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DrHerb
01-25-2008, 08:02 PM
Not sure if this was posted before, but the pilot greased her in nicely all things considered http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

http://youtube.com/watch?v=rf9Br4n-hMc&feature=related

DrHerb
01-25-2008, 08:02 PM
Not sure if this was posted before, but the pilot greased her in nicely all things considered http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

http://youtube.com/watch?v=rf9Br4n-hMc&feature=related

I_KG100_Prien
01-25-2008, 09:14 PM
Well done indeed.

LEBillfish
01-25-2008, 11:01 PM
Nice find!...Have never seen that one before. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

M_Gunz
01-25-2008, 11:11 PM
If anyone needs to see why to land gently, there it is!

leitmotiv
01-25-2008, 11:18 PM
I saw an unusual show at Duxford. I visited on a chilly morning in January 1994. Only a few people were around. A good time for viewing---the restoration people gave me access to the Blenheim IV I never would have received on a busy summer day. Right after I arrived I saw a late model Spitfire putting on an incredible show. Climbing and diving over and over, and not easy air show stuff, either. He was thowing the airplane around like he was in a dogfight. Everybody was watching amazed. Then he landed and got out. Very routine. That's when the people in the know told us we almost got to see a Spitfire written off. The Spit's landing gear had refused to deploy. That terrific air show was the desperate pilot using high Gs to throw down the landing gear! It worked.

buzzsaw1939
01-26-2008, 01:03 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Dustysquareback
01-26-2008, 01:28 AM
Was that a Storch in there?

Capt.LoneRanger
01-26-2008, 01:33 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by leitmotiv:
I saw an unusual show at Duxford. I visited on a chilly morning in January 1994. Only a few people were around. A good time for viewing---the restoration people gave me access to the Blenheim IV I never would have received on a busy summer day. Right after I arrived I saw a late model Spitfire putting on an incredible show. Climbing and diving over and over, and not easy air show stuff, either. He was thowing the airplane around like he was in a dogfight. Everybody was watching amazed. Then he landed and got out. Very routine. That's when the people in the know told us we almost got to see a Spitfire written off. The Spit's landing gear had refused to deploy. That terrific air show was the desperate pilot using high Gs to throw down the landing gear! It worked. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Guess somebody in Duxford likes belly-landings? The Hurris gear was not completely lowered and locked either. Guess that's why he tried to bring her down as smooth as possible.

RAF_OldBuzzard
01-26-2008, 02:19 AM
The Hurri driver should have cut the mags once down though. That would have resulted in a bit less prop and enginge damage when he nosed over at the end.

Of course, that's EASY for me to say, since all I have to do is watch the vid and not make the landing. He 'done good', and landing that Hurri without doing major damage was great piloting.

major_setback
01-26-2008, 05:48 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Dustysquareback:
Was that a Storch in there? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Yes. I think there was:

http://www.airshows.org.uk/2005/airshows/woodchurch/photographs/storch_1.jpg

stansdds
01-26-2008, 07:52 AM
If I recall correctly, the pilot of that Hurricane knew there was a problem with the right main gear not locking in the down position. He landed it as gently as possible rather than bailing out and losing the aircraft. His actions preserved the fighter and resulted in minimal damage.

Airmail109
01-26-2008, 07:58 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by stansdds:
If I recall correctly, the pilot of that Hurricane knew there was a problem with the right main gear not locking in the down position. He landed it as gently as possible rather than bailing out and losing the aircraft. His actions preserved the fighter and resulted in minimal damage. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Personally id rather land with no gear or only 1 gear than bail out with a WW2 parachute

Bo_Nidle
01-26-2008, 08:08 AM
The majority of my landings are like that....and its nothing to do with aircraft! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sadeyes.gif

leitmotiv
01-26-2008, 10:01 AM
Ditto.

LEBillfish
01-26-2008, 10:42 AM
Actually, this brings up a VERY good point as to aircraft losses (at least with the Japanese)....The Japanese (as I'm sure all nationalities) lost many, many, many planes to poor take offs and landings, rough or damaged runways, and various equipment failures.

When the 5th Air Force first attacked the Wewak area, they documented significant ground kills of aircraft clustered together. What was odd though is that subsequent attacks found the same thing, and odder still in that the Japanese had a very good early warning system from spotters placed strategically (Wewak area is like dropping off from mountains near the sea, so would post on high points), and even more so the attacks were stated as being "so regular and predictable you could set your watch by them".

After, the Japanese stated losses were much lower then U.S. reports......So naturally it was assumed they were hedging numbers/lying to the general staff.

Fact of the matter was the U.S. often attacked the "junk yards" at every field....Planes kept there most often from problems during landing like above that couldn't be easily repaired, as you don't go out and find the scraps of shoot downs as those planes if you've ever seen many were nothing but twisted metal.

I'd imagine it was the same most places as in truth compared with say commercial pilots today, most of all forces were barely trained in comparision, equipment was more prone to failure, and as said front line fields left a lot to be desired.

leitmotiv
01-26-2008, 10:51 AM
Fascinating.