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rcskypilot1953
01-27-2007, 04:50 PM
Ok I now can take off without any problems now but i have one thing to say, now when i get in the air oh about 300 or so ft so i start to stall every time, i have the wheels up and i try to use the right and left rudder to control it what am i doing wrong?????

Thanks http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

rcskypilot1953
01-27-2007, 04:50 PM
Ok I now can take off without any problems now but i have one thing to say, now when i get in the air oh about 300 or so ft so i start to stall every time, i have the wheels up and i try to use the right and left rudder to control it what am i doing wrong?????

Thanks http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

RaVe_N
01-27-2007, 05:13 PM
Air speed... Ill bet your climb is to steep.

advice will depend on your air craft but lets start out with you air speed and climb.

Gradually climb.
ie dont pull back to much on the stick.

Again it up depends on your aircraft but try to keep it around 250 in the climb.

See if that helps for starters. Just don't let it get to slow... To slow is
"STALL SPEED".
There are many sources out there that list the "stall speed" for each aircraft in this sim.
I'm on the way out the door no time to dig A list out for you, perhaps someone could post one up for you http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Keep us posted on your progress.
If you want a little one on one oneline time PM me Ill be happy to help.
RaVe

F16_Neo
01-27-2007, 05:26 PM
Agree with previous poster, don't be in too much hurry to gain altitude, get sufficient airspeed first. You are not retracting flaps too fast are you?
Also, you might want to check joystick calibration or response curves.

Skycat_2
01-27-2007, 07:00 PM
Windows XP shaves 100 KpH off of whatever plane you are flying. To counter this, tilt your monitor away from you so that your plane's nose is pitched down.

knightflyte
01-27-2007, 07:04 PM
You must have automatic updates turned off Skycat. That was fixed long ago.

XyZspineZyX
01-27-2007, 07:08 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by F16_Neo:
Agree with previous poster, don't be in too much hurry to gain altitude, get sufficient airspeed first. You are not retracting flaps too fast are you?
Also, you might want to check joystick calibration or response curves. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Neo, your avatar pic reminds me very much of art done by Russ Nicholson

AlGroover
01-27-2007, 09:36 PM
Try trimming your elevator to 'nose up' by half a dozen clicks before takeoff. Also don't try to match the rate of climb of your AI buddies.

JR_Greenhorn
01-27-2007, 11:39 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by rcskypilot1953:
Ok I now can take off without any problems now but i have one thing to say, now when i get in the air oh about 300 or so ft so i start to stall every time, i have the wheels up and i try to use the right and left rudder to control it what am i doing wrong????? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>That sounds exactly like the problems I had when I first started flying in this sim. For me, it was the worst in the P-39 (in the demo). I could take off all right, but I would just hang at about 100-200m, nose up and just fast enough to stay airborne. If I would try anything, I would stall, slip to one side, and crash. Finally I realized that I was not allowing the plane to pick up enough speed before trying to climb. When flying with AI wingmen, I would try to stay with them at low alt and climb very slowly on the way to the target, or else I would never keep up.
"What the hell, stay on leader's course!"

I also had struggled with taking off at fist too. The fist time I tried to take off was in an Il-2. I crashed 5 times before successfully getting airborne on the sixth try. For a while after that, it was hit and miss.



The greatest sense of acheivement I've ever gotten from this sim was the very first time I successfully landed a FW-190D. In a way, it's funny to think that just getting back to the ground can be so difficult, but I still think landing is the most difficult part of flying for me.

p-11.cAce
01-28-2007, 12:05 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> The greatest sense of acheivement I've ever gotten from this sim was the very first time I successfully landed a FW-190D. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Mine was getting to the point where I can grease in the I-153 regardless of weather conditions 9 times out of 10. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Cajun76
01-28-2007, 12:07 AM
The Power to Weight ratio for WWII aircraft is far below that of modern R/C. Agree with first response, get some forward speed, then gently nose up a bit.

Some planes are very good climbers at low speed, like the Bf-109G6, G10, G14 and K. Late Spitfire(25lbs) and Zero are also good at climbing at lower speeds.

There are others that like a good forward speed before they start climbing well, like the Fw-190D and P-47D and -27. P-47D likes to climb at 400kph+.

If an a/c is going faster than it's neutral cruising trim it will want to nose up on its own. So you may not even need to pull into a climb once your going fast enough. Experiment with your favorite a/c, they all have speed ranges they prefer. Hope this helps, good luck and

JR_Greenhorn
01-28-2007, 12:37 AM
I was going to mention something else, but I forgot in my previous post.
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RaVe_N:
Just don't let it get to slow... To slow is
"STALL SPEED".
There are many sources out there that list the "stall speed" for each aircraft in this sim. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>I switch planes a lot when I play, and I haven't dedicated the time to any one type yet to figure out significant speeds (like stall speed, best climb speed, max dive speed, etc.)

As such, I use rough rule-of-thumb speeds. I wait until 180kph before trying to get off the ground, I usually figure 160 as stall speed, I try to stay at or above 250 when climbing.

Again, these are all rough rule-of-thumb speeds that will serve you well enough when jumping in different planes. Obviously each plane will have its own best speeds for each case.

WWMaxGunz
01-28-2007, 01:35 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Cajun76:
If an a/c is going faster than it's neutral cruising trim it will want to nose up on its own. So you may not even need to pull into a climb once your going fast enough. Experiment with your favorite a/c, they all have speed ranges they prefer. Hope this helps, good luck and </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

On the same point, pilots not engaged in aerobatics will tend to trim their planes for steady
flight at power level, rising or losing alt on need. If you are flying level and trim then
a change in power will bring about change in atitude without any movement of the stick. Add
power to rise, cut power to sink.

Knowing that allows understanding of the "landing mantra". Use pitch to control airspeed,
use power to control altitude. It works as long as you stay ABOVE stall speed, like 30% is
reccomended IRL. It also doesn't help to be coming in hot, it's for regular landings.
If you find your nose up too high and speed still sinking then let the nose come down,
bring power up and go around for another try.

Pitch for speed, power for height. Good luck.

flox
01-28-2007, 01:40 AM
"Stalling and Crashing".. thought for a second this thread was about the eve forums as of late. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Xiolablu3
01-28-2007, 02:00 AM
You need to get more speed up, also use 'take off flaps' until you are in the air and up to 250kph or so - once you feel you have safely taken off in a straight line, switch back to combat flaps, and then about 10 secs later to no flaps.

Tintookkie
01-28-2007, 03:54 AM
Not sure if it's modeled in the game or not but trying to control your aircraft near stall point using your rudder is a recipe for disaster. At low speed you already have minimal air going over your wing (lift), applying rudder produces yaw and this decreases the air flow over the wing that you are yawing into, thus inducing a stall.

p-11.cAce
01-28-2007, 08:11 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> Not sure if it's modeled in the game or not but trying to control your aircraft near stall point using your rudder is a recipe for disaster. At low speed you already have minimal air going over your wing (lift), applying rudder produces yaw and this decreases the air flow over the wing that you are yawing into, thus inducing a stall. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
I hope you never fly IRL http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sadeyes.gif When near the stall its the ailerons and not the rudder that will kill you! While it is true that excessive yaws at low speed are undesirable, it is unlikely that you could get yourself into trouble just by yawing. The real problem with slow flight is handling roll - you get slow and a wing starts to drop off (either becasue of a gust or incipient stall) - you push the stick to the high side to "pick up the wing" and the next thing you know it drops out from under you and you go spinning away! It is critical that you "pick up" a dropping wing in slow flight with the rudder and NOT ailerons.
This is modelled in sim but not to the same extent it has been in some previous patches.