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jjlooxgood
02-06-2008, 12:25 PM
May be this question has been posted in the past. But I am really curious.
I thought there was a freedom to depict any military equipment on commercial entertainment simulation because mililtary equipments are "Public Property". That's right, we the taxpayers own them. But I've heard and read on the internet post that some military equipements, such as our beloved B-17, cannot be put on as flyable because you must pay for copyright or intellectual right issues. Was that the reason why B-17 could not be flyable in Il-2 sim?

Does this intellectual right thing only extend to a few military aircraft or does computer game company has to pay to Boeing or LockMartin everytime they produce a sim?

Thanks guys, and I would greatly appreciate your answers.

jjlooxgood
02-06-2008, 12:25 PM
May be this question has been posted in the past. But I am really curious.
I thought there was a freedom to depict any military equipment on commercial entertainment simulation because mililtary equipments are "Public Property". That's right, we the taxpayers own them. But I've heard and read on the internet post that some military equipements, such as our beloved B-17, cannot be put on as flyable because you must pay for copyright or intellectual right issues. Was that the reason why B-17 could not be flyable in Il-2 sim?

Does this intellectual right thing only extend to a few military aircraft or does computer game company has to pay to Boeing or LockMartin everytime they produce a sim?

Thanks guys, and I would greatly appreciate your answers.

berg417448
02-06-2008, 12:32 PM
Not only do some corporations claim authority over what can be depicted, so do some governments:

http://www.defence.gov.au/raaf/organisation/info_on/units/brand/


Or:

Back in 2004 the Patent Office in the UK rejected the MoD's application to register the roundel as a trademark on clothing .

However, the MoD was given "the sole rights to use the roundel, which appears on all RAF aircraft, on items other than clothing such as military hardware."



If you do a forum search here you'll find numerous threads dealing with this issue. It was a subject that the management preferred not be discussed on this forum.

Crash_Moses
02-06-2008, 12:43 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/26310365/m/3871056582/p/1

http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/26310365/m/809...701075082#6701075082 (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/26310365/m/8091038972?r=6701075082#6701075082)

http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/26310365/m/598...251001392#9251001392 (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/26310365/m/5981054292?r=9251001392#9251001392)

http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/26310365/m/470...701095382#4701095382 (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/26310365/m/4701095382?r=4701095382#4701095382)

MaxMhz
02-06-2008, 05:03 PM
"Intelectual property" is a gigantic BIG swamp.
You've got copyright, trademark,patent and goodness knows a gazillion other things.
What rights there are and how they are divided between the intel. prop. owner and consumer is regulated by the local national authority. Agreement are made internationally through the WTO and it's treaties. US law does not apply to other countries It is perfectly legal in the Netherlands e.g. to burn a copy of a CD and give it to your friend (for that we pay an extra fee on empty media) even if the original is illegal warez. The copy would be legal.

The taxpayer may have payed the bill for the initial product, but that does not mean he owns anything. You payed for your game; PF, IL-2 Sturmnovik 1946, whatever. Yet you do not own it - You only bought the right to use it. (see EULA/copyright etc). The game stays the property of 1C:Maddox/Ubisoft. Just like "your" money is not yours at all. It's your government's. - read the fineprint on it http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Skycat_2
02-06-2008, 05:32 PM
Waiiiiiit a minute, this is another one of those "I want to fly the B-17/B-29" threads ...

Skycat_2
02-06-2008, 06:01 PM
The thing about military aircraft is that they are intimately associated with the contractors who designed them. For example, we know WWII planes as the "Boeing B-17" or "Lockheed P-38." Meanwhile, can you tell me who designed the Sherman M4 medium tank?

I don't know if Lockheed-Martin or Grumman-Northrup, etc., have full legal ownership of every likeness of their designs but they do have the right to protect their company trademarks. If somebody is selling a model kit advertised as the Grumman Avenger, or advertises that plane with those words on a computer game's packaging (hint, hint) this can be argued as an infringement if Northrup-Grumman is opposed to somebody banking on their name without cutting them a slice in return.

As for the B-17 model not being a flyable, the reason comes down to:
1. Nobody modeled the cockpit and bombardier's compartment and ball turret and upper turret and waist gun and other waist gun andtail gun. That's a huge amount of work there.
2. The primary developers aren't particularly interestested in American aircraft, especially high altitude strategic bombers for a low altitude tactical sim. The work would have to have been initiated and satisfactorily completed by 'third party' modelers. Many 'simpler' models died in the womb or were unusable for technical reasons once submitted to the primary developers.

Oleg's perfectionism would have meant that the B-17's flight yokes would have to have the Boeing logo on them. Now we're back to the licensing issue. :P