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View Full Version : Duralumin or Delta Wood? Try Plymax instead



JR_Greenhorn
03-03-2005, 06:37 PM
I was researching the Hispano-Suiza 12Y, and I ran across this site (http://www.sciencedaily.com/encyclopedia/morane_saulnier_m_s_406#M.S.410).

On their M.S.406 page they mention "Plymax" as an aircraft construction material. Now, I had never heard of this, and I find these early French aircraft interesting, so I thought I would share.



The M.S.405 (a pre-production version of the M.S.406) is described as a "low-wing monoplane of mixed construction, with fabric covered wood tail, but a bonded metal/wood material (Plymax) fixed to duralumin tubing. Plymax consisted of a thin sheet of duralumin bonded to a thicker sheet of plywood."
The plane was in development from 1934-1935.
When did the Soviets start using Delta Wood construction for their fighters?

Does anyone know more about Plymax? Did the wood side go on the interior or the exterior? What kind of wood would they have used?

Obviously Plymax was used for skinning, and wasn't structural like Delta Wood. I suspect the wood was used to increase the allowable stress of the panel with a minimal increase in weight, compared to a thicker sheet of Duralumin. I also wonder how it held up to damage from MGs and cannons.

JR_Greenhorn
03-03-2005, 06:37 PM
I was researching the Hispano-Suiza 12Y, and I ran across this site (http://www.sciencedaily.com/encyclopedia/morane_saulnier_m_s_406#M.S.410).

On their M.S.406 page they mention "Plymax" as an aircraft construction material. Now, I had never heard of this, and I find these early French aircraft interesting, so I thought I would share.



The M.S.405 (a pre-production version of the M.S.406) is described as a "low-wing monoplane of mixed construction, with fabric covered wood tail, but a bonded metal/wood material (Plymax) fixed to duralumin tubing. Plymax consisted of a thin sheet of duralumin bonded to a thicker sheet of plywood."
The plane was in development from 1934-1935.
When did the Soviets start using Delta Wood construction for their fighters?

Does anyone know more about Plymax? Did the wood side go on the interior or the exterior? What kind of wood would they have used?

Obviously Plymax was used for skinning, and wasn't structural like Delta Wood. I suspect the wood was used to increase the allowable stress of the panel with a minimal increase in weight, compared to a thicker sheet of Duralumin. I also wonder how it held up to damage from MGs and cannons.

triggerhappyfin
03-04-2005, 07:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by JR_Greenhorn:
I was researching the Hispano-Suiza 12Y, and I ran across http://www.sciencedaily.com/encyclopedia/morane_saulnier_m_s_406#M.S.410.

On their M.S.406 page they mention "Plymax" as an aircraft construction material. Now, I had never heard of this, and I find these early French aircraft interesting, so I thought I would share.



The M.S.405 (a pre-production version of the M.S.406) is described as a "low-wing monoplane of mixed construction, with fabric covered wood tail, but a bonded metal/wood material (Plymax) fixed to duralumin tubing. Plymax consisted of a thin sheet of duralumin bonded to a thicker sheet of plywood."
The plane was in development from 1934-1935.
When did the Soviets start using Delta Wood construction for their fighters?

Does anyone know more about Plymax? Did the wood side go on the interior or the exterior? What kind of wood would they have used?

Obviously Plymax was used for skinning, and wasn't structural like Delta Wood. I suspect the wood was used to increase the allowable stress of the panel with a minimal increase in weight, compared to a thicker sheet of Duralumin. I also wonder how it held up to damage from MGs and cannons. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Nice finding!

There is this missunderstanding about deltawood and damage from gun fire! It is´nt bulletproof!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/354.gif
Deltawood as Oleg calls it is not a material it´s a buildingmethod. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif It can be made by layering wooden veneers with some resin, much alike a plywood sheet, ower some forming mold.
It can also be made as strip planking, nailing strips of wood(in layers)together with use of resin to bond it together. This method giving a hull with no need of any superstuctures and able to take it owne loads.
Therefore a major damage is required to make a such hull to collapse. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Plymax souds like a great skinning material but no replacement for 'deltawood'. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif