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Pirschjaeger
11-20-2005, 09:03 PM
TO ALL THE KIDS WHO SURVIVED the 1930's 40's, 50's, 60's,and the 70's!!

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they carried us. They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and didn't get tested for diabetes.

Then after that trauma, our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paints. We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took hitchhiking.

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a truck on a warm day was always a special treat. We drank water from the hose and NOT from a bottle. We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE actually died from this.

We ate cupcakes, white bread and real butter
and drank soft drink with sugar in it, but we weren't overweight because WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on. No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K. We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no surround sound, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or Internet chat rooms..........WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents. We were given cowboy guns for our 10th birthdays, made up game with sticks and tennis balls and although we were told it would happen we did not poke out very many
eyes.

We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live in us forever.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just walked in and talked to them!

The town football club had tryout for the junior team and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever! The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned HOW TO DEAL WITH IT ALL!


And YOU are one of them! CONGRATULATIONS!

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
11-20-2005, 09:03 PM
TO ALL THE KIDS WHO SURVIVED the 1930's 40's, 50's, 60's,and the 70's!!

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they carried us. They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and didn't get tested for diabetes.

Then after that trauma, our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paints. We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took hitchhiking.

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a truck on a warm day was always a special treat. We drank water from the hose and NOT from a bottle. We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE actually died from this.

We ate cupcakes, white bread and real butter
and drank soft drink with sugar in it, but we weren't overweight because WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on. No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K. We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no surround sound, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or Internet chat rooms..........WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents. We were given cowboy guns for our 10th birthdays, made up game with sticks and tennis balls and although we were told it would happen we did not poke out very many
eyes.

We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live in us forever.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just walked in and talked to them!

The town football club had tryout for the junior team and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever! The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned HOW TO DEAL WITH IT ALL!


And YOU are one of them! CONGRATULATIONS!

Fritz

thefarb2
11-20-2005, 09:14 PM
great post, don't know what to add, wish progress made us better off.

wayno7777
11-20-2005, 09:16 PM
Yes, it's all fun and games until someone loses an eye, then it's just fun....

Loco-S
11-20-2005, 09:47 PM
Im glad the internet is anonymous...otherwise you could have a horde of lawyers at your door handling you legal notices and lawsuits on this eye opening and highly reactionary post!!!... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

WTE_Ibis
11-20-2005, 10:48 PM
Yes that and more Fritz, we had gonks or shangies
or whatever the local name is and we walked our streets, most of which were usually gravel with our air rifles. Nobody minded because we harmed
nobody.
We left the doors unlocked to the house and the car was never locked,you simply left it there and it was there when you returned.
I feel so sorry for the kids of today, they miss out on all the things we took for granted. You can't tell me things have changed for the better.
The only thing "progress" has brought us is,----Wait for it----Drum roll please-------
IL2 FORGOTTEN BATTLES. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

WTE_Ibis
11-20-2005, 10:53 PM
Pirschjaeger
Destination: Valhalla
Picture of Pirschjaeger

Posted Sun November 20 2005 20:03
TO ALL THE KIDS WHO SURVIVED the 1930's 40's, 50's, 60's,and the 70's!!

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they carried us. They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and didn't get tested for diabetes.

Then after that trauma, our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paints. We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took hitchhiking.

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a truck on a warm day was always a special treat. We drank water from the hose and NOT from a bottle. We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE actually died from this.

We ate cupcakes, white bread and real butter
and drank soft drink with sugar in it.

----------------------------------------


Maybe that's the reason I'm crazy. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

.

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 12:49 AM
Ibis, that could actually be the answer to all our current problems. I never trusted cupcakes anyway. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif


Fritz

vanjast
11-21-2005, 01:18 AM
Damm.... Good, damm good!

AAAAahhh the good ole days when you could be naughty and suffered a beating if you were caught. You never did that twice - heh heh.

Back in those wonderfull days my brother and I made a kite. We lived in this very small town down the South Coast. So it was windy and we're going to 'fly a kite'. In the back yard I let the the kite go as my brother ran with the string. The kite went up.. and up... and up into the overhead powerline. We were 5 and 6 years old, and we had just shut down a whole town. We saw the black clouds over the horizon and for hours we cringed in fear. When my father got home he beat the s.h-i,t out of us with his belt. The next incident he caught us stealing his cigarettes and smoking them behind the house. We thought the world was going to end, but he brought out 2 cigars and said "Smokem!".
My mom freaked and we 'died'.

We never flew kites near power lines or smoked cigarettes again, but we did stir up trouble with the neighbours. And we definitely KNOW WHERE OUR LIMITS ARE.

I treat my kids the same way, and I've told them if they don't like it, they must move out and find another set of parents prepared to put up with their 'nonsense'. They're happy to stay at home. In a way I feel sorry for kids of today, they will probably create another world war, and then rediscover what most parents nowdays forget to do, DISCIPLINE them.
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 01:25 AM
Vanjast, it seems we have similar up bringings.

Me + havoc = beatings, me + havoc = beatings, me + havoc = beatings, me + havoc = beatings, me + havoc = beatings, me + havoc = beatings,....

The only difference for me between now and then is I ran out of fresh ideas for creating havoc. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

The pain from the beatings go away but the memory of the havoc lives on. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Fritz

bazzaah2
11-21-2005, 01:34 AM
jumpers for goal posts!

Spot on!

vanjast
11-21-2005, 01:50 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

I was speaking to another guy about 10 years older than me ~55. Him and a friend blew up their garage with some mix of chemicals. He said they were lucky to be alive as they had hid behind a log when it blew....They were 'beaten' for their endeavours.

Actually this reminds me of the time I put a thunderflash in a 2 pint milk bottle. Brother and I had sense to hide behind a tree. I've never seen so much glass fly like that, and thunk, thunk, thunk as the pieces flew into my tree. We were not caught on this one, but how stupid were we http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 03:11 AM
My buddy poured camp fuel down the drain of the kitchen sink. He then dropped a match in the sink. I couldn't stop laughing. He had no eyebrows or bangs left. Not to mention, the plumbing needed a lot of repair work. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Opa was a welder and machinist after the war. One day, while Oma and Opa were out, my uncle decided to weld Oma's tea kettle air tight. He put it on the stove and waited. Oma and Opa came home to a destroyed kitchen. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Uncle Gunter has a very good understanding of what pressure can do.

Fritz

nakamura_kenji
11-21-2005, 03:30 AM
i no old(20) enough be member this group but i share storie

when i 12 one winter it much cold that any water on ground turn ice very quick. me, friend get idea we get plastic bag and fill with water and then during lunch break school we pour over car park where teacher car are. after school it turn in solid sheet ice no teacher able drive car straight they just slide about bounce off each other ^_^ bounce bash crck bounce. we never get caught ^_^

other thing be only reason me, friend take chemistry class one reason be black powder aka gunpowder for long time we know ingredient and know how make except one thing what be salt peter? we find out turn out have plenty supply it make from pee ^_^. summer we make DIY rpg that iraq insurgant be proud unforunate we go coutry side fire but acident happen way there. how fuse rocket ignite in rucksack friend on bycycle it launch out top his bag ^_^. he fine but bag wreck luck guess it no blow up back.

other time chemistry we do experiment with calcium.had to much so i tip excess down plug hole no think. teecher go wash his hand what happen be simple chemistry. calicum no like water much it expand big white bubble liquid. when water hit calicum bottom of pipe up come large fountain white bubble iquid to meet teecher in face oops^_^

sorry if i no allow post here thought might like story

MEGILE
11-21-2005, 03:42 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by nakamura_kenji:
i no old(20) enough be member this group but i share storie

when i 12 one winter it much cold that any water on ground turn ice very quick. me, friend get idea we get plastic bag and fill with water and then during lunch break school we pour over car park where teacher car are. after school it turn in solid sheet ice no teacher able drive car straight they just slide about bounce off each other ^_^ bounce bash crck bounce. we never get caught ^_^

other thing be only reason me, friend take chemistry class one reason be black powder aka gunpowder for long time we know ingredient and know how make except one thing what be salt peter? we find out turn out have plenty supply it make from pee ^_^. summer we make DIY rpg that iraq insurgant be proud unforunate we go coutry side fire but acident happen way there. how fuse rocket ignite in rucksack friend on bycycle it launch out top his bag ^_^. he fine but bag wreck luck guess it no blow up back.

other time chemistry we do experiment with calcium.had to much so i tip excess down plug hole no think. teecher go wash his hand what happen be simple chemistry. calicum no like water much it expand big white bubble liquid. when water hit calicum bottom of pipe up come large fountain white bubble iquid to meet teecher in face oops^_^

sorry if i no allow post here thought might like story </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

danjama
11-21-2005, 04:17 AM
Hey Fritz, Nice Post! Ya know us '90's babies had the same kind of childhood. Im only 18 so the memories are fresher in my mind than it is for you oldie's. Ill post a few memories when im in from college! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 04:54 AM
Ha ha ha, Kenji, that's funny. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Fritz

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-21-2005, 04:54 AM
Thought provoking as ever, Fritz.
I'm with Fred Wedlock (one hit wonder comedian) on this one. "When it takes you all night to do what you used to do all night..." The oldest swinger in town.

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 04:55 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by danjama:
Hey Fritz, Nice Post! Ya know us '90's babies had the same kind of childhood. Im only 18 so the memories are fresher in my mind than it is for you oldie's. Ill post a few memories when im in from college! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

No problem Danjama. We still got a few years left to wait. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

If you find your chemistry prof is named Kenji, drop the class immediately and run. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz

jds1978
11-21-2005, 04:57 AM
c'mon, PJ...throw us 80's kids a bone (LOL) http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

Great post!

hotspace
11-21-2005, 05:01 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
My buddy poured camp fuel down the drain of the kitchen sink. He then dropped a match in the sink. I couldn't stop laughing. He had no eyebrows or bangs left. Not to mention, the plumbing needed a lot of repair work. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Opa was a welder and machinist after the war. One day, while Oma and Opa were out, my uncle decided to weld Oma's tea kettle air tight. He put it on the stove and waited. Oma and Opa came home to a destroyed kitchen. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Uncle Gunter has a very good understanding of what pressure can do.

Fritz </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Hot Space

nakamura_kenji
11-21-2005, 05:15 AM
remember friend once mistake use netsend feature of windows when he try send message to me.

*message appear onscreen* "hi kenji wave if see"

look up see friend wave across room then notice rest of class confuse. look screen beside me and see same message. he no only send message me, no only rest class, no only rest department but rest school 300+ computer on 6 floor &gt;_&lt;

he get network privalage go bye bye for mounth

KG26_Alpha
11-21-2005, 05:44 AM
Me and my catapault at age 11-13 (and my old pals 4 of us)

My 3 year reign of local terror was abruptly ground to a halt by a local bobby (policeman) on his push bike, he chased me for nearly 2 miles, I gave up when he called out to me by my name ???

My list of regular targets my old hand made catty were

1. 99 Bus route was fun to hit, the conductor used to jump off and chase us around the woods, sometimes the passengers joined in. We used acorns to hit the windows and panels, made lots of noise but no damage.
2. The moany old git who had a large greenhouse and never answered the door when we were carole singing. And used to terrorize any pets that went near his house.
3. The coop milkman who used to have kids help with the early morning milk round and after 2 weeks sack them with no pay. (we got him good)

We didnt use stones as we had a large woods near us acorns were in great supply as were chestnuts.


Disclaimer: No animals or children were hurt in this 3 year period. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

We had great fun way back then and should all be dead or seriously maimed according to this "nanny state" we have now.
Bring back the beat bobby a police presence is need on the streets in the UK again.

Sturm_Williger
11-21-2005, 07:02 AM
Agree, bring back discipline and a beat bobby.

I'm not saying this will solve all the world's problems, but it will go a looooooong way in that direction http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

panther3485
11-21-2005, 07:43 AM
Can't speak for the whole World but I know what it was like here. Re the original post, those who were kids up until the 60's - definitely and those who were kids of the 70's perhaps just scrape in. After that, forget it. (Yes, there may be exceptions but in my neck of the woods at least, precious few.)

Seat belts for cars became compulsory in the 70's (initially for front seats, then for all seats) and shortly thereafter, helmets for motorcyclists. By the end of that decade, there were early signs of the phenomenon of 'Political Correctness' and this started to take a firm hold on our lives by the mid-late 80's.

By the late 80's, far more parents were beginning to 'wrap their kids in cotton wool' at home and drive them to school and back every day. Not because of the distance.

There was a growing movement against 'spanking' at home and corporal punishment became banned in schools.

One could go on and on, but you get the picture.

There have been so many changes in our lives and in the way we are led to think today, compared to three, four and five decades ago. It's almost as if it has become a different World in so many ways, yet underneath somehow remaining the same in other ways. Strange paradox, I think.

But to really appreciate this, you need to have experienced and seen such changes first hand, over the required number of decades.

It is a rarity today, to see any children playing/living as my generation did, from the 50's through to the mid 60's. Even my kids' times were quite different, let alone two generations on. This contrast looks even more pronounced to my father, who grew up through the late 20's and the 30's.

Of course, much of this change has been for the better.

Some of it, I'm not so sure about. But we do have to accept that things have changed, are changing and will continue to change and make the best out of it that we can.

I'm an old fart but I survive quite well in today's age; better than some of my peers, at least, who seem to want to go the way of the dinosaurs.


Best regards to all,
panther3485

nakamura_kenji
11-21-2005, 07:58 AM
panther guess british? father work there he say obseess with rule, health, safty, pc.

maybe experience I different because way brought up ie no west. father very much no wrap me cotton i learn kendo with no wear armour have scar(when shinai break) and xray to prove ^_^. no sure he try teach me or kill me need say i no make same mistake twice. guess why find west odd at time

panther3485
11-21-2005, 08:13 AM
Hi there, nakamura_kenji,

My father's family was British, of partly Norwegian origin. My mother's family was part British and part Coloured South African (Coloured = part white, part black). Our family migrated to Australia when I was very young and I consider myself Australian.
I served in the Australian Army from 1973 to 1982.

I enjoy reading your posts.

Best regards,
panther3485

Banger2004
11-21-2005, 08:30 AM
Fritz, your original post is so spot-on. Brought the memories flooding back! In my part of the world there are several derelict old tin and copper mines, very picturesque, but also very dangerous.

Did we care? No, we climbed all over the crumbling buildings, walked into open tunnels with no torches, played on the 'contaminated' spoil heaps, played in old cars dumped into the open mineshafts (100's of feet deep!), all with the risk of the cars falling into the shaft. If only our mother's knew http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

I could go on about the ways my brothers, friends and myself used to fill the long summer holidays, but suffice to say, they were great days (60s,70s, 80s), and I would'nt change any of it.

vanjast
11-21-2005, 08:49 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by panther3485:
My father's family was British, of partly Norwegian origin. My mother's family was part British and part Coloured South African (Coloured = part white, part black). </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yo panther, the other third, is now claimed to be Khoi-San. This has only been acknowledged recently with a bit of resistance. That is here in the good ole RS-of-A
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Loco-S
11-21-2005, 09:47 AM
I can relate a little of what this post was about, but very little, I grew up in Peru, political correctness is an unknown thing, we call white white and black is black, in some aspects we are in the 1940's in some others we are up to the new century, if somebody insults you, you are entitled to kick his *** and you have no fear of being sued ( the law system there is so slow that even if somebody sues you, the suit can follow for decades..hence, there is no reason to sue anybody, because is a waste of time and money)I grew up in the 70's and learned to play hard, fight fair and have fun in a clean way, I hiked the andes, went to the beach to camp ( BTW there you can camp wherever you want as long the land owner lets you...he he) played on farmlands and read a lot, my mother only allowed us to watch one program a day on TV, otherwise we either were on homework or running wild all day until the street lights came on, you could be white, black indian or whatever, and there is no restrictions or shame in calling somebody indian, black or whitey ( they called me shrimp because I was quite white and when I got sunburned I got shrimp red) I saw my first video game ( Atari console ) in the mid 1980's and got my first computer in 1995 ( a whopping 33 mhz 386 with 2 mb ram and 72 mb hard drive..whew...)

there was a concrete factory near my house ( about 3 miles) and on the weekends we used to go with bikes to ride on the deep ravines near by, and dodge the guard dogs at full speed...kids of today are so "protected" that they have no chances to do all the stuff that some of us could do back then.....I guess we are evolving into an indoor culture, with not many options of going out and have clean fun....

I wonder if someone of you still remember the gatherings at parks and or friends houses to play all afternoon, playing "war" with homemade wood and plastic pipe "guns", and getting so dirty that the only clean thing left was your eyes?....he he...I do.

BSS_Goat
11-21-2005, 09:55 AM
D@mn Loco it sounds like we grew up in the same neighborhood. I was in smalltown Virginia and you were in Peru.....small world, kinda neat two different cultures same childhood.

I was born in 1969. Best childhood ever....

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 10:01 AM
Since I first posted this Yesterday morning, it's had me thinking quite a bit about the changes.

I tend to dislike computers but must use them since there's no vacancy for me at the museum. Gotta go with the flow right? I often think of the all time I have wasted on this so-called scientific marvel. We are so proud of this technical wonder. We can communicate with almost anyone in the world without having to lift our butts. We have unprecidented access to propaganda.

I miss writing, handwriting(with a pen)letters and posting them. It's even better to receive. I don't get out much anymore unless it's for business. We talk about how this internet brings us closer together. Total propaganda marketing BS. Think about it for a minute. I see and communicate face to face with people less than ever before.

Now I see children mentally locked to Gameboy for hours on end. There eyes don't even move. As they reach the golden years their thumbs will be the first part to fail. When we were children we could only be bored long enough to whine "I'm bored" three times. After that we went out and found something to do. Hell, we could even make a game out of roadkill if there was nothing else.

I have found a solution for myself though. Next month I'll move back to Germany to a little insignificant village surrounded by many other insignificant villages. When I am home everyone knows me. Typically Saturday is the day you help a buddy repair his car or house. Sunday is for outdoor stuff with the family and friends. When you walk into the Kneiper the bartender or barmaid has already started filling a beer glass from the tap with your favorite beer.

Ah, this is the life. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

I've always figured we only live once. There's a start and an end and anything else is yet to be proven, so I'll put my money on what I know. A beginning and an end, and everything in between counts. That's all we have. Cities are for business, villages are for living. Living the good life is still possible. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

BTW, did you know that turning of your handi on the weekend is still an accepted practice in villages? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 10:17 AM
Loco and Goat, I can relate. We used to play "chicken" with guard dogs and bulls. I was never good at climbing fences but it's amazing how a bull a few yards befind you can inspire man to fly. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

We used to sneak out on weekend mornings with axes. We'd meet in the forest and created our own amusement rides. One would climb to the highest possible point in the tree while the others would chop it down. He he he, that was always a wild ride.

When I was about 10 I took off into the forest looking for adventure. I found it. An old abandoned pick up, from the late 40's. I jumped in, closed the door and started my imaginary driving, which of course was rudely interrupted by hornets. Seemed they had nests inside. It might have been more fun if I hadn't panic and realized I had looked the door.

After freaking out and starting to go numb from all those litle BnZers, I decided I had to fight back. Don't know how many I got to kill but it was enough. Exhausted but victorious I was finally smart enough to notice the lock. I got out, went home, made my mother scream and run around the house trying to decide how to care for me. I thought I was fine, just twice my normal size, my nostrils and one eye swelled shut. My lips looked like Fat Albert's. I had Schwartzennegger fore arms. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Yep, today's kids don't know what they are missing. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Fritz

Airmail109
11-21-2005, 10:18 AM
Im a late 80s child and my childhood was great! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Ive done most of the things pirschyaeger mentioned + others! Eg out shooting air rifles with my mates, camping in next to our local lake, crashed in a field with mates...bmxing with my mates....believe me a lot of kids still go outside to play but it takes a different form eg skating and such. The list goes on.

but anyway **** Tony Blair to hell....**** HIM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Im 17 where as half my mates are now 18, I swear when I was 15 I could get served alcohol in pubs more easily, that boring git ruined it for me by clamping down, its not like we were the problem it was the towny dregs who used to drink in the streets that were the problem.....now there are more townies drinking where they shouldnt be...hmmm i wonder why

SeaFireLIV
11-21-2005, 11:02 AM
Mid-life crisis... That`s supposed to happen when you get around 40, doesn`t it?

I`m 39... I don`t feel anything yet.

Loco-S
11-21-2005, 12:06 PM
you never know how much you will live, for all I know my "midlife" crisis may have come and gone......he he

huggy87
11-21-2005, 08:08 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
TO ALL THE KIDS WHO SURVIVED the 1930's 40's, 50's, 60's,and the 70's!!

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they carried us. They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and didn't get tested for diabetes.

Then after that trauma, our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paints. We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took hitchhiking.

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a truck on a warm day was always a special treat. We drank water from the hose and NOT from a bottle. We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE actually died from this.

We ate cupcakes, white bread and real butter
and drank soft drink with sugar in it, but we weren't overweight because WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on. No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K. We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no surround sound, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or Internet chat rooms..........WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents. We were given cowboy guns for our 10th birthdays, made up game with sticks and tennis balls and although we were told it would happen we did not poke out very many
eyes.

We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live in us forever.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just walked in and talked to them!

The town football club had tryout for the junior team and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever! The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned HOW TO DEAL WITH IT ALL!


And YOU are one of them! CONGRATULATIONS!

Fritz </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes. And you back-patters are the same ones who built the world that kids currently live in. What! Do you think modern kids designed this system? Instead of being so self-congragulatory maybe you should thank your parents generation and wonder how you screwed it up so bad.

blakduk
11-21-2005, 08:26 PM
Pirschjaeger- you naughty boy, you've ripped off an email that's been doing the rounds for a long time http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
I remember as a 12year old boy going to the local newsagency and buying ammunition. We could get shotgun shells, .22 standard and magnum calibre bullets etc. Our school used to have trap shooting as a sport- the rule was you had to take your shotgun to the headmasters office in the morning and while on the bus it had to stay zipped in its case http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif (I'm scaring myself as i'm writing this but it seemed okay at the time).
I also recall my mates and i riding our motorbikes out into the bush with our rifles across our backs to go shooting.... anything really. We would only have been 15 or 16 at the time. These days if i saw a posse of four teenagers running amok in the bush with motorbikes, firerarms and alcohol (plus illegal substances) i would be calling the national newspapers bemoaning the loss of the world as we know it and heralding the dawn of an new dark age http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif
I still think it's a miracle we survived AND dont have serious criminal records.

BSS_Goat
11-21-2005, 08:34 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by huggy87:

Yes. And you back-patters are the same ones who built the world that kids currently live in. What! Do you think modern kids designed this system? Instead of being so self-congragulatory maybe you should thank your parents generation and wonder how you screwed it up so bad. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Go away punk, before I tell your Mommy your being disrespectfull. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

96th_Nightshifter
11-21-2005, 08:38 PM
Well.....I was born in 78 (not so old) and I have to say I can relate to the first post too. My childhood consisted of (at the weekends) getting up at the crack of dawn and going out and meeting my mates at the park, football pitch, treehouse, den whatever, go air rifle shooting, bmx riding (for as far as we could before realising "where the hell are we?")........the point is we were all out side playing. We may go home for a quick sandwich at lunch time or not. My parents didn't call the police and nothing bad happened to me.
I remember one time 3 yeah 3 of us all piled onto a mountain bike (with no brakes, no helmets) found the biggest hill we could and went down it and when we inevitably crashed at the bottom we laughed our butts off and done it again.
I now have two kids of my own and I hated how all they wanted to do is sit and watch tv and how "dangerous" we are told the world is for them - luckily I'm still young and forced them to go out and play football with me and/or find some friends of their own - I refuse to let my kids be robbed of their childhood and waste it indoors. What kind of fun memories will they be typing about when they get older if all they did as kids was stay inside?
There is hope; they now ask to go out and play with the local kids and hate it when I have to tell them to come in at night lol

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 08:41 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by huggy87:
Yes. And you back-patters are the same ones who built the world that kids currently live in. What! Do you think modern kids designed this system? Instead of being so self-congragulatory maybe you should thank your parents generation and wonder how you screwed it up so bad. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Don't take it so seriously Huggy, it was more of a joke. I picked out of my e-mail spam and thought it was funny and wanted to share it.

On a serious note though, you are right. My better half has a 9 year old boy from a previous relationship. I've been thinking for a long time now about how I will pry that blasted Gameboy from his life.

Normally when solving a problem we have to find the root. His lazy father is the blame. When he visits his father on the weekends he is babysat by the TV or video games. When I get back to Germany next month it will be my personal mission to teach this boy how to do something useful, like build a dog house for his dog. I'll flatten the tires on his bike, take him to a hardware store, and buy all the tools he needs to fix them.

He likes trains so I built a layout for him but hadn't finished the scenery. He'll learn how to do that. He's been invited to join a professional football school so I guess I'll have to learn to play football and try to challenge him often.

I won't b!tch at him for playing his Gameboy. In fact I'll never mention it. I'll simply find more interesting things for him to do and spend time with him.

Your are right Huggy, it's not his fault.

Fritz

marc_hawkins
11-21-2005, 08:44 PM
Another 78'er here! I spent most of my early childhood in the wilds of the county of somerset with an interesting farm type life. Great but i still distrust crossing roads now http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Mackane1
11-21-2005, 08:51 PM
We played hockey in the street with goals crudely made from "two by fours" and "chicken wire".(...all swiped from local house building sites of course.}...and we had "skate keys" around our necks.

An empty refrigerator box was worth its weight in gold and your day was planned.

You literally "flight tested" your new "PF Fliers" by running and jumping up and down the block a few times.

If you hit the ball up on someones roof, it was an "out".

Street football was measured by "sewers".

If someone up the street was washing their car, you and your pals would rush down the block to build a dam in front of the storm sewer...made from anything you could find......just to see if you could stop the water.

No one wore a backpack...you carried your school books in you hands.

You knew what a "Spaldeen" was.

Bicycles had "sissybars" and "banana seats".

I could think of more but it's getting late... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif


Cheers,
Mackane

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 08:55 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by blakduk:
Pirschjaeger- you naughty boy, you've ripped off an email that's been doing the rounds for a long time http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Pirschjaeger's email spam rule #1: 5% of email spam is 100% good for this forum. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

When we were around 10, we used to sneak my buddy's father's shotguns and go either duck, rabbit, or pheasant hunting. His father realized what we were doing and locked up his collection, but not his shells.

We saved our money we made from working on farms($5 for 9 hours) until we had enough to buy the necessary equipment. We used electrical conduit inside a slightly larger pipe(about 4 feet long). We took it to a welder and got him to weld a wheelbarrel rim to the pipe, about 1.5 feet from the end. We told him we were building a wagon. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Then we'd go to the marsh where there was a stone wall. We'd set our homemade artilery in the stone wall. At one end the conduit was threaded and we had a cap with a small hole drilled. We'd put the shotgun shell inside and screw the cap on tight. My buddy would aim our cannon while I'd use a nail held by vice-grips and give it a wack with the hammer.

One summer we got three ducks. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 08:58 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 96th_Nightshifter:
Well.....I was born in 78 (not so old) and I have to say I can relate to the first post too. My childhood consisted of (at the weekends) getting up at the crack of dawn and going out and meeting my mates at the park, football pitch, treehouse, den whatever, go air rifle shooting, bmx riding (for as far as we could before realising "where the hell are we?")........the point is we were all out side playing. We may go home for a quick sandwich at lunch time or not. My parents didn't call the police and nothing bad happened to me.
I remember one time 3 yeah 3 of us all piled onto a mountain bike (with no brakes, no helmets) found the biggest hill we could and went down it and when we inevitably crashed at the bottom we laughed our butts off and done it again.
I now have two kids of my own and I hated how all they wanted to do is sit and watch tv and how "dangerous" we are told the world is for them - luckily I'm still young and forced them to go out and play football with me and/or find some friends of their own - I refuse to let my kids be robbed of their childhood and waste it indoors. What kind of fun memories will they be typing about when they get older if all they did as kids was stay inside?
There is hope; they now ask to go out and play with the local kids and hate it when I have to tell them to come in at night lol </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

During the summer my mother used to ban us from coming in the house unless it was to use the toilet or get band-aids. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz

Brass_Monkey
11-21-2005, 08:58 PM
Right on Fritz, Hell, I still got my Davy Crockett coonskin hat.

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 09:00 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Brass_Monkey:
Right on Fritz, Hell, I still got my Davy Crockett coonskin hat. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ha ha ha, do you still wear it? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz

Brass_Monkey
11-21-2005, 09:05 PM
Only when I have fantasies about Billfish, http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif Ouch, I'll behave from now on.
Musta be that lead paint I used to chew on. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

blakduk
11-21-2005, 09:08 PM
Pirschjaeger- you managed to get something with that cannon? That's pretty amazing.
My mate once made a DIY blunderbuss- it was basically a pipe forced shut at one end with bolt from an old .22 rifle. I cant remember how he rigged it but you could pull the bullet out of it casing and fix it to the bolt. You basically pulled the bolt back and let it snap back to ignite the primer. We put powder from shotgun shells in it, wadded it with newspaper, and put in a collection of air-rifle pellets and other bits of metal. Never killed anything with it but it made a h*ll of a noise and damaged trees.
Strangely my mates dad found it, pronounced it dangerous, and took it off us http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif I cant think why.

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 09:08 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Mackane1:
We played hockey in the street with goals crudely made from "two by fours" and "chicken wire".(...all swiped from local house building sites of course.}...and we had "skate keys" around our necks.

An empty refrigerator box was worth its weight in gold and your day was planned.

You literally "flight tested" your new "PF Fliers" by running and jumping up and down the block a few times.

If you hit the ball up on someones roof, it was an "out".

Street football was measured by "sewers".

If someone up the street was washing their car, you and your pals would rush down the block to build a dam in front of the storm sewer...made from anything you could find......just to see if you could stop the water.

No one wore a backpack...you carried your school books in you hands.

You knew what a "Spaldeen" was.

Bicycles had "sissybars" and "banana seats".

I could think of more but it's getting late... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif


Cheers,
Mackane </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Remember how it was completely taboo for a boy to ride a girls bike? Your friends would dis-own you http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

This will be my first time to admit it but I preferred the girls bikes, I didn't crush my "******" when running into a wall. Working brakes were for sissies. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

We used to extend the front forks on the banana seat bikes to make them look like choppers. Then curse them when trying to turn tight. I guess today we might say "They stalled easy and were impossible to recover." http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 09:12 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Brass_Monkey:
Only when I have fantasies about Billfish, http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif Ouch, I'll behave from now on.
Musta be that lead paint I used to chew on. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Obviously that lead paint and cupcakes had a positive effect on LeBillfish. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Keep the coonskin cap. It will soften the blow when LeBillfish introduces you to Mr. Frying pan. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 09:25 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by blakduk:
Pirschjaeger- you managed to get something with that cannon? That's pretty amazing.
My mate once made a DIY blunderbuss- it was basically a pipe forced shut at one end with bolt from an old .22 rifle. I cant remember how he rigged it but you could pull the bullet out of it casing and fix it to the bolt. You basically pulled the bolt back and let it snap back to ignite the primer. We put powder from shotgun shells in it, wadded it with newspaper, and put in a collection of air-rifle pellets and other bits of metal. Never killed anything with it but it made a h*ll of a noise and damaged trees.
Strangely my mates dad found it, pronounced it dangerous, and took it off us http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif I cant think why. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

When I was 13 I got $20 from Oma for my b'day. I bought a semi-automatic 22 rifle from my neighbor. It was a replica of a AK-47. I took it to a friend whose brother was studying to be a machinist. He made a few grinding adjustments and made it fully automatic. The problem was it would jam and I had to use a screwdriver to pry the bent live round from the breach. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

My all time favorite gun was a 303. British. No one wanted these since they were so heavy. You could easily buy one from a friend for $50. I loved that gun. It was old, heavy as hell, and accurate.

BTW, this conversation reminds me of something from Michael Moore's "Bowling for Columbine". He goes to Canada and asks some teens why Canadians have more guns per house than Americans and why we have so few gun-related deaths. The teen with a look of surprise simply says "We just don't shoot each other." http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

If any nation decides to invade Canada, don't land in the east. There are more guns than people. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz

wayno7777
11-21-2005, 09:38 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by nakamura_kenji:
i no old(20) enough be member this group but i share storie

when i 12 one winter it much cold that any water on ground turn ice very quick. me, friend get idea we get plastic bag and fill with water and then during lunch break school we pour over car park where teacher car are. after school it turn in solid sheet ice no teacher able drive car straight they just slide about bounce off each other ^_^ bounce bash crck bounce. we never get caught ^_^

other thing be only reason me, friend take chemistry class one reason be black powder aka gunpowder for long time we know ingredient and know how make except one thing what be salt peter? we find out turn out have plenty supply it make from pee ^_^. summer we make DIY rpg that iraq insurgant be proud unforunate we go coutry side fire but acident happen way there. how fuse rocket ignite in rucksack friend on bycycle it launch out top his bag ^_^. he fine but bag wreck luck guess it no blow up back.

other time chemistry we do experiment with calcium.had to much so i tip excess down plug hole no think. teecher go wash his hand what happen be simple chemistry. calicum no like water much it expand big white bubble liquid. when water hit calicum bottom of pipe up come large fountain white bubble iquid to meet teecher in face oops^_^

sorry if i no allow post here thought might like story </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gifThat's better than soaping the windows. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif
Remember at Halloween going out to the cornfield with shopping bags and sitting between the rows shucking the kernels into the bags for tic-tacing? Then running thru the neighborhood throwing the corn at windows? Nothing destructive, but a heckuva lotta fun. Used to play war with up to 12 kids on a side and traverse the whole neighborhood. If not playing war, we were playing baseball or down at the crick fishing. The West End Drive-In was three blocks from my house and when we'd "camp" out in someones backyard, we'd get up at the crack of dawn(if we slept at all), go to the drive-in and walk the rows looking for change before the clean-up crew arrived. Candy money. We hit the jackpot one morning, a $50. We sent the littlest kid to the gas station to get change. Wrote a note from his "mom". I still remember how sick we all got....

p.s. speaking of stupid stuff, we would pop the door at the base of the drive-in screen and climb up the ladder inside. Only did that a couple of times. Some kid fell and broke an arm. No lawsuits. The owner just put a better lock on the door....

blakduk
11-21-2005, 09:49 PM
My mate did the same thing for my 22 semi-auto: with the same result http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif I also managed to get hold of a 15 round magazine but it used to jam twice as often when i tried to use it.
We had a big massacre here years ago and government policy changed- our gun laws are much stronger now and that gun got sold to the government during their amnesty for unregistered guns. I was glad to be rid of it as i hadnt been shooting for years.
As a father now it has changed my perspective on a lot of things- it used to be i could do dangerous sh*t and only have myself to worry about. Now that i have people who rely on me and i look out for them its VERY different.
As part of my job over the years has been working in emergency departments in hospitals we see far fewer kids hurt in car accidents- when i started it was routine that a few kids would come in each day with broken bones from low speed accidents. Its relatively rare now. Thankfully also the mortality rates are much lower- we forget just how many people died in accidents as a routine. Our road toll used to be published daily in our national newspapers and it would increase significantly every day.
I still recall my surprise when Ayrton Senna was killed in the F1 grand prix- not that he died but by people's reactions to the news. It used to be normal that F1 drivers died or were horrifically burned/injured. When Ayrton was killed it suddenly became apparent to me that it was no longer considered to be part of the sport.
When we look around at those of us who were fortunate enough to survive intact from our childhoods, we are looking at the survivors.
Its a bit like a once heard someone say 'They dont make music systems like they used to, i've had a system for 30years that sounds great'.
I pointed out to him that we made cr*p back then too, it just didnt survive and if you paid the same percentage of your income now on a system as he did back then, the system would be awesome!

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 10:31 PM
You only have to wack your forehead once on the dash of a 72' Dodge Valiant to see the changes and innovations is auto safety, or the coroner. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz

blakduk
11-21-2005, 10:48 PM
Sorry about my last post guys- i reread it and it looks a bit gloomy. It doesnt sit well with the original theme of this thread. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif
My childhood was great and there were many things we did that we were lucky to survive- it just looks different when someone else is taking the risks http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
I must admit though that i look at the toys kids get to play with these days and believe i was born too early. If i had more time to play Il2, and taken the time to study maths properly and get into flying rather than medicine, and talked to that girl at the bar BEFORE i had those drinks for Dutch courage http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif....

Pirschjaeger
11-21-2005, 10:55 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by blakduk:
Sorry about my last post guys- i reread it and it looks a bit gloomy. It doesnt sit well with the original theme of this thread. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif
My childhood was great and there were many things we did that we were lucky to survive- it just looks different when someone else is taking the risks http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
I must admit though that i look at the toys kids get to play with these days and believe i was born too early. If i had more time to play Il2, and taken the time to study maths properly and get into flying rather than medicine, and talked to that girl at the bar BEFORE i had those drinks for Dutch courage http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif.... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Gloomy, a little. Realistic, very. You are right and I feel it's a good point. To add, students today have a much better opportunity for education than we had. "They'll learn much more than we'll ever know."

Has anyone noticed this? According to my memory, 13 year old girls were not physically developed as they are today. GMO products? You are what you eat?

I'm expecting a daughter in March. No GMO products for her. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Fritz

panther3485
11-22-2005, 07:33 AM
Quote:

Has anyone noticed this? According to my memory, 13 year old girls were not physically developed as they are today. GMO products? You are what you eat?
I'm expecting a daughter in March. No GMO products for her.

Yes, I've noticed it myself and most other blokes I know have commented on it.

Can't remember where I read it exactly, but this may not be entirely from our imaginations. It seems the stats from some Western countries show that the average age for the onset of menstruation in girls is younger now (by at least one year or so), than in the 1960's.

On a slightly different note, another change that's relatively recent:
Couples once expected a baby. Now they expect a boy or a girl. Mind you, I know some who still choose not to know. I guess it's better to have that choice?

panther3485

panther3485
11-22-2005, 07:52 AM
Yo vanjast,

Quote:
quote:
Originally posted by panther3485:
My father's family was British, of partly Norwegian origin. My mother's family was part British and part Coloured South African (Coloured = part white, part black).

Yo panther, the other third, is now claimed to be Khoi-San. This has only been acknowledged recently with a bit of resistance. That is here in the good ole RS-of-A

The story of how Black African got merged into our family's gene pool is kind of interesting and involved a sort of 'reverse migration' but one term you have used puzzles me slightly. Forgive my ignorance but what is 'Khoi-San'?

The only thing I can think of is 'Khe Sanh' (battle of), as per the Vietnam conflict, but you didn't mean that, surely?

The Australians pulled out of Vietnam in 1972, if I recall correctly, so I joined up about a year after our active involvement there had ended. At this stage, there was still talk of us possibly going back in (not realistic in hindsight, but these were troubled times, full of uncertainty) and my parents were very worried. I remember Mum crying as I walked out through the door for the final time. I was 20.

Best regards to you,
panther3485

vanjast
11-22-2005, 01:05 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by panther3485:
Yo vanjast,
Forgive my ignorance but what is 'Khoi-San'?

Best regards to you,
panther3485 </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hi there, Khoi-San are the nomadic bushmen tribe that has been wandering around the west coastal regions of Southern Africa for yonks, according to anthropologists here. I don't know if you've heard of the 'Sara Bartman' story.
The French Huegenots sort of kidnapped her back to France as a display trophy.
Anyway With the Settlers (1488+)arriving in the Cape region there would eventually be a mixing of peoples which were :-
Portuguese, Spanish, British, Dutch, German, French, other European nationalities, and Local inhabitants such as Khoi-San, Black (slaves as well as the then tribal people). A lot of the 'non-white' people were enslaved at the time.

The 'Coloured' people of the Cape would come mainly from the Khoi-San and to a lesser extent from black/european descendants. The twist of the Apartheid story (1960 - 1995) is that the nation that were 'striving' for racial purity (we've seen this before some 75 years ago) were themselves descendents of the racial intermixing those many hundreds of years ago.
You should have seen the violent denials when this was pointed out to them.

That's my history lesson as far as I can remember
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

danjama
11-22-2005, 01:41 PM
Theres some really great stories here people, really make me smile. Ok lets see, i was born 87, i guess alot of people would say my generation are and will be the last to share these kind of childhoos with you older lot, ya know with kids all stuck to their PSP's or whatever....so, i feel special in this regard. Now i'll share a memory from when my age was single digits http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

I remember when i was around 6 me and a couple of my good friends then would go out behind our flats (apartment, block whatever you call it) and we would play "army men". We would wipe dirt all over our face, get out the toy M16's with the clickety firing noise, and we would really go at it for hours and hours. Man those were some good days. We would use practically the whole town (that we knew of http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif the town is alot larger at that age than u think) to hide in pairs and seek each other out. I would pretend we were in some kind of hostile environment of warfare, ya know like the Gulf was on the news at the time and was a huge influence. I dont think any of us have played a game so seriously since. I remember one of the last times we played it, me and my partner hid up on some garage roofs, and as our enemy patrolled by we jumped up, guns in hand an all, and as we went to shootand shout "dead" the garage roof fell right through http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif So at 8 years old we fell through a roof 8 or 9 feet onto someones car in their garage. Man were we brickin it (scared), we climbed outta there so fast we didnt have time to realise how much our asses hurt! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Ah, good times. If only to be young again...

Im only 18 now but that feels like a world away, im sure all you guys know that feeling better than me though http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Ill share some more another time maybe...

Mackane1
11-22-2005, 05:01 PM
Here's a few more....


The audio track from any film shown on a school projector always had that "gurgly" sound.

The earliest form of gambling we new was "flipping" baseball cards.

VERY important tests always required two #2 pencils.

"Evil Knievel" was our roll model when it came to riding bicycles..........parents loved this. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

The 5th of July was reserved for making "Genies".

The "Good Humor" man wore a uniform and peddled a big tricycle with jingly bells on it.

In the seventies, we all experienced "Fondue"...........once.
(Next time you visit your parents.....look in their basement........you'll find a Fondue Pot still in its original packaging.)



Cheers,
Mackane

wayno7777
11-22-2005, 09:03 PM
The old film strip projector. No sound or the teach had to sync it with a record. (Vinyl disc for you youngin's http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif)....

panther3485
11-23-2005, 04:27 AM
Hi there, vanjast

Thanks for that info - very illuminating.

Best regards,
panther3485