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ytareh
08-15-2010, 06:45 AM
Thrilling veteran's autobiography , main interest for us here I guess is his service on Wellingtons in Desert in RAF but a REALLY easy , yet gripping read from start to finish .This gentleman has passed away since this book was first brought to the attention of the IL2 community and his book has now been professionally published by Pen and Sword .
I buy and sell books all the time but my signed copy of the original self published paperback is one of barely half a dozen books I would NEVER part with .Just get it ,you WONT be disappointed ,its not just more of the same , author was a journalist /professional writer and it shows ...

http://www.aloneifly.com/

ytareh
08-15-2010, 06:45 AM
Thrilling veteran's autobiography , main interest for us here I guess is his service on Wellingtons in Desert in RAF but a REALLY easy , yet gripping read from start to finish .This gentleman has passed away since this book was first brought to the attention of the IL2 community and his book has now been professionally published by Pen and Sword .
I buy and sell books all the time but my signed copy of the original self published paperback is one of barely half a dozen books I would NEVER part with .Just get it ,you WONT be disappointed ,its not just more of the same , author was a journalist /professional writer and it shows ...

http://www.aloneifly.com/

ytareh
08-15-2010, 04:13 PM
Just found a press release for Bill's book which gives a good flavour of it:



Former RAF pilot during the Second World War, Bill Bailey has released an account of his extraordinary experience in his new book, Alone I Fly.After undertakng his training at local air force base RAF Halton, Bailey details his fight for survical after his plane crashed on his first bombing mission to Cairo."It seemed strange that here I was, a sergeant pilot in the RAF, and yet without an educational qualification to my name," writes Bailey in early chapters, explaining that he had to endure his onslaught in order to become a member of the RAF.On being asked why he put down specifically to become a pilot despite leaving his village school at 13 without any secondary education, he continued: "Crossing my fingers behind my back I said, 'Because, sir, all my life I have wanted to fly.'"In the book, the author later depicts his final moments at Halton before taking to the skies with his squadron. "The air crackled with tension as the aircrews entered the shabby dusty tent that was being used for briefing. As we filed in, each of us tackled fear in our own way..."I strolled underneath the aircraft and studied with interest the great yawning gap in the black plane's stomach. I stood to one side as the ugly great bomb was wheeled into position."I am sure we were all scared. The moment of take-off, particularly with a 4,000 pounder, was fraught with danger. I clenched my hands until my knuckles were white, as the plane seemed to take over wth a life of its own. The tail was up and there was that strange unstable feel, when suddenly there was a roar and everything disappeared in fog. It was like racing at night with no brakes, and then hitting a bank of fog. All sense of direction left me and with that sort of bomb on board there was no turning back. I sat frozen with horror."Bailey's dream of flying a Wellington aircraft was finally achieved before both the plane and pilot's ambitions were hit by enemy gunfire, leaving only Bailey to navigate his way to safety alone. ulging his terrifng experience of the war away from the safety of the local training base, Bailey uncovers the lengths he went to without much cause or reason having already resigned himself to death."I unplugged myself from the intercom, levered myself out of my seat and turned to leave the pit. Instantly my eyes took in a scene of utter carnage. There was blood everwhere. Impossible to control my stomach, I bent over and vomited, my vomit mixing with the blood on the slippery floor. No longer was war an intellectual exercise; it had suddenly become an obscene reality."I forced myself to concentrate on flying, to try and blot out the memory of the scene behind. Carefully I adjusted the trim until she was flying well and I could afford to take my hands from the controls to strap myself in, After all, one never knew."As the sole survivor of his aircraft crashing in Cairo, Bailey's fight or flight instinct drove him to walk aimlessly in the desert in temperatures of 100 degrees without direction. After finding shelter in an abandoned German reconnaissance truck he found water that enabled him to survive only a few days longer."I lay there for a while only vaguely interested in my discovery, for it was all becoming so pointless. All the agony of my journey and my complete exhaustion were an utter waste of time. If I had stayed on my rocky ledge I would no doubt now be dead, but what had I ganed for all my efforts? Another 24 hours of life? But could this be called life? My tongue was swollen between cracked and ulcerated lips; my face and legs were burning from the scalding sand; all for what reason? It was only postponing the inevitable."Bailey had resigned himself to death when a glimpse of inspiration lead to his final attempt of survival, which later allowed this extraordinary tale to be written.Bailey later went on to become a schoolmaster and a journalist, becoming the editor of a national magazine and an educational correspondent for the BBC before returing and devoting his time to writing non-fictional books including his final labour of love ,Alone I Fly .

Banger2004
08-16-2010, 04:31 AM
Yep, can vouch for this. A good read.

ytareh
08-16-2010, 09:31 AM
Yes as far as I know everyone who's bought it here has loved it ...