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View Full Version : UK: Time Team, A-26 crash investigation



Aaron_GT
03-09-2008, 01:48 PM
Over the weekend I happened onto one of the Channel 4 versions (More 4, I think) which was running a series of Time Teams. One was an investigation of the crash of two A-26s in November 1944 near Liverpool. It's probably available on the Channel 4 download system (I am not sure if this allows access for non-UK people).

The programme also included a poignant phone call with the sister of one of the pilots who died (3 crew died, no word on how many survived, how many on board each plane, etc.)

[Spoiler below]

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The gist of the documentary is that it seems that the visibility from the A-26 was not suited to the standard light bomber formation flying system of the USAAF at the time, and the squadron was forming up in poor weather. One of the aircraft from the rear flight seems to have come up underneath the other aircraft, and possibly chopped out a chunk of the rear fuselage around the ventral turret location. The lower rear fuselage in that area was not found, and the fuselage was separated.

The pilots involved were experienced and dedicated, but only had 10 days on type. Apparently the accident led to a change in formation flying procedures for the A-26, with no other collisions for the type.

Aaron_GT
03-09-2008, 01:48 PM
Over the weekend I happened onto one of the Channel 4 versions (More 4, I think) which was running a series of Time Teams. One was an investigation of the crash of two A-26s in November 1944 near Liverpool. It's probably available on the Channel 4 download system (I am not sure if this allows access for non-UK people).

The programme also included a poignant phone call with the sister of one of the pilots who died (3 crew died, no word on how many survived, how many on board each plane, etc.)

[Spoiler below]

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

The gist of the documentary is that it seems that the visibility from the A-26 was not suited to the standard light bomber formation flying system of the USAAF at the time, and the squadron was forming up in poor weather. One of the aircraft from the rear flight seems to have come up underneath the other aircraft, and possibly chopped out a chunk of the rear fuselage around the ventral turret location. The lower rear fuselage in that area was not found, and the fuselage was separated.

The pilots involved were experienced and dedicated, but only had 10 days on type. Apparently the accident led to a change in formation flying procedures for the A-26, with no other collisions for the type.

Xiolablu3
03-10-2008, 05:45 PM
Interesting, I dont like most of the time team stuff, bnits of old pot and rocks, however old WW2 stuff is cool, I will look out for it.