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woofiedog
04-18-2007, 11:27 PM
http://www.cv6.org/images/arima.jpg
Imperial Japanese Navy pilot Lieutenant Keiichi Arima in his flight suit in early 1941.

As a Lieutenant in the Imperial Japanese Navy, Keiichi Arima witnessed Enterprise history from a vantage point which no man in her own crew could ever experience: the cockpit of an enemy plane in an attack against the carrier.

Mr. Arima, who advanced to Lieutenant Commander in October 1944, flew in two separate attacks against Enterprise, first on 24 August 1942, at the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, and again on 26 October 1942, at the Battle of Santa Cruz. At the Eastern Solomons, his plane scored the first direct hit ever on Enterprise. And at Santa Cruz, his plane landed the first hit on the carrier in that battle. His skill and tenacity was typical of the powerful enemy that Enterprise faced in 1942.


Link: http://www.cv6.org/company/accounts/arima/default.htm

woofiedog
04-18-2007, 11:27 PM
http://www.cv6.org/images/arima.jpg
Imperial Japanese Navy pilot Lieutenant Keiichi Arima in his flight suit in early 1941.

As a Lieutenant in the Imperial Japanese Navy, Keiichi Arima witnessed Enterprise history from a vantage point which no man in her own crew could ever experience: the cockpit of an enemy plane in an attack against the carrier.

Mr. Arima, who advanced to Lieutenant Commander in October 1944, flew in two separate attacks against Enterprise, first on 24 August 1942, at the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, and again on 26 October 1942, at the Battle of Santa Cruz. At the Eastern Solomons, his plane scored the first direct hit ever on Enterprise. And at Santa Cruz, his plane landed the first hit on the carrier in that battle. His skill and tenacity was typical of the powerful enemy that Enterprise faced in 1942.


Link: http://www.cv6.org/company/accounts/arima/default.htm

LEXX_Luthor
04-18-2007, 11:40 PM
Thanks! These are always interesting to read.

What is a ring formation?

leitmotiv
04-19-2007, 12:52 AM
Not many Japanese strike pilots returned from raids on USN carriers---to do so twice in a D3A1 was definitely incredible. To hit the ENTERPRISE twice is mathematically impossible---but he did it!!!!

A ring formation is a circular formation of escort ships around an aircraft carrier. The idea was that from whichever angle attackers used they would have to pass through the fire arcs of escorts to get to the carriers. In 1942, American carriers maneuvered within the ring to avoid dive bombers and torpedo bombers, and the escorts tried to keep up as best they could. Starting in 1943, carriers and their escorts all maneuvered simultaneously together in order to keep formation and maintain the best firing arcs.

Blutarski2004
04-19-2007, 05:53 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by leitmotiv:
Not many Japanese strike pilots returned from raids on USN carriers---to do so twice in a D3A1 was definitely incredible. To hit the ENTERPRISE twice is mathematically impossible.

A ring formation is a circular formation of escort ships around an aircraft carrier. The idea was that from whichever angle attackers used they would have to pass through the fire arcs of escorts to get to the carriers. In 1942, American carriers maneuvered within the ring to avoid dive bombers and torpedo bombers, and the escorts tried to keep up as best they could. Starting in 1943, carriers and their escorts all maneuvered simultaneously together in order to keep formation and maintain the best firing arcs. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


..... See the book "Shattered Sword" for a good description of carrier TF anti-air formations, circa 1942. The IJN had a VERY different approach to the problem. The radical difference in the USN and IJN tactical solutions was quite vivid. It is a good example of how oe problem can produce two very different conceptual solutions.

woofiedog
04-19-2007, 06:15 AM
Also another interview...

Interrogation of: Captain AMAGI, Takahisa, IJN, Naval Aviator, Air Commander (observer) on CV Hiryu at PEARL HARBOR, Air Officer on CV Kaga at Battle of MIDWAY, 3, 4, 5 June 42.

AMAGI, Takahisa, Captain, I.J.N. Nav. No. 1


AMAGI served 21 years in the regular Navy and was a pilot of 2,500 hours experience. He was Air Officer on the Hiryu (CV) at PEARL HARBOR and later Air Officer on the Kaga (CV) at the Battle of MIDWAY, 4-6 June 1942. Following the sinking of Kaga, he served as a member of the Naval Air Service Headquarters Staff where he was in charge of aircraft carrier flight deck installations. From May 1944 until the end of the war he served as Commanding Officer of the 634th Air Group.

He was the first Japanese Naval Officer interrogated by this group following the surrender of Japan. As such he was reticent to volunteer information but answered direct questions without hesitation. His statements were confirmed by subsequent interrogations.

Air Officer, Hiryu (CV) First Air Fleet 1941-1942
Air Officer, Kaga (CV) First Air Fleet 1942
Staff, Naval Air Service Hdqs. TOKYO 1942-1944
Commanding Officer, 634th Air Group 1944-1945



Link: http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/AAF/USSBS/IJO/IJO-1.html

Q. How many protective fighters (CAP) were over carrier formation?
A. Normally 28. Two carriers supplied eight each, the other two carriers provided six each. This was normal patrol. If attacked, other planes rose to meet opposition.

Q. How long did fighters stay in air, and how were planes in air relieved? ,br&gt; A. Two hours. When the waiting planes get in air up high, then the former patrolling plane comes down and lands.

Q. When the carrier launched the patrol did it turn into the wind alone, or did all ships turn?
A. All turn in same formation. We use 14 meters wind over deck for landing and launching. If only few planes launched individual carrier turns into wind. if many planes launched or landed entire formation turns. When over 300 miles from target, carriers operate independently. When within 300 miles of target, all ships maneuver together.

Q. About how far apart were the ships in the formation?
A. A square formation about 4000 meters apart. When need much speed and wind, distance large. When wind and sea strong, the distance diminishes.

Q. Did the formation zigzag?
A. Yes.

Q. Were destroyers employed with the carriers when operating the planes?
A. Yes, sometimes, one, sometimes two destroyers would come from outside circular screen. They take station about 700 meters astern.

-HH- Beebop
04-19-2007, 06:23 AM
Good stuff woofiedog. The Japanese naval formation info is good information for mission builders.

Thanks. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

leitmotiv
04-19-2007, 06:35 AM
http://www.eyeinthesky.com.au/esp/ac_library/vals_stormy.jpg

woofiedog
04-19-2007, 06:52 AM
Glad you all have enjoyed the articles...

A little more info on the Carrier Formations.

Aircraft Carrier Tactics of World War II Link: http://johnsmilitaryhistory.com/carriertactics.html

In 1942, carrier forces were split so that each carrier was escorted by approximately two cruisers and three destroyers. (Wukovits 39) These escorts surrounded the carrier at a distance in a circular "wagon wheel" formation. If the force needed to change direction, each ship would turn to the proper heading, maintaining the circular formation. This screen of escorts protected the valuable carrier with anti-aircraft fire. It would also fight off any surface ships which reached the task force and protect the carrier from submarine attack. (Hughes 88-90) The ships were manufactured so that their speeds were roughly comparable, and a carrier group could travel at about 30 knots.

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g270000/g278815.jpg
Maneuvering off the coast of Japan, 17 August 1945, two days after Japan agreed to surrender.
Taken by a USS Shangri-La (CV-38) photographer.
The aircraft carrier in lower right is USS Wasp (CV-18). Also present in the formation are five other Essex class carriers, four light carriers, at least three battleships, plus several cruisers and destroyers.

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g420000/g427931.jpg

U.S. Third Fleet
Steams in formation outside of Tokyo Bay, Japan, in August 1945, shortly after the Japanese government had accepted Allied surrender terms.

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g410000/g415309.jpg

And one more... I believe that Uber Demon helped with this one! LoL

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g490000/g490379.jpg
U.S. Third Fleet carrier planes fly in massed formation over the fleet's ships, as it awaited orders to move into Japanese ports, 23 August 1945.
More than a thousand aircraft participated in the flyover. The ships were operating within a few hours' steaming time of the Japanese coast.
Over 260 aircraft can bee seen in this image, including F6F, F4U, TBM and SB2C types.

leitmotiv
04-19-2007, 06:54 AM
A couple of classic images of USN anti-aircraft defense circa-October 1942, Santa Cruz, ENTERPRISE task force with the bristling SOUTH DAKOTA attempting to ride herd on the squirming carrier. Note the disorganized formation in the top photo with ENT (left), a destroyer headed in the opposite direction from ENT and SODAK (center), and SODAK shooting AA (right):

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g20000/g20989.jpg

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g30000/g30198.jpg

This battle saw the first use of the 40mm Bofors in the USN, and saw the disastrous attrition of the last of the Japanese first team, including their torpedo bombing expert, Murata.

leitmotiv
04-19-2007, 07:00 AM
Great formation shots WD!!!!

LEXX_Luthor
04-19-2007, 09:30 PM
Ring formation. Thanks leit.

THANKS Woofie I have to bookmark this link ~&gt; http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/AAF/USSBS/IJO/IJO-Bio.html

That page is the list of all interviewed people. The interviews are listed as clickable numbers to the right. Some give 404 ERROR not found, some don't and they are a great read.

woofiedog
04-19-2007, 10:46 PM
LEXX_Luthor... Yes indeed... these interviews will make for some Excellent rainy day reading. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USMC/USMC-C-Aces/img/USMC-C-Aces-17.jpg

Link: http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USMC/USMC-C-Aces/index.html