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luftluuver
08-25-2007, 04:41 PM
Was watching the show Engineering an Empire and it said in one battle between the Cartheginians and the Romans, the Romans lost 50-70,000 dead.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Cannae

Now with that many dead one would think that if they were buried there would be mass graves being found from time to time, not just from this battle but from many others battles though out history with very large numbers of dead.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Most_lethal_battles_in_world_history

Were the dead buried, or cremated or, .....?

luftluuver
08-25-2007, 04:41 PM
Was watching the show Engineering an Empire and it said in one battle between the Cartheginians and the Romans, the Romans lost 50-70,000 dead.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Cannae

Now with that many dead one would think that if they were buried there would be mass graves being found from time to time, not just from this battle but from many others battles though out history with very large numbers of dead.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Most_lethal_battles_in_world_history

Were the dead buried, or cremated or, .....?

XyZspineZyX
08-25-2007, 04:47 PM
Good question. I know that at least one Legion disappeared without a trace having ever been found- the 7th, I think, on duty in Caledonia. The local blue-painted folks could have even eaten 'em, I suppose...but it's a mystery as to what happened to their remains, and all of their gear, Just...gone

Waldo.Pepper
08-25-2007, 04:47 PM
Funeral pyres springs to mind.

DuxCorvan
08-25-2007, 05:10 PM
1) When battles were that massive, most of the remains were left after being plundered by the winners, and then forsaken for a long time and abandoned to beasts and ravens, being lost and dispersed for good.

The Roman disaster in the Teutoburg Forest left huge amounts of human rests whose bones could be still seen for decades after the ambush.

Anyway, the pre-Christian Romans didn't bury their dead. They were cremated. So, yes, funeral pyres -at least for the notable ones- come to mind.

2) @Cid: There were no blue-painted folks in the north of the Isles in those times, if you refer to Picts. Proper Picts were a bit later in that timeline. Their forerunners and ancestors, the Caledonians, were Brythonic natives with scarce Celtic influence, and it seems that they didn't adopt yet the woad painting favoured by their southern Celtic neighbors.

3) BTW, the Battle of Cannae is one of the most decisive and brilliant battles of Ancient world.

XyZspineZyX
08-25-2007, 05:36 PM
Joking, Dux, joking

SeaFireLIV
08-25-2007, 05:44 PM
Dux is right and took the words I was going to post about teutoburg of which remains are still discovered today.

You have to remember that the ravages of time does much to disperse remains of men and battles. It`s not as if a mighty battle happens then the area stays pristine for the next 1000 years so every one can come look.

Also, the evidence is always there, it`s just that people don`t see it, even though they live, sleep and work right in the midst of it sometimes. Even you may be sitting on top of some ancient battleground, churning over bits of dead ancient bodies and bits obliviously as you do the gardening.

The earth is used to (and good at) absorbing the dead.

As for mass graves, I don`t think it quite worked like that, most dead, especially losers, would be left to rot and be picked off. Some large graves have been found of warrior dead though they tend to be graves of notable Chiefs (complete with horses) than mass.

JZG_Thiem
08-25-2007, 05:53 PM
at those times (ancient world and medieval), there wasnt much of buriying corpses. Usually they were left on the fields. Afaik, Roman emperor Augustus sent some scouts a few years after the teutoburg battle, in order to figure out what happened to those 3 legions. They found remains still littering the fields. I think they let it go natures way (worms n stuff being extremely happy).

btw: Cannae was not the only roman defeat at that time (although it was the most crushing one for the roman empire ever). Hannibal tricked them 2 times shortly before, with similar annihilating resuts, only on a somewhat *smaller scale* (ca. 30000 each).