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pjohansson
03-19-2005, 08:23 PM
Does anyone know whether Myst V: End of Ages is expected to run OK with an nVIDIA GeForce Go 6200 chipset? The system in question is a VAIO VGN-S380 that I'm thinking of purchasing.

I've read the FAQ on minimum hardware requirements for Uru (in all its flavors)---but how do I know whether an nVIDIA GeForce Go 6200 is "better" than a GeForce 1, 2, 3, 4 or FX? The chipset in question has 32 MB dedicated video memory and can snitch as much as an additional 96 MB of system memory.

Alahmnat
03-19-2005, 10:15 PM
The official word from Ubi regarding laptop cards with Uru is that they are unsupported as a whole, so you take your chances no matter what you have, really. I honestly don't expect that to change with End of Ages since Revelation doesn't officially support any laptop cards either. That's not to say it won't work with a laptop, but if it doesn't, you can't complain to tech support about it.

Cubase1
03-20-2005, 12:20 PM
You will be able to run the game using the 6200 Go but don't expect any eye candy. The 6200 is the budget card of the GeForce6 range from Nvidia. It is about the equivalent of the FX 5600 (or ATI's 9600)... but is tad better, because it incorporates the new ShaderModel 3.0 (a next generation pixel shader model) and TurboCache technology (rapid cahce management for increased memory bandwidth, however it has been said that TurboCahce hampers gaming performance in favour of desktop efficiency.

It is better than the GeForce 1, 2 and 4... but not as good as say a GF3-Ti in DirectX 8 Gaming.

Now, assuming that M-V will use DirectX 9, you are probably in the clear in terms of compatibility with the game, but you are going to come across huge problems with only 32MB of dedicated memory (even if you can add 'shared' memory... as shared memory has a much higher latency when storing game textures... as you will notice larger load times and pausing during game play).

Alahmnat... Notebook cards should be just as compatible as desktop cards as they follow the same architecture. The only thing that differs is the driver set, as they are optimised for notebook usage... but even then most DX 8 and 9 games will run fine on Notebook cards. As a matter of fact, I have yet to find a game that has huge non-resolvable problems using a notebook equivalent of a supported desktop card. So you should be in the clear with any offering from Nvidia or ATI in terms of notebook cards.

For safe gaming with a notebook, I would recommend either a '6600 Go' or higher from Nvidia, or an 'Mobility X600' or higher from ATI. The 6200 Go is NOT designed for gaming, and you will run into massive problems if you try and run the game at any setting that makes it look good.

For reference, here is a small guide as to which cards are the best notebook performers:


Nvidia Notebook Graphics Options:

Budget:
'6200 Go' (available in 32/64mb DDR flavours)

(will run most games, but not terribly well, it's desktop equivalents include: Nvidia 'GeForceFX 5600', A'TI 9600 Pro'. Laptops with this configuration can cost between $900 and $1500 USD.



Midstream:
6600 Go (available in 64/128mb GDDR3 PCI-express flavours)

PCI express is the new version of ATI which enables better data bandwidth between the video card and the CPU)
Will run pretty much anything pretty well, but don't expect to have it all. Performs better then the 'Mobility X600' from ATI, and the same as the Mobility X700' from ATI. Its desktop equivalents include the 'ATI Radeon 9800 Pro' and the 'Nvidia GeForce FX 5800'. Latptops with this configuration can cost between $1500 and $2000 USD.



High-End:
6800 Go (available in 128/256mb GDDR3 flavours PCI-express)

This baby will kick any other laptop out there out of the park, and can even out-do most desktop video card configurations. This thing is a beast and you will be able to play any game (even some that have not yet been released) at close to, if not ALL highest quality settings. It's notebook equivalent is the 'ATI Mobility Radon X800'.However, this card is currently only available on Dell laptops. Laptops with this configuration can cost between $2000 and $2500 USD.


ATI Notebook Graphics Options:

Mobility X300 (available in 32/64mb flavours)
The equivalent of the 6200

Mobility X600 (available in 64/128mb flavours)
A little bit less performance than the 6600 Go

Mobility X700 (available in 64/128 flavours)
Equivalent of the 6600 Go

Mobility X800 (available in 128/256mb flavours)
Equivalent of the 6800 Go


That‚‚ā¨ôs basically the lo-down on notebook graphics options. I would recommend, if you can afford it, to go with either a 6600 Go or a Mobility X600 for safe gaming performance with M-V... both the 6200 Go and the Mobility X300 will struggle with anything higher then 1024 X 768 with anything higher than 'Very Low-Low' in your visual settings.

Hope this helps, if you are curious, just post back!

-Cub. =o)

pjohansson
03-20-2005, 04:03 PM
Thanks! That was just the sort of information I was looking for.

I should probably start a new thread for this one, but what are the initial reports on the Acer Travelmate 8104 vis-√ -vis its suitability for games?

Peter Johansson

Jnathus
03-20-2005, 08:07 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Alahmnat:
. . . Revelation doesn't officially support any laptop cards either. That's not to say it won't work with a laptop, but if it doesn't, you can't complain to tech support about it. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

That seems a little silly to me, although I can 'kind of' see that logic. Laptops are becoming more and more available with more powerful discrete video cards.

I game full-time on my Dell Inspiron 9100, and have no compatibility issues with my games that do not exist on the desktop counterparts for my video card (Radeon 9800 Mobility, which is equivalent to the 9800 Pro desktop chip).

Dell released a final driver release shortly before they cancelled the XPS / 9100 chassis just recently . . . so I have a pretty updated driver, however, that's going to be it from Dell. Updating to newer revisions requires driver hacking (which I can do, but not many others are comfortable with or are capable of doing), however, I'd put money on the fact that as gaming laptops and laptops with more powerful discrete video solutions become more widely sold, the drivers will revert to the use of reference drivers... a trend echoed by the desktop graphics trend of the past.

I believe it is this inability to easily use reference drivers that holds companies back from endorsing the use of laptop video solutions. However, if you're a gamer, you'll usually develop a rudimentary knowledge about driver updating. It is simple survival in the changing winds of compatibility . . or else consign yourself to a close-ended architecture console.

Cubase1
03-20-2005, 08:17 PM
For gaming, the Travelmate 8104 is quite Uber...

The Pentium-M (Centrino) 2.0ghz inside it is the equivalent of around a Pentium-4 3.2Ghz.

The 1GB of Dual Channel DDR Ram is more than enough for most current games (and even some that have yet to be released).

The Radeon X700 will be able to play most games today fairly well, and you may even get a chance to put on a bit of eye-candy options... You will also find that you will be able to play the next couple of generations of games quite safely, only gradually loosing the ability to have certain eye candy available.

Here are some real world performance specs of that particular laptop in gaming:

3DMark05 2,248 points (Nice! That better than my GeForceFX 5950-Ultra! About the equivilant of the ATI 9800XT)
3DMark03 5,709 points (Nicer! once again, equivilant of the 9800Pro/XT)
Farcry v 1.3 - Research 61 FPS (nice)
Farcry v 1.3 - Regulator 28 FPS (not so nice)
Half-life 2 AT_Canal08 85 FPS (Wow!)
Doom3 High Quality 41 FPS (Not bad, and Nvidia Card would ace this one though, seeing as Doom3 uses OpenGL and not DX9... ATI cards don't relly do well in OpenGL based games).

The only thing you will really be missing out in games is ShaderModel 3.0, which currently only Nvidia cards support. Shader Model 3.0 is much like 2.0, however, it provides more efficient pixel shading resulting in better performance... however, many games have yet to implement it so you should not be facing much of a problem there.

The 100GB HDD will prove to be quite handy aswell... not sure how many RPM the HDD is, but if it is either 5200 or 7200 RPM, you are in the clear (I cannot imagine it anything less then 5200 RPM anyway).

the battery life is not bad for a laptop either. Being a Centrino, it uses significantly less power then say, a P4. You also have a nice in-built software suite which enables you to customise its power consumption for an optimal performance/longetivity balance.

All together, the TravelMate 8104 is a great gaming machine, and it will be able to play ANY game you throw at it today at reasonable framerates. Especially Myst V!!! If you c an afford it, I would definitely recommend it, and at only 2.4kg and built in wireless it's a winner!

If there is anything else you want to know, post back!

-Cub. =o)

Coronagold
03-20-2005, 08:37 PM
You know that with every new Myst game came new video requirements. However, this being the last in the Myst series, as homage to us fans, there will probably be minimal new video requirements.

However, concerning SE & SE 2, beware. They might be aiming toward Longhorn or further. Knowing Cyans' trend, I'd say look toward major PC/Mac upgrading in the future.

Jnathus
03-20-2005, 09:16 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Cubase1:
The 100GB HDD will prove to be quite handy aswell... not sure how many RPM the HDD is, but if it is either 5200 or 7200 RPM, you are in the clear (I cannot imagine it anything less then 5200 RPM anyway). <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

It's either 7200, 5400 or 4200. I checked just yesterday and the largest 7200 RPM laptop drive is still 60 GB.

Also, the fastest 100 GB drive is 5400 and it is made by Seagate, however, my Fujitsu 100 GB is running 4200 RPM and is faster than the Seagate hard drive, although this may be aided by the 16 MB cache.

Cubase1
03-23-2005, 05:32 AM
16mb cache on a HDD as slow as 4200rpm is great for sequential access, like loading games. However, for what I use my laptop for, I do a lot of video editing, high definition playback and audio sequencing, so it is constantly needing to reference remote sectors of the drive spontanetously, and at onlt 4200rpm, you can imagine the lag is huge.

Thankfully with gamming, 4200rpm will work out fine, provided that it is not needing to hot-load and reference data during play, which most modern games no longer do anyway. Saying that, if you do go with the 4200 rpm, then you should be right for gaming, but when it comes to something like WMV-HD video or anything that requires high badwidth throughput. However, I would recommend at LEAST 5200rpm, even if you have high cached 4200rpm options... you will cut loading times with both the OS and the Games by a decent percentage, as by the time you crowd you laptop and OS with enough software, the cache is not going to really work as efficiently as it should with so many processes requring chunk of data from remote sectors of the drive constantly.

-Cub. =o)

P.S. Seagate have developed a 100gb 7200 rpm notebook drive... and I think they are available with Dell XPS Gen 2 notebooks (their uber expensive, uber performance flaships). But if you were desperate, you could always go external via USB 2.0 or Firewiree 400/800, anbling capacities of up to 400gb @ 7200rpm. I myself am about to invest in a nice 1000GB (1tb) external drive for footage archival.

Jnathus
03-23-2005, 03:23 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Cubase1:
However, I would recommend at LEAST 5200rpm,

P.S. Seagate have developed a 100gb 7200 rpm notebook drive... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Small note.. I've never seen a notebook drive with 5200 RPM.. it's 5400 RPM

I also believe that Seagate has only developed a 5400 RPM 100 GB notebook drive. I believe only Hitachi was doing the 7200 RPM drives, and I still don't see them making one larger than 60 GB.

Spindle speeds rule the roost in hard drive performance, but since I bought my machine for gaming purposes, I needed the raw capacity over all else. (Games take up some SPACE!)

Cubase1
03-24-2005, 06:42 AM
Introducing the Seagate Momentus 7200.1:

http://www.seagate.com/cda/newsinfo/newsroom/releases/article/0,1121,2169,00.html

..like is said, 7200 RPM, 100GB capacity. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

...trust me, when people and clients rely on the raw facts that I am meant to supply them with, I make sure I never miss a beat.

Also, i meant 5400 rpm, that's a typo http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif ...well, it is between 4200 and 7200 so it kinda flows at 5200 lol!

-Cub. =o)

Jnathus
03-24-2005, 02:24 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Cubase1:
...trust me, when people and clients rely on the raw facts that I am meant to supply them with, I make sure I never miss a beat.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>I didn't know about the 7200 RPM Seagate drive, but it looks like a paper launch, since I can't find a place to buy it! The couple of news stories I dug up on it are all dated in July 2004.. shouldn't this drive be in mass production by now? Dell may have embraced it (according to that article you supplied), but their Inspiron XPS 2 still has a 4200 RPM 100 GB drive . . . So, at this time, the fastest spindle speed I can find on a 100 GB drive is 5400 RPM . . the Seagate Momentus 5400.2 ST9100823A 100GB, which isn't Dell's current choice for largest storage device on their flagship laptop.