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View Full Version : to the programmers here would this clock be posible?



raaaid
06-25-2007, 04:27 PM
the idea is to make an ultraprecise watch

my moongraph casio which i bought in 91 has a constant delay of 20 seconds each month

what about making a program that notice that in a month i corrected it 20 seconds and let then seconds happen 20 sec faster each month

then it would appear a delay of 4 seconds may be a year and when i corrected it the clock would take it into account and the longer i had the watch the more precise it will be

do you think this is posible?

sorry to post ot but even you dont believing even posting in the right places means hostility and lately has been some talking on ufos

judge me by my intentions im too lazy to make that clock i just expect synchronicity to happen and if my watch dies be able to buy one of those

raaaid
06-25-2007, 04:27 PM
the idea is to make an ultraprecise watch

my moongraph casio which i bought in 91 has a constant delay of 20 seconds each month

what about making a program that notice that in a month i corrected it 20 seconds and let then seconds happen 20 sec faster each month

then it would appear a delay of 4 seconds may be a year and when i corrected it the clock would take it into account and the longer i had the watch the more precise it will be

do you think this is posible?

sorry to post ot but even you dont believing even posting in the right places means hostility and lately has been some talking on ufos

judge me by my intentions im too lazy to make that clock i just expect synchronicity to happen and if my watch dies be able to buy one of those

DooDaH2007
06-25-2007, 05:02 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by raaaid:
the idea is to make an ultraprecise watch

my moongraph casio which i bought in 91 has a constant delay of 20 seconds each month

what about making a program that notice that in a month i corrected it 20 seconds and let then seconds happen 20 sec faster each month

then it would appear a delay of 4 seconds may be a year and when i corrected it the clock would take it into account and the longer i had the watch the more precise it will be

do you think this is posible?

sorry to post ot but even you dont believing even posting in the right places means hostility and lately has been some talking on ufos

judge me by my intentions im too lazy to make that clock i just expect synchronicity to happen and if my watch dies be able to buy one of those </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Possible to make yes, but useless...

A medium watch will not be off by so many seconds... So there should be no need...

Another thing is that the battery will eventually go out and will need replacing, resetting the watch and the gathered information...

Anyway, what it comes down to is that the money spend in developing or licensing the software to do what you want, would be better spend buying better stuff to make their watches from...

Keep trying though raaaid...
One day, one of those out of the box ideas may make you rich http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

BBB_Hyperion
06-25-2007, 11:38 PM
Well you could buy a atomic clock 2 Hand Edition and synchronize every day so actual impact stays 20/30 with 2/3 a second delay which is between the margin. Other way would be use IAT Radio Service to update it(Of course you need a correction for the signal traveling time).

raaaid
06-26-2007, 05:31 AM
atomic clocks actually are not that precise due to acceleration an decelration of precession

on 25000 years theres a mistake measuring preccesion of 50 years, that means a mistake of two minutes for day for sun position or time as we know it

and you never know when preccesion accelerates or decelerates but that can delay or advance an atomic clock two minutes per day with respect to sun time, the one we use

i think a watch should be for life i feel bad thinking mine could break though it costed me 20 euro, my idea would make a watch the longer you have it the more precise or the better and this goes against all marketing so im afraid my idea has no future, well at least i hope my moongraph casio lasts longer then me, i even took pieces out and keeps working, though its like me,keeps an accurate time but sometimes go crazy with the moongraph(usefull to me to know when theres full moon)

SeaFireLIV
06-26-2007, 05:36 AM
But what if nature itself is inaccurate? Does the sun come up precisely on time? Does dusk appear when it should? Do the planets follow their paths around the sun on time? What if the earth is a nano-second out in its orbit? Your watch is correct but the universe isn`t??

RxMan
06-26-2007, 05:52 AM
You would need a method of telling the timepiece how fast you are traveling, as I am sure you know, time slows down when you speed up.

WhtBoy
06-26-2007, 06:05 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by raaaid:
and you never know when preccesion accelerates or decelerates but that can delay or advance an atomic clock two minutes per day with respect to sun time, the one we use
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I don't know anyone who uses the sun as a measure of time. A second is a defined quantity, although it's duration may be different between observers, and atomic clocks are VERY accurate time keepers.

--Outlaw.

BBB_Hyperion
06-26-2007, 09:56 PM
Actually accuracy is limited place a atomic clock on highest mountain and on 0 level. When there is a precise timing it is based locally and it must take corrections of local magnetic field cycles earth axes movement 32000 years something rotation cycle etc into account . Further the idea of using the sun as measure is pointless as it moves itself . Only reference to a fixed point in the universe can calculate higher precisions from moving objects time. Not to forget that mass deforms time and must be taken into consideration too. Additional to note the effects on quantum level that the clock itself imposes on the universe, so it must calculate it's own effect on the universe in advance to correct time measure for its own presence.

Waldo.Pepper
06-26-2007, 10:25 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">atomic clocks actually are not that precise </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

OMFG this is your best ever Raaaid.

To quote Donald Pleasance you arrogance is truly dazzling.

Raaaid extra 'aa' is for

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/bill%20the%20cat/bill.jpg

Cajun76
06-26-2007, 10:32 PM
Both my Casios are solar powered.

Divine-Wind
06-26-2007, 11:14 PM
I have a solar powered umbrella.

Freelancer-1
06-26-2007, 11:38 PM
Throw away the clock, dude!

You don't need it. There's that big bright light in the sky. It's all you need, really.

Wake up when it first shines in your eyes each day. Then when it goes away for the day find a nice bar and look for women.

You may enjoy it more than sitting around all day blowing doobs, staring at your clock and seeing what weird idea you can start a topic on next http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

raaaid
06-27-2007, 05:44 AM
thats the point if an atomic clock marks a day of 24hours but in a thousand years is 24 hours and 2 minutes in few years will be dark at noon thats why i think theyre not precise

time is measured bu the sun since ancient times, 24 hour, time between two noons, problem this can vary two minutes daily because of precession error