loser in the pacific that turned into a great success through the ingenuity of "Pappy" Gunn and diligence of many others.

1600x1200 here. (http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/4879/b25falcon1600x1200gb1.jpg)

1280x960 here. (http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/9550/b25falcon1280x960rm5.jpg)<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img197.imageshack.us/img197/4094/grafssasig4pc.jpg
"Against twenty Russians trying to shoot you down or even twenty Spitfires,
it can be exciting, even fun. But curve in towards forty Fortresses and all
your past sins flash before your eyes."
-"Fips" Phillips, 200+ Experten

Graf1119
11-29-2006, 07:52 AM
Pappy's Strafers

http://img329.imageshack.us/img329/1019/b25falcon800x600jx4.jpg

"PAPPY" GUNN AND THE B‑25

Roy Lee Grover

Stories of the use of airpower in the Pacific Area during World War II would not be complete without remembering one man who made a major contribution in the use of the B-25. This is what 38th Bombardment Group pilot Roy Lee Grover remembers about "Pappy" and the B-25:

The B‑25 made a major contribution to the successful prosecution of the "War in the Pacific" during World War II. One of the men who contributed greatly or maybe was responsible for enabling the B‑25 to be successful was Paul I. "Pappy" Gunn. I am unable to sift fiction from fact regarding "Pappy" but to us who were in the Pacific and close to the action in the early days of the war, the stories of "Pappy Gunn are true.

"Pappy" Gunn owned and operated an airline in the Philippines before and during the first ;few days after the outbreak of war with Japan. He is reported to have carried out his own war with the Japanese by kicking bombs out of his transports until the Army recalled him as a Major and made his actions legal. (He was an Army flyer before he was an owner and operator of his own airline).

It was "Pappy Gunn who led the B‑25 raid on Manila in the Philippines from a base in Australia in April 1942. The Japanese had occupied many islands including the Philippines at that time. "Pappy" led his flight of B‑25 airplanes to his old commercial landing strips and used the fuel that he had cached there to accomplish this heroic and remarkable feat.

In the summer and fall of 1942, the short range B‑25 medium bomber appeared to have a limited future. It was assumed that when the nearby Japanese bases were taken, the airplane would be of no use because of it's limited range and we, the crews could go home. Certainty wishful thinking of short sighted men living in miserable conditions. At that time, we in New Guinea, were not winning the war. Our aircraft were outnumbered, our raids were small and of limited effectiveness because of fierce opposition and the limited range of our aircraft. The chances of taking the nearby bases held by the Japanese did not look promising. In fact we were in danger of losing our own bases in New Guinea. Each night "Tokyo Rose" (at least that is what we called the girl radio commentator) would identify one of our units by name and by location and sometimes by the name of the unit commander and assure us that our stay in New Guinea would be of limited duration. If we didn't leave, we would soon be dead. There were some people who made plans for evacuation in case they were left to their own means because our position was anything but secure and every one could not get on the available airplanes. It was in this time of less than great enthusiasm for striking the enemy and winning the war that brought "Pappy" Gunn's ingenuity to its sharpest edge. His major concern and objective in life appeared to be "killing the enemy". This was understandable because his wife and children were prisoners in the Philippines.

My first meeting with Lt. Col. Gunn was at first pleasant but that feeling quickly changed. It was shortly after the 38th Bomb Group had moved to New Guinea in the latter part of 1942. Previously we conducted our raids from Australia with refueling at Port Moresby. I ferried a B-25 to Brisbane to have gun mounts installed in the rear side windows of the airplane and to enjoy the hardships of civilization. This was just as the popular 38th Group song would say, "We went down to old Brisbane to hear the P.D. (per diem) boys complain, Hardships Hardships, you don't know what hardships are!" We landed at the Eagle Farms airport, turned our airplane in and were told to come back in 2 days. We quickly took advantage of a hot shower, put on clean cloths and looked for a way to town ‑ town being Brisbane. We were told to get out on the road and "hitch" a ride as there was lots of traffic on the road but no base operated transportation to Brisbane. We followed the advice and in a very short time a staff car left the base and stopped for us. A Lt. Col.. was in the front seat with a driver. The Colonel's only comment was, "Get in". When we had traveled less than a mile, the Colonel asked, "What outfit are you from?" Our answer was one of pride in our unit when we said, "The 38th Bomb Group". The then unknown Colonel said, "Stop the car ‑ get out", then drove off towards Brisbane without 3 shocked 2nd Lieutenants.

Our next encounter with "Pappy" Gunn was two days later when we three 2nd Lieutenants returned to the air base for our airplane and found out that the Lt. Col. in the staff car was "Pappy Gunn" and he was not on good terms with our commander Lt. Col. Brian "Shanty" O'Neal. Col. Gunn walked into Operations as I was filing a clearance for our return trip to New Guinea. He asked for the crew of the 38th Bomb Group B‑25 parked nearest to Operations and due to leave today. He was speaking of our airplane and we identified ourselves. (I use the term "we" because the 38th Bomb Group pilots were mostly of the flying class of 42E with a sprinkling of "old hands" three classes ahead of us and a couple of old men that were of flying classes one or two years before ours. The pilots some times traded places, that is, I was the copilot coming down to Brisbane and was the Pilot for the return trip.) Col. Gunn told us in no uncertain terms that he wanted and expected that airplane, about 2500 pounds of iron gun mounts, 12 mechanics from the 38th Group, their baggage, their tool kits and us off his base by noon. A most unreasonable demand. The airplane could not hold all that was to be moved. Col. Gunn would not listed to anything we had to say. We were assured by base personnel in Operations that what Col. Gunn wanted, Col. Gunn got and we had better "git". With frantic effort, transportation was found for 10 mechanics and their baggage on a C‑47 but no other help was available. That left 2 men, their baggage, 12 tool kits and 2500 pounds of gun mounts in addition of our crew to fit in one B‑25. It was a tight fit, but the aircraft was loaded except that when the last tool boxes were loaded in the back of the airplane the tail started to come down as the nose wheel lifted from the parking ramp. The crew and certainly I knew that the airplane could not hold all that we were trying to load in to it and we certainly could not get off the ground with such a load. To further complicate the problem, repairs were in progress on a hole in the runway so that the last 1000 feet was not available. We were assured that all this "stuff" had to go and that "Pappy" Gunn often flew with a tail heavy airplane. The way he did it was to load the items in the back while the engines were running. It worked, the tail did not go down while the engines were running, but that did not make it right. We were also informed that every one used the reduced length runway with heave loads and we had a good wind to help us. So if "Pappy" can do it, I can do it. I had had enough of "Pappy Gunn and his great capabilities. As I taxied out for take off, the airplane seemed heavy, the runway extremely short, and my position in life most perilous. However, on the bright side, it was a chance to play Jimmy Doolittle. With full throttle, flaps up and cowl flaps cracked open a little, I released the brakes for a Tokyo Raid type take off. However, we did not fly off the runway as expected, we just rolled along. I called for flaps as we approached the break in the runway and pulled the aircraft into the air. We cleared the hole in the runway but the airplane settled back down and I used the last 1000 feet to get airborne again. I had pulled a "Hot Pilot Stunt", not of my own volition but at "Pappy" Gunn's insistence and we lived through it.

One more story of "Pappy" Gunn the man, and then on to his contributions to the war effort with the B‑25. Col. Gunn liked to work on airplanes and was often the "Boss Mechanic" on a repair or modification job. The story is that he broke the little finger of his right hand and had the finger set at the hospital. The finger was held in place with a splint not a cast. However the splint got in the way as Pappy" worked on an engine and he removed it. As a result, his finger healed crooked and got in the way when Col. Gum was handling the throttles of an airplane or tried to put his hand in his pocket. "Pappy" had the finger broken again and reset, again with a splint. Once again the splint got in the way and was removed. Once again the finger healed crooked. He went to the hospital and asked to have the finger removed. The request was refused. The hospital staff would fix his finger but not remove it. So "Pappy Gunn reportedly cut off the finger with his pocket knife and the hospital tidy up the job. It is a fact that the little finger of his right hand was removed.

Now for "Pappy" Gunn's exceptional contributions to the war effort with the B‑25. It was Pappy who put the 4 forward firing 50 caliber machine guns in the bombardier's compartment of B‑25 and 4 fifty caliber machine guns on the sides in two gun packages one each side of the navigators compartment. He first tried using 30 water cooled 30 caliber machine guns in the bomb bay pointing straight downs to strafe troops in their trenches. The vibration peeled the skin or at least loosened the skin around the bomb bay so that project was abandoned. The first packaged gun on the side of the navigators compartment which were belt fed from racks inside, had the ends of the barrels of the guns behind the propellers. Test firings of the guns peeled the skin from the fuselage around the guns, the under wing and the inner portion of the engine nacelles. This problem was solve by using blast tubes to extend the gun blasts ahead of the propellers and no further trouble was encountered. This configuration was first used in low level attacks in the Bismarck Sea Battle with spectacular success. Half of the B‑25's used as low level bombers (called mast‑head bombing and later skip bombing) were already modified with the 8 forward firing guns, needless to say the 38th Group was modified until after the battle. The 38th Group B‑25's had one forward firing flexible gun in the hands of the navigator and one forward firing gun fired by the pilot. The 38th Group had to follow the Beaufighters to have the protection of a strafing pass on their skip bombing runs.

The strafing configuration of the B‑25 made it a formidable weapon with a new least on life, although it was still a relatively short ranged airplane. But "Pappy" Gum fixed that. The lower turret had been remover shortly after we went into combat. It was useless. In the space where the lower turret had been, Pappy put a 150 gallon steel square fuel tank that was hung on a bomb shackle attached to the ceiling. The procedure was to fill the main tanks from this auxiliary tank before reaching the target area and then releasing the auxiliary tank and let it fall away. The procedure worked. The raids on Wewak which weakened the Japanese airpower in New Guinea was the result. It was messy with all the fumes that resulted as the tank tore away from the hose fittings and breezy with a hole in the bottom of the airplane but it was successful and gave the B‑25 the necessary range. The Japanese had not expected the BĀ*25's to reach Wewak. "Pappy" also installed a camera in the tail of the B‑25 connected to an intervalometer to take 4 photos after the bomb bay was closed. This installation produced some of the best strike photos of the war.

One more incident. The strafing configuration with 300 rounds per gun in the nose and in the navigator's compartment put the center of gravity beyond the weight and balance limits of the airplane. "Pappy" Gunn was rumored to have received a wire from Wright Field to the effect that the modification was dangerous with the center of gravity too far forward and that the aircraft should be grounded. "Pappy" was said to have wired back, "Put the center of gravity in storage for the duration, we are fighting a war". Some precautions were necessary. The take off speed was higher. 120 mph in place of 80 or 90 and the speed in turns was increased to 170 in place of 120mph and all was well.

It was "Pappy gun who put the 75 millimeter gun in the nose of a B‑25. He took the newly modified cannon ship on a raid against shipping with his old group, the 3rd Bomb Group and had a successful day. He hit the fire control unit on a destroyer with a shot from the 75 mm so that the destroyer's guns worked individually and ineffectively. Then he sank the destroyer with a 1,000 pound bomb. He insisted in all official proclamations that he had sunk a destroyer with a 75mm. In a way, he had. That incident sold the "G" model for the B‑25.

The "G" was a special purpose weapon. It was good for use against small boats, barge traffic, buildings and such. One could consistently put 3 or 4 rounds in an six foot circle during a 4000 yard run using an inexperienced navigator as loader. The gun was manually loaded and in a rocking airplane that was some task

"Pappy" put a 75mm in a P‑38 and all his test pilots disappeared. Fortunately, he test fired the gun on the ground and found that the P‑38 could not take the recoil. A B‑25 lost about 5 miles per hour momentarily when the gun is fired and if you opened the side window and put your arm on the ledge, the flash would singe the hair on your arm. I tried it several times to show other pilots the effect of the flash.

A B‑25G had a more limited use than a strafer because you had to fire at a greater distance from the target. In a strafing run, you were to present a three dimensional target to the enemy until you pointed your nose at the target and start firing. At that point, you had to be able to out shoot the target. In a strafer you could because no target had a cluster of 8 fifty caliber machine guns but the B‑25. With a 75mm, when you started to fire you were at the proper range for the guns of a destroyer. The ship had more guns for a straight in no deflection shot than your one gun airplane. The G model was a special purpose weapon that had to be used against target it could handle.

The B‑25 strafers destroyed sea traffic, stopped barge supply traffic, and destroyed a large segment of the Japanese airplanes on the ground during the time I was acquainted with the airplane. It was a loser in the pacific that turned into a great success through the ingenuity of "Pappy" Gunn and diligence of many others.

1600x1200 here. (http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/4879/b25falcon1600x1200gb1.jpg)

1280x960 here. (http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/9550/b25falcon1280x960rm5.jpg)<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img197.imageshack.us/img197/4094/grafssasig4pc.jpg
"Against twenty Russians trying to shoot you down or even twenty Spitfires,
it can be exciting, even fun. But curve in towards forty Fortresses and all
your past sins flash before your eyes."
-"Fips" Phillips, 200+ Experten

mllaneza
11-29-2006, 01:05 PM
I need to steal an "I approve of this post" graphic.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Veteran - Bermuda Triangle Expeditionary Force. 1993-1951.

-HH-Quazi
11-29-2006, 01:15 PM
Thanks for sharing m8. Great read. Seems he was a hard-nosed SOB. If it had been me he kicked out of the car, I'd probably wound up arrested when he tried to order me to move a bunch of mechanics and parts to another base.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

<center>http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v289/HH_Beebop/Personal/HHLoGo3.jpg

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