PDA

View Full Version : Was the repeater compass historical accurate?



Haigotron
04-19-2006, 01:03 PM
well is it?

I just discovered its true purpose, did they really have such a thing that could point towards one waypoint, then once you're there, itll point to the other waypoint?

UNFATHOMABLE!...well ok not really..but need more insight http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Haigotron
04-19-2006, 01:03 PM
well is it?

I just discovered its true purpose, did they really have such a thing that could point towards one waypoint, then once you're there, itll point to the other waypoint?

UNFATHOMABLE!...well ok not really..but need more insight http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

ColoradoBBQ
04-19-2006, 02:48 PM
Radio navigation did exist in WW2 Bombers usually use them to navigate during the night with triangulation marking the spot where they should drop the bombs.

Jungmann
04-19-2006, 03:17 PM
No. The closest thing in WWII to the instrument on our panels was the radio compass. The compass dial was the readout of a radio on board that could receive distant low-frequency signals, either from beacons or commercial radio stations. The bearing to that signal was displayed on the compass rose. The pilot could either steer towards the signal on that bearing, if he wanted to reach the source of the signal, or he could plot the bearing of the signal across his course on his chart, and then take one or more other bearings from other radio signals nearby and plot them out also. Where they crossed on his chart was pretty close to where he was. (not too easy to do in a fighter cockpit).

There were a number of problems with the technology--being low frequency, it could be messed up by static and atmospherics. There was also reverse sensing, where the pilot thought he was tuning in on the signal but actually was tuning to the wrong end of its energy lobe, thus reading the heading 180 degrees wrong. Lots of planes were lost by this error--it's suspected as the cause for the loss of Lady Be Good, the B-24 that crashed when it ran out of gas over North Africa in 1944. The crew died trying to reach water--the wreck was finally discovered in the 90's. The radio compass in the wreck was set 180 degrees off the bearing to the beacon that would have brought it home to its base.

In combat, the radio compass was generally used for forming up over friendly territory, homing in on what was called a "splasher" beacon. It was also used for DFing when a plane was returning from combat and needed a steer to its base. It wasn't of much use once you passed into enemy territory. It would have taken the Underground or Special Forces to set up beacons along the inbound route of a combat mission, and there's not much history of that having happened.

The "repeater compass" in our game is pretty close to a modern GPS navigation system, where waypoints can be programmmed in by lat/long before the flight, and the pilot notified when the points are reached, or the plane even programmed to fly the flight profile through a series of waypoints all by itself.

Cheers,

Haigotron
04-19-2006, 03:49 PM
thank you for that wonderful reply!

now i feel better

mortoma
04-19-2006, 03:58 PM
I agree with Jungmann, it's not realistic as presented in our game. Besides there being no chance of reverese sensing, it's totally preposterous to believe that your friendly forces could set up convenient radio beacon units behind enemy lines!! I mean really!!! Also out in the ocean, like it's presented in PF theater?? Pure stupidity, but it's done for newcomers/noobs that need the help navigating, which is needed for them I supppose.

Treetop64
04-19-2006, 06:59 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by mortoma:
Pure stupidity, but it's done for newcomers/noobs that need the help navigating, which is needed for them I supppose. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

...And what, exactly, is that supposed to mean?

Waldo.Pepper
04-19-2006, 08:23 PM
With respect to all posters this is a highly complex subject. One of the better discussions on prewar navigation is in a book called The First Pathfinders. I have scanned some relevant pages here.



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/fugly/14-15.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/fugly/16-17.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/fugly/18-19.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/fugly/20.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/fugly/22-23.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/fugly/24-25.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/fugly/26-27.jpg

mortoma
04-19-2006, 09:15 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Treetop64:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by mortoma:
Pure stupidity, but it's done for newcomers/noobs that need the help navigating, which is needed for them I supppose. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

...And what, exactly, is that supposed to mean? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Exactly what it says!! I didn't say that newcomers were stupid, I was one once you know, so were you. A simple understanding of sentence constuction ( and the context of the entire post ) should indicate to you I mean it's a stupidly unrealistic feature for advanced players, but needed for newcomers to help them out. Never once did I infer any people were stupid, just the feature.

joeap
04-20-2006, 04:52 AM
I always thought it was supposed to represent the pilot manually changing the heading he was supposed to fly, you know take off turn to heading 130 fly for 25 minutes at 300km/h and altitude 2000M then you should be over (significant ground feature) then turn to heading 100 for about 12 minutes til over target area enemy artillery at hill X. The little pointer was just showing which direction to fly to get back to heading. The radio thing was possible sometimes in WWII but not always.

Haigotron
04-20-2006, 10:07 AM
Excellent scans, I had to print them out and read them, but very interesting, I had absolutely no clue how it was all setup!