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MrBlueSky1960
07-05-2006, 10:48 AM
By Raymond L. Rimler

This new title will include over one hundred genuine colour photographs of the men and machines of the Royal Flying Corps, in action on the Western Front in early 1918.
A previously unknown collection of glass plate images was recently discovered, during the cataloging of the British archives of the photographic company Eastman Kodak. According to documents that were found with these photographs, Kodak had been working during the First World War on a pioneering chemical process, to capture colour images on the conventional glass plate negatives of the time.
The War Department in Whitehall where interested in the potential of this process, for better aerial reconnaissance of the German trenches and forward positions. Accordingly, Stanley West, a civilian employee of Eastman Kodak, was seconded to No.16 Squadron, RFC, in France in early 1918. There, he flew as an observer on several missions over the front and took a series of colour photographs of the trench system in the area. West also took many pictures of the R.E.8 aircraft he flew in, the fighters that escorted him, and of visiting RFC aircraft from other units. The War Department was disappointed with the results of the trial and abandoned its support, leaving the development of colour photography to languish for another decade.
Although faded by age, these remarkable images have now been computer enhanced, to present a stunning new glimpse into the world of 1918.
One unusual sequence of photographs deserves particular mention. During a reconnaissance mission over enemy lines, West's aircraft was suddenly attacked by an all-red Fokker Triplane. The lumbering R.E.8 aircraft was no match for the German fighter, but amazingly the German's guns jammed and he was unable to complete the kill. The German pilot then flew alongside the British crew and saluted them, before diving away. West recorded the attack and flyby with his camera. Only a few weeks later, the Red Baron met his death.
This title will be a major publishing event for 2007, and an essential reference source for all World War One aviation enthusiasts and historians. Captions are written by the well known aviation historian Ray Rimler.

Publication date is 01/04/2007. Price 19.95.

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MrBlueSky1960
07-05-2006, 10:48 AM
By Raymond L. Rimler

This new title will include over one hundred genuine colour photographs of the men and machines of the Royal Flying Corps, in action on the Western Front in early 1918.
A previously unknown collection of glass plate images was recently discovered, during the cataloging of the British archives of the photographic company Eastman Kodak. According to documents that were found with these photographs, Kodak had been working during the First World War on a pioneering chemical process, to capture colour images on the conventional glass plate negatives of the time.
The War Department in Whitehall where interested in the potential of this process, for better aerial reconnaissance of the German trenches and forward positions. Accordingly, Stanley West, a civilian employee of Eastman Kodak, was seconded to No.16 Squadron, RFC, in France in early 1918. There, he flew as an observer on several missions over the front and took a series of colour photographs of the trench system in the area. West also took many pictures of the R.E.8 aircraft he flew in, the fighters that escorted him, and of visiting RFC aircraft from other units. The War Department was disappointed with the results of the trial and abandoned its support, leaving the development of colour photography to languish for another decade.
Although faded by age, these remarkable images have now been computer enhanced, to present a stunning new glimpse into the world of 1918.
One unusual sequence of photographs deserves particular mention. During a reconnaissance mission over enemy lines, West's aircraft was suddenly attacked by an all-red Fokker Triplane. The lumbering R.E.8 aircraft was no match for the German fighter, but amazingly the German's guns jammed and he was unable to complete the kill. The German pilot then flew alongside the British crew and saluted them, before diving away. West recorded the attack and flyby with his camera. Only a few weeks later, the Red Baron met his death.
This title will be a major publishing event for 2007, and an essential reference source for all World War One aviation enthusiasts and historians. Captions are written by the well known aviation historian Ray Rimler.

Publication date is 01/04/2007. Price 19.95.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

FoolTrottel
07-05-2006, 01:34 PM
Thank you!
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gifCould you please bump this thread by then as a reminder?

MB_Avro_UK
07-05-2006, 05:06 PM
hi all,

My brother is employed as a researcher within the Imperial War Museum,Lambeth,London,Great Britain. http://www.iwm.org.uk/server/show/nav.00100m003

I have spoken to him about this finding and in his opinion it is not isolated. His staff are examining similar quality footage of the Battle of Jutland.

They are also engaged in studying the first non-stop crossing of the Atlantic by two British pilots in a Vickers Vimy Bomber in 1919. (Great pics of Alcock and Brown).

From preliminary comparisons,it appears that the so called 'Red Baron's' plane was not a vivid Red but closer to a 'yellowish-pink'.

I'll post pics as soon as they are available.

Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

sc1949
07-05-2006, 06:44 PM
Yellowish-pink Baron doesn't have the right ring to it, does it?.

jamesdietz
07-05-2006, 07:09 PM
Cawn't wait!

wayno7777
07-05-2006, 08:29 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/351.gif

leitmotiv
07-05-2006, 11:42 PM
Please keep us informed of any images pertaining to Jutland, MB_Avro_UK!!!! WWI aero Eastman book looks great---definite buy.