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View Full Version : Anyone see the new knights of the sky pics?



slo_1_2_3
10-27-2006, 09:25 PM
http://www.gennadich.com/ Looks pretty good to me so far i can't wait.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

press eyeballs to screen for free lazer surgery ....cows come, and cows go but the bull stays here. -anonymous-
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slo_1_2_3
10-27-2006, 09:25 PM
http://www.gennadich.com/ Looks pretty good to me so far i can't wait.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

press eyeballs to screen for free lazer surgery ....cows come, and cows go but the bull stays here. -anonymous-
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(^^)

Slickun
11-03-2006, 12:16 PM
I lived with a jet pilot.

The Old Man had to prodded to talk about flying. I think it was because the rest of the non-fighter pilot world didn't deserve to hear about it. My Dad embodied everything that was "fighter pilot", especially the arrogance.

In his later life, and after his number one son became a combat veteran in the Air Force as well, he'd open up a bit. His last couple of years we had some great, fantastic discussions. I was able to catch several on tape. I highly recommend anyone who knows a veteran of ANY war to get an oral history from them before they are gone. Listening to my Dad's voice now, talking about eras long ago, is sad and exilirating at the same time.

His number one "thrill", or memory, was running practice intercepts on SR-71's over Ohio. He was the Commander of the 87th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, and they flew F-101B's. For those unfamiliar with the type, it was a huge A/C for it's day, sporting two J-57's with a great power to weight ratio for that era. It was armed with two Falcon IR missiles and two Geenie nuclear tipped rockets.

The Voodoo was a Mach-2 type A/C with an awesome rate of climb, but it's max altitude was rather mundane, being 50,000 ish.

The idea was to see if the F-101 could intercept the SR-71 when it was going fast and high.

The Blackbird would be at its usual height of 80,000 or more feet, the F-101B coming at it head on around 40,000 feet. Both planes going flat out, closure speed over 3000 mph. Dad said the thing would be easily seen on the F-101's radar way out, being above them and all, they just couldn't lock onto it until they were about 15 miles away. The F-101 would either give the pilot inputs for a Geenie launch, or it could fly it automatically, but you had to lock on. You'd fly the inputs the screen told you to, and it would give you a countdown and a launch cue. You needed all this to get a hit with a rocket, the Geenie was ballistic. Well, I guess you just needed to get close, being a nuclear device and all.

The flight path to hit the SR-71 would be a 6 or 7 G pull up to a monster zoom climb, and a simulated launch at the upper limits of the F-101's controllability.

Dad said they'd be sitting there, twitching, waiting for the radar to lock, and the second it did he'd pull the nose up 45 degrees or so and ride the thing in a big, huge arc. If you did it just right, you had a good chance of a hit.

The F-101 would quit flying somewhere over 50,000 feet and become an airborne pipe, with the same flying qualities. The engines would flame out, and you'd ride the thing, unpowered, down into the thicker air. Restart was done with two special big buttons on the dash that did the sequence for you, you regain control, and recover.

That wasn't what got to him, though. Dad said as the Voodoo rose to its max height, if you looked out the canopy you could see the curvature of the earth. THAT got to him.